27

In this answer, zwol made this claim:

The correct way to convert two bytes of data from an external source into a 16-bit signed integer is with helper functions like this:

#include <stdint.h>

int16_t be16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[static 2]) {
    uint32_t val = (((uint32_t)data[0]) << 8) | 
                   (((uint32_t)data[1]) << 0);
    return ((int32_t) val) - 0x10000u;
}

int16_t le16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[static 2]) {
    uint32_t val = (((uint32_t)data[0]) << 0) | 
                   (((uint32_t)data[1]) << 8);
    return ((int32_t) val) - 0x10000u;
}

Which of the above functions is appropriate depends on whether the array contains a little endian or a big endian representation. Endianness is not the issue at question here, I am wondering why zwol subtracts 0x10000u from the uint32_t value converted to int32_t.

Why is this the correct way?

How does it avoid the implementation defined behavior when converting to the return type?

Since you can assume 2's complement representation, how would this simpler cast fail: return (uint16_t)val;

What is wrong with this naive solution:

int16_t le16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[static 2]) {
    return (uint16_t)data[0] | ((uint16_t)data[1] << 8);
}
  • The exact behavior when casting to int16_t is implementation-defined, so the naive approach isn't portable. – nwellnhof Mar 26 at 9:56
  • @nwellnhof there is no cast to int16_t – M.M Mar 26 at 9:57
  • The question in the title can't be answered without specifying which mapping to use – M.M Mar 26 at 10:17
  • 4
    Both approaches rely on implementation defined behavior (converting an unsigned value to a signed type that can't represent the value). Eg. in the first approach, 0xFFFF0001u can't be represented as int16_t, and in the second approach 0xFFFFu can't be represented as int16_t. – Sander De Dycker Mar 26 at 10:25
  • 1
    "Since you can assume 2's complement representation" [citation needed]. C89 and C99 certainly did not deny 1s complement and sign-magnitude representations. Q.v., stackoverflow.com/questions/12276957/… – Eric Towers Mar 26 at 21:55
18

If int is 16-bit then your version relies on implementation-defined behaviour if the value of the expression in the return statement is out of range for int16_t.

However the first version also has a similar problem; for example if int32_t is a typedef for int, and the input bytes are both 0xFF, then the result of the subtraction in the return statement is UINT_MAX which causes implementation-defined behaviour when converted to int16_t.

IMHO the answer you link to has several major issues .

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    But what is the correct way? – idmean Mar 27 at 8:02
  • @idmean the question needs clarification before that can be answered, I have requested in a comment under the question but OP hasn't responded – M.M Mar 27 at 8:04
  • 1
    @M.M: I edited the question the specify that endianness is not the issue. IMHO the issue zwol is trying to solve is the implementation defined behavior when converting to the destination type, but I agree with you: I believe he is mistaken as his method has other problems. How would you solve the implementation defined behavior efficiently? – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 28 at 12:32
  • @chqrlieforyellowblockquotes I wasn't referring to endianness specifically. Do you just want to put the exact bits of the two input octets into the int16_t ? – M.M Mar 28 at 13:19
  • @M.M: yes, that's exactly the question. I wrote bytes but the correct word should indeed be octets as the type is uchar8_t. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 28 at 13:35
6

This should be pedantically correct and work also on platforms that use sign bit or 1's complement representations, instead of the usual 2's complement. The input bytes are assumed to be in 2's complement.

int le16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[static 2]) {
    unsigned value = data[0] | ((unsigned)data[1] << 8);
    if (value & 0x8000)
        return -(int)(~value) - 1;
    else
        return value;
}

Because of the branch, it will be more expensive than other options.

What this accomplishes is that it avoids any assumption on how int representation relates to unsigned representation on the platform. The cast to int is required to preserve arithmetic value for any number that will fit in target type. Because the inversion ensures top bit of 16-bit number will be zero, the value will fit. Then the unary - and subtraction of 1 apply the usual rule for 2's complement negation. Depending on platform, INT16_MIN could still overflow if it doesn't fit in the int type on the target, in which case long should be used.

The difference to the original version in the question comes at the return time. While the original just always subtracted 0x10000 and 2's complement let signed overflow wrap it to int16_t range, this version has the explicit if that avoids signed wrapover (which is undefined).

Now in practice, almost all platforms in use today use 2's complement representation. In fact, if the platform has standard-compliant stdint.h that defines int32_t, it must use 2's complement for it. Where this approach sometimes comes handy is with some scripting languages that don't have integer data types at all - you can modify the operations shown above for floats and it will give the correct result.

|improve this answer|||||
  • The C Standard specifically mandates that int16_t and any intxx_t and their unsigned variants must use 2's complement representation without padding bits. It would take a purposely perverse architecture to host these types and use another representation for int, but I guess the DS9K could be configured this way. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 27 at 7:24
  • @chqrlieforyellowblockquotes Good point, I changed to use int to avoid the confusion. Indeed if the platform defines int32_t it must be 2's complement. – jpa Mar 27 at 7:30
  • These types were standardized in C99 this way: C99 7.18.1.1 Exact-width integer types The typedef name intN_t designates a signed integer type with width N, no padding bits, and a two’s complement representation. Thus, int8_t denotes a signed integer type with a width of exactly 8 bits. Other representations are still supported by the standard, but for other integer types. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 27 at 7:30
  • With your updated version, (int)value has implementation defined behavior if type int has just 16 bits. I'm afraid you need to use (long)value - 0x10000, but on non 2's complement architectures, the value 0x8000 - 0x10000 cannot be represented as a 16-bit int, so the problem stays. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 27 at 7:32
  • @chqrlieforyellowblockquotes Yeah, just noticed the same, I fixed with ~ instead, but long would work equally well. – jpa Mar 27 at 7:34
5

Another method - using union:

union B2I16
{
   int16_t i;
   byte    b[2];
};

In program:

...
B2I16 conv;

conv.b[0] = first_byte;
conv.b[1] = second_byte;
int16_t result = conv.i;

first_byte and second_byte can be swapped according to little or big endian model. This method is not better but is one of alternatives.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Isn't union type punning unspecified behaviour? – Maxim Egorushkin Mar 26 at 10:31
  • 1
    @MaximEgorushkin: Wikipedia is not an authoritative source for interpreting the C standard. – Eric Postpischil Mar 26 at 11:46
  • 2
    @EricPostpischil Focusing on the messenger rather than the message is unwise. – Maxim Egorushkin Mar 26 at 13:57
  • 1
    @MaximEgorushkin: oh yes, oops I misread your comment. Assuming byte[2] and int16_t are the same size, it is one or the other of the two possible orderings, not some arbitrary shuffled bitwise place values. So you can at least detect at compile time what endianness the implementation has. – Peter Cordes Mar 26 at 20:29
  • 1
    The standard clearly states that the value of the union member is the result of interpreting the stored bits in the member as a value representation of that type . There are implementation-defined aspects insofaras the representation of types is implementation-defined. – M.M Mar 26 at 22:42
5

The arithmetic operators shift and bitwise-or in expression (uint16_t)data[0] | ((uint16_t)data[1] << 8) don't work on types smaller than int, so that those uint16_t values get promoted to int (or unsigned if sizeof(uint16_t) == sizeof(int)). Still though, that should yield the correct answer, since only the lower 2 bytes contain the value.

Another pedantically correct version for big-endian to little-endian conversion (assuming little-endian CPU) is:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int16_t be16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[2]) {
    int16_t r;
    memcpy(&r, data, sizeof r);
    return __builtin_bswap16(r);
}

memcpy is used to copy the representation of int16_t and that is the standard-compliant way to do so. This version also compiles into 1 instruction movbe, see assembly.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    @M.M One reason __builtin_bswap16 exists is because byte-swapping in ISO C cannot be implemented as efficiently. – Maxim Egorushkin Mar 26 at 10:21
  • 1
    Not true; the compiler could detect that the code implements byte swapping and translate it as an efficient builtin – M.M Mar 26 at 10:24
  • 1
    Converting int16_t to uint16_t is well defined: negative values convert to values greater than INT_MAX, but converting these values back to uint16_t is implementation defined behavior: 6.3.1.3 Signed and unsigned integers 1. When a value with integer type is converted to another integer type other than_Bool, if the value can be represented by the new type, it is unchanged. ... 3. Otherwise, the new type is signed and the value cannot be represented in it; either the result is implementation-defined or an implementation-defined signal is raised. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 26 at 10:49
  • 1
    @MaximEgorushkin gcc doesn't seem to do so good in the 16-bit version, but clang generates the same code for ntohs/__builtin_bswap and the |/<< pattern: gcc.godbolt.org/z/rJ-j87 – PSkocik Mar 26 at 11:32
  • 3
    @M.M: I think Maxim is saying "can't in practice with current compilers". Of course a compiler could not suck for once and recognize loading contiguous bytes into an integer. GCC7 or 8 did finally re-introduce load/store coalescing for cases where byte-reverse isn't needed, after GCC3 dropped it decades ago. But in general compilers tend to need help in practice with a lot of stuff that CPUs can do efficiently but which ISO C neglected / refused to portably expose. Portable ISO C is not a good language for efficient code bit / byte-manipulation. – Peter Cordes Mar 26 at 20:35
3

Here is another version that relies only on portable and well-defined behaviours (header #include <endian.h> is not standard, the code is):

#include <endian.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>

static inline void swap(uint8_t* a, uint8_t* b) {
    uint8_t t = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = t;
}
static inline void reverse(uint8_t* data, int data_len) {
    for(int i = 0, j = data_len / 2; i < j; ++i)
        swap(data + i, data + data_len - 1 - i);
}

int16_t be16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[2]) {
    int16_t r;
#if __BYTE_ORDER == __LITTLE_ENDIAN
    uint8_t data2[sizeof r];
    memcpy(data2, data, sizeof data2);
    reverse(data2, sizeof data2);
    memcpy(&r, data2, sizeof r);
#else
    memcpy(&r, data, sizeof r);
#endif
    return r;
}

The little-endian version compiles to single movbe instruction with clang, gcc version is less optimal, see assembly.

|improve this answer|||||
  • @chqrlieforyellowblockquotes Your main concern seems to have been uint16_t to int16_t conversion, this version doesn't have that conversion, so here you go. – Maxim Egorushkin Mar 30 at 15:15
1

I want to thank all contributors for theirs answers. Here is what the collective works boils down to:

  1. As per the C Standard 7.20.1.1 Exact-width integer types: types uint8_t, int16_t and uint16_t must use two's complement representation without any padding bits, so the actual bits of the representation are unambiguously those of the 2 bytes in the array, in the order specified by the function names.
  2. computing the unsigned 16 bit value with (unsigned)data[0] | ((unsigned)data[1] << 8) (for the little endian version) compiles to a single instruction and yields an unsigned 16-bit value.
  3. As per the C Standard 6.3.1.3 Signed and unsigned integers: converting a value of type uint16_t to signed type int16_t has implementation defined behavior if the value is not in the range of the destination type. No special provision is made for types whose representation is precisely defined.
  4. to avoid this implementation defined behavior, one can test if the unsigned value is larger than INT_MAX and compute the corresponding signed value by subtracting 0x10000. Doing this for all values as suggested by zwol may produce values outside the range of int16_t with the same implementation defined behavior.
  5. testing for the 0x8000 bit explicitly causes the compilers to produce inefficient code.
  6. a more efficient conversion without implementation defined behavior uses type punning via a union, but the debate regarding the definedness of this approach is still open, even at the C Standard's Committee level.
  7. type punning can be performed portably and with defined behavior using memcpy.

Combining points 2 and 7, here is a portable and fully defined solution that compiles efficiently to a single instruction with both gcc and clang:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>

int16_t be16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[2]) {
    int16_t r;
    uint16_t u = (unsigned)data[1] | ((unsigned)data[0] << 8);
    memcpy(&r, &u, sizeof r);
    return r;
}

int16_t le16_to_cpu_signed(const uint8_t data[2]) {
    int16_t r;
    uint16_t u = (unsigned)data[0] | ((unsigned)data[1] << 8);
    memcpy(&r, &u, sizeof r);
    return r;
}

64-bit Assembly:

be16_to_cpu_signed(unsigned char const*):
        movbe   ax, WORD PTR [rdi]
        ret
le16_to_cpu_signed(unsigned char const*):
        movzx   eax, WORD PTR [rdi]
        ret
|improve this answer|||||
  • I am not a language lawyer, but only char types can alias or contain the object representation of any other type. uint16_t isn't one of char types, so that memcpy of uint16_t to int16_t is not well-defined behaviour. The standard only requires char[sizeof(T)] -> T > char[sizeof(T)] conversion with memcpy to be well defined. – Maxim Egorushkin Apr 1 at 3:24
  • memcpy of uint16_t to int16_t is implementation-defined at best, not portable, not well-defined, exactly as assignment of one to the other, and you cannot magically circumvent that with memcpy. It doesn't matter whether uint16_t uses two's complement representation or not, or padding bits are present or not - that isn't behaviour defined or required by C standard. – Maxim Egorushkin Apr 1 at 3:43
  • With so many words, your "solution" boils down to replacing r = u to memcpy(&r, &u, sizeof u) but the latter is no better than the former, is it? – Maxim Egorushkin Apr 1 at 3:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.