2

I get the "FATAL: sorry, too many clients already" every now and then because I have a lot of idle connecions in Postgres, and I cannot understand where they are coming from or how to prevent them.

At first I tried the CONN_MAX_AGE setting in Django but it does not seem to have an effect.

I also set idle_in_transaction_session_timeout to 5min in Postgres, but I keep seeing a lot of idle transactions:

postgres=# select client_addr, state, count(*) from pg_stat_activity group by client_addr, state;
  client_addr  | state  | count 
---------------+--------+-------
               |        |     5
               | active |     1
               | idle   |     1
 172.30.12.148 | idle   |     2
 172.30.12.74  | idle   |    89
(5 rows)
postgres=# select client_addr, state, backend_start, query_start from pg_stat_activity order by query_start ;
  client_addr  | state  |         backend_start         |          query_start          
---------------+--------+-------------------------------+-------------------------------
               | idle   | 2020-03-24 20:03:16.060707+00 | 2020-03-24 20:55:17.020962+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 02:05:32.567976+00 | 2020-03-25 02:05:32.613112+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 02:05:34.926656+00 | 2020-03-25 02:05:34.945405+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 02:05:49.700201+00 | 2020-03-25 02:05:49.717165+00
[...]
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 04:00:51.019892+00 | 2020-03-25 04:01:22.627659+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 04:04:18.333413+00 | 2020-03-25 04:04:18.350539+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 04:04:35.157547+00 | 2020-03-25 04:05:16.746978+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 04:05:08.241291+00 | 2020-03-25 04:05:39.367247+00
 172.30.12.148 | idle   | 2020-03-25 04:07:02.717151+00 | 2020-03-25 04:07:02.726822+00
 172.30.12.74  | idle   | 2020-03-25 04:07:48.07922+00  | 2020-03-25 04:07:48.112819+00
               | active | 2020-03-25 04:00:10.608213+00 | 2020-03-25 04:07:57.336091+00
               |        | 2020-03-24 19:40:38.624442+00 | 
               |        | 2020-03-24 19:40:38.624876+00 | 
               |        | 2020-03-24 19:40:38.624003+00 | 
               |        | 2020-03-24 19:40:38.623479+00 | 
               |        | 2020-03-24 19:40:38.62598+00  | 
(99 rows)

I understand that Django maintains one connection per thread, but (if I can believe that snippet) I only have one:

root@omaha-server-public-565447b47c-c2nqh:/usr/src/app# python manage.py shell        
Python 3.7.1 (default, Nov 16 2018, 22:26:09) 
[GCC 6.3.0 20170516] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
(InteractiveConsole)
>>> import threading
>>> for thread in threading.enumerate(): print(thread.name)
... 
MainThread
>>> 

So why, when I list connections to my DB (running at 10.100.59.225) I see so many ESTABLISHED connections ?

root@omaha-server-public-565447b47c-c2nqh:/usr/src/app# netstat -natup | grep  10.100.59.225 | wc -l
89

I am new to Django, Python and Postgres, so I guess I have overlooked something obvious, but my searches have not brought anything useful yet so I'm trying here :-)

Version information:

  • Django 2.2
    • django-cacheops 4.1
    • psycopg2 2.7.3.2
  • Postgres 12.2
  • Python 3.7.1
  • 2
    The shell management command is not able to give any information about the threading in the Django server since it is its own process with its own thread(s). – Klaus D. Mar 25 at 5:00
  • 1
    Looking at pg_stat_activity.query (the last query they ran before going idle) might help you to know where they are coming from. – jjanes Mar 25 at 14:23
  • Thanks @KlausD., I will retry with gdb and edit my post with that info. – glatapoui Mar 25 at 17:18
  • Based on @jjanes's suggestion, I analyzed the queries and it is +/- always the same one. I guess I narrowed it down to a cached QuerySet, but I still don't see why the connection is maintained. If I understand properly Django's auto close mechanism this should not happen. From what I gathered there is no direct c onnection created to the DB in the app itself, it all relies on other libs to do so (cacheops, rest_framework,...) – glatapoui Mar 25 at 20:27
  • I just ran into the same problem on a fast CentOS box, a Ruby gem direct into PostgreSQL 10. Multiple clients run into the same capacity. I tested it with 12 connections (4 cores), which was recommended by a PostgreSQL text on the subject of optimization (3x core count). My queries are dirt simple and are actually returned, then stay idle, then repeat the process. I have 5 queries asking for last login. The table is the size of a test table. This sounds like a PostgreSQL issue. – Rich_F Jun 23 at 23:40
1

Actually you have more idle sessions than idle transaction in idle sessions: this looks like a possible connection leak on application side. PostgreSQL does not have timeout for idle sessions that don't run any transaction. A possible workaround on PostgreSQL side is to schedule a job to kill these idle sessions: see Is there a timeout for idle PostgreSQL connections?

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks ! I misunderstood the difference between tx and session. I would have liked to solve the leak issue rather than introduce another dependency. It seems I will have to do that, I tried the trigger but couldn't make it work: ``` postgres=# CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION terminate_idle_sessions() RETURNS trigger LANGUAGE plpgsql AS $function$ BEGIN SELECT pg_terminate_backend(pid) FROM pg_stat_activity WHERE pid <> pg_backend_pid() AND state = 'idle' AND state_change is not null AND current_timestamp - state_change > INTERVAL '5' MINUTE; END; $function$ ; ``` – glatapoui Mar 25 at 21:57

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