1

I have following parsing problem. My keywords can be prefixed with an underscore for deactivation of the option, block etc.

#coding: utf8
from pyparsing import Keyword, Combine, pyparsing_common, Literal, Suppress, Group, OneOrMore

test_string = r'''
keyword1list {
    keyword1 {
        option 213
    }

    _keyword1 {
        option 214
    }
}
'''

This can happen to any keyword, here keyword1list, keyword1 or option. What I like to achieve is to either leave those blocks out during parsing or parse them but catch the deactivation prefix.

Currently, I can successfully parse the "activated" test_string with the following code, but it fails for apparent reasons with the underscored keyword.

lparent = Suppress(Literal('{'))
rparent = Suppress(Literal('}'))

kw1_block = Keyword('keyword1') + lparent
kw1_block = kw1_block + Keyword('option') + pyparsing_common.number.setResultsName('option')
kw1_block = Group(kw1_block + rparent).setResultsName('keyw1')

kw2_block = Keyword('keyword1list') + lparent
kw2_block = kw2_block+ OneOrMore(kw1_block) + rparent
kw2_block = Group(kw2_block).setResultsName('keyword1list', listAllMatches=True)
result = kw2_block.parseString(test_string)
print(result.dump())
tmp = kw2_block.runTests(test_string.replace('\n', '\\n'))
print tmp[0]

My current solution is, to put all keywords in a list and set up a dictionary to combine them all with the underscore and give them a flag.

#coding: utf8
from pyparsing import Keyword, Combine, pyparsing_common, Literal, Suppress, Group, OneOrMore, ZeroOrMore

test_string = r'''
keyword1list {

    _keyword1 {
        option 1
    }
    keyword1 {
        option 2
    }
    _keyword1 {
        option 3
    }
    keyword1 {
        option 4
    }
    keyword1 {
        option 5
    }
}
'''


kwlist = ['keyword1', 'keyword1list', 'option']
keywords = {}
for k in kwlist:
    keywords[k] = Keyword('_' + k).setResultsName('deactivated') | Keyword(
        k).setResultsName('activated')

lparent = Suppress(Literal('{'))
rparent = Suppress(Literal('}'))

kw1_block = keywords['keyword1'] + lparent
kw1_block = kw1_block + keywords[
    'option'] + pyparsing_common.number.setResultsName('option') + rparent
kw1_block = Group(kw1_block).setResultsName('keyword1', listAllMatches=True)

kw2_block = keywords['keyword1list'] + lparent
kw2_block = kw2_block + ZeroOrMore(kw1_block) + rparent
kw2_block = Group(kw2_block).setResultsName('keyword1list')
result = kw2_block.parseString(test_string)
print(result.dump())
tmp = kw2_block.runTests(test_string.replace('\n', '\\n'))
print tmp[0]

While this allows to parse everything properly I have to recreate the logic afterwards (finding the deactivated keywords and drop them from the result), which I like to avoid. I believe I need a parseAction on the underscored keywords to drop those tokens somehow but I currently cannot figure out how to do this.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

1 Answer 1

1

When I see a parser that is intended for filtering out selected blocks of text, my first approach is usually to write a parser that will match just the selected part, and then use transformString with a suppressed form of that parser:

kwlist = ['keyword1', 'keyword1list', 'option']
to_suppress = MatchFirst(Keyword('_' + k) for k in kwlist)
kw_body = nestedExpr("{", "}") | Word(nums)

filter = (to_suppress + kw_body).suppress()
print(filter.transformString(test_string))

Running this with your test string gives:

keyword1list {


    keyword1 {
        option 2
    }

    keyword1 {
        option 4
    }
    keyword1 {
        option 5
    }
}
1
  • I was hoping you would see this problem, since I know you are the author of pyparsing and has answered a lot of questions. Thank you very much, yes filtering makes my life much easier.
    – Bort
    Mar 25, 2020 at 7:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.