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I need to update a table in batches, but it does not work. I tried 2 options below.

Both of the options update the first 10 rows but the update is still running. But only 10 rows remain updated.

Seems like update never finishes and count shows more than number of records in the tables to be updated.

Please advise.

-- OPTION #1

SET NOCOUNT OFF

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Table') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN 
    DROP TABLE #Table   
END

-- select count(*) from  #Table where ID = 0
-- select * from #Table

CREATE TABLE #Table ( ID INT )

WHILE (1 = 1)
    AND ( Select count(*) from #Table ) < 10000
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION

    INSERT INTO #Table (ID) 
    VALUES (1)

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 10000 -- terminating condition;
    BEGIN

    COMMIT TRANSACTION

    BREAK

    END
END

-- UPDATE
WHILE (1 = 1)
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION

    UPDATE TOP (10) upd
        SET ID = 0
    FROM #Table upd

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0 -- terminating condition;
    BEGIN

    COMMIT TRANSACTION

    BREAK

    END
END

-- OPTION #2

SET NOCOUNT OFF

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Table2') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN 
    DROP TABLE #Table2  
END

-- select count(*) from  #Table2 where ID = 0
-- select * from  #Table2

CREATE TABLE #Table2 ( ID INT )

--DECLARE @rows INT
--DECLARE @count INT

WHILE (1 = 1)
    AND ( Select count(*) from #Table2 ) < 10000
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION

    INSERT INTO #Table2 (ID) 
    VALUES (1)

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 10000 -- terminating condition;
    BEGIN

    COMMIT TRANSACTION

    BREAK

    END
END

DECLARE @rows INT
DECLARE @count INT

-- UPDATE
SET @rows = 1
SET @count = 0

WHILE @rows > 0
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION

    UPDATE TOP (10) #Table2 -- upd
        SET ID = 0
    --  FROM #Table upd

    SET @rows = @@ROWCOUNT
    SET @count = @count + @rows

    RAISERROR('COUNT %d', 0, 1, @count) WITH NOWAIT

    COMMIT TRANSACTION
END
1

OK there were a couple of issues with your code.

  1. You can't use TOP in an update - however its fairly straight forward to restrict the rows with a sub-query as shown.
  2. You were setting all the ID's to 1 therefore there was no way to uniquely identify a row, you could only update all of them. I have assumed that in your real life problem you would have unique ID's and I have modified the code to suit.
  3. I'm unsure about the intention of the various nested transactions, they don't appear to accomplish much and they don't match the logic.
    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Table2') IS NOT NULL
    BEGIN 
        DROP TABLE #Table2;
    END

    CREATE TABLE #Table2 (ID INT);

    DECLARE @Count int = 0;

    WHILE (select count(*) from #Table2) < 10000 BEGIN
        INSERT INTO #Table2 (ID) 
        VALUES (@Count)

        -- Make sure we have a unique id for the test, else we can't identify 10 records
        set @Count = @Count + 1;
    END

    -- While exists an 'un-updated' record continue
    WHILE exists (select 1 from #Table2 where ID > 0) BEGIN
        -- Update any top 10 'un-updated' records
        UPDATE #Table2 SET
          ID = 0
        where id in (select top 10 id from #Table2 where ID > 0)
    END

    DROP TABLE #Table2  
15
  • Thanks a lot for your response Dale. Seems like it works. though I'm concerned if this is going to lock the table until everything is updates. Any thoughts ? I tried sp_who2 sp_lock. It shows "S" for Lock mode with Type of "TAB" – enigma6205 Mar 23 '20 at 20:47
  • Also seems like the UPDATE does not stop. – enigma6205 Mar 23 '20 at 20:52
  • The update will only lock the 10 rows for each update, if this impacts other users of the table you could put a delay in the while loop. Like most things SQL related, you will only know when you try it, don't overthink it beforehand. It looks like you are probably doing a one off update anyway? So pick a quiet time... – Dale K Mar 23 '20 at 20:53
  • The update stops, its takes a long time to update 10,000 rows, when you are only updating 10 at a time. Put a select count(*) from #table2 where ID > 0 in the while loop and you will see it slowly count down. – Dale K Mar 23 '20 at 20:54
  • Have you actually determined that its necessary to do such an update? It might be faster and cause less disruption to just do the update in one hit and lock the table for a couple of minutes? – Dale K Mar 23 '20 at 20:54

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