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So I have an issue mainly about performance, since I can actually output the expected result but it takes long time. I am looking for better ways to do the following which lead to faster implementation.

The issue is to fill nulls in a pandas DataFrame row-wise, but considering a start and end index for each column (so the objective is not to fill the entire column, but only between the provided indexes)

Example:

We start by defining our dataframe to be filled and another with the indexes for each row

a = pd.DataFrame(index=range(3), columns=range(10))
values = {0: [3, 7], 1: [2, 4], 2: [1, 5]}
for k, v in values.items():
    a.iloc[k, v] = 1

b = pd.DataFrame({'start': [1, 2, 1], 'end': [7,6,8]})


>>>a
     0    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9
0  NaN  NaN  NaN    1  NaN  NaN  NaN    1  NaN  NaN
1  NaN  NaN    1  NaN    1  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
2  NaN    1  NaN  NaN  NaN    1  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN

>>>b
   start  end
0      1    7
1      2    6
2      1    8

Expected result (end index is non inclusive)

    0    1  2  3  4  5    6    7   8   9
0 NaN  0.0  0  1  0  0  0.0  1.0 NaN NaN
1 NaN  NaN  1  0  1  0  NaN  NaN NaN NaN
2 NaN  1.0  0  0  0  1  0.0  0.0 NaN NaN

At the moment I created a function that take a zip of each dataframe rows and performs a fillna on the row and returns its values back, and then I recreate the dataframe

def _fill_slice(row_ind, value=0):
    row, ind = row_ind
    row[1].iloc[int(ind[0]):int(ind[1])].fillna(value, inplace=True)
    return row[1].values

>>>pd.DataFrame(map(_fill_slice, zip(a.iterrows(), b.values)))
    0    1  2  3  4  5    6    7   8   9
0 NaN  0.0  0  1  0  0  0.0  1.0 NaN NaN
1 NaN  NaN  1  0  1  0  NaN  NaN NaN NaN
2 NaN  1.0  0  0  0  1  0.0  0.0 NaN NaN

This allows me to send rows into a multiple processes through imap later

pd.DataFrame(pool.imap(_fill_slice, zip(a.iterrows(), b.values), chunksize=chunksize))

At the moment my performance is at 15min for ~4M rows, but I feel there should be a better way to do this.

One solution I am going to try is to group similar starts and ends and pass chunks of the dataset at each time. Another possibility is run two loops with the above chunking idea, filling everything up to the end indexes and then putting back the np.nan up to the start indexes. This could possibly reduce the number of overall iterations.

Any other idea out there? Thanks in advance.

1

Here's one to leverage broadcasting + masking -

s = b.start.values
e = b.end.values
R = np.arange(a.shape[1])
a.values[a.isnull().values & (s[:,None]<=R) & (e[:,None]>R)] = value
| improve this answer | |
  • Will try. It seems great. I had thought of numpy implementation but was uneasy with it. Thanks – TPereira Mar 24 at 16:47
  • Ok, this will help a lot for sure. I just made a subsample of the dataset with 1/3 of the rows and this is the result: Old way: 323.95781993865967 Numpy way: 0.311892032623291 – TPereira Mar 24 at 17:03
  • Thanks a lot. Accepted ;) – TPereira Mar 24 at 17:03
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here is another way with pandas , of course not as efficient as numpy though:

s = b.agg(tuple,1).map(lambda x: range(*x)).explode().to_frame()
a = a.fillna(s.assign(val=0).set_index(0,append=True)['val'].unstack(0))

print(a)

     0    1  2  3  4  5    6    7    8    9
0  NaN    0  0  1  0  0    0    1  NaN  NaN
1  NaN  NaN  1  0  1  0  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
2  NaN    1  0  0  0  1    0    0  NaN  NaN
| improve this answer | |

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