1

I have an image from which I get the contour of using findContours. This products something that looks like the following: (showing the "inner and outer contour").enter image description here

Is there a way for me to get the "midpoint" of these two contours? ie some kind of polyline that would fit exactly in between the two lines seen in the image, such that the distance at any point on the resultant time is the same from it to the top contour as is from it to the bottom contour?

More complicated example would be something as follows: enter image description here

Please note, that it doesnt matter too much what happens at intersections, so long as nothing traces back on itself, so the result of the more complicated example would need multiple lines.

  • you can try using the skeleton / thinning algorithm ( see here or here) of the original blob (before findContours) – Miki Mar 26 at 17:53
  • If there is some other images like this you are planning to use, can you share the other sample images too? For this one, some simple algorithms can be applied to find middle contour but we need to see other samples if there are. – Yunus Temurlenk Mar 26 at 18:17
  • I have added another example – Iza Mar 27 at 17:18
0

There is a way to get the "midpoint" of the two contours, but I don't think there is an existing OpenCV solution.

You may use the following stages:

  • Convert image to Grayscale, and apply binary threshold.
    You may use cvtColor(... COLOR_BGR2GRAY) and threshold(...) OpenCV functions.
  • Fill the pixels outsize the area between lines with white color.
    You may use floodFill OpenCV function.
  • Apply "distance transform" to the binary image.
    You may use distanceTransform OpenCV function.
    Use CV_DIST_L2 for euclidean distance.
  • Apply Dijkstra's algorithm for finding the shortest paths between most left and most right nodes.
    Representing "distance transform" result (image) as weighted graph and applying Dijkstra's algorithm is the most challenging stage.

I implemented the solution in MATLAB.
The MATLAB implemented is used as a "proof of concept".
I know you were expecting C++ implementation, but it requires a lot of work.

The MATLAB implementation uses im2graph function, I downloaded from here.

Here is the MATLAB implementation:

origI = imread('two_contours.png'); % Read input image
I = rgb2gray(origI);  % Convert RGB to Grayscale.
BW = imbinarize(I); % Convert from Grayscale to binary image.

% Fill pixels outsize the area between lines.
BW2 = imfill(BW, ([1, size(I,2)/2; size(I,1), size(I,2)/2]));

% Apply "distance transform" (find compute euclidean distance from closest white pixel)
D = bwdist(BW2);

% Mark all pixels outsize the area between lines with zero.
D(BW2 == 1) = 0;

figure;imshow(D, []);impixelinfo % Display D matrix as image

[M, N] = size(D);

% Find starting point and end point - assume we need to find a path from left side to right side.
x0 = 1;
[~, y0] = max(D(:, x0));

x1 = N;
[~, y1] = max(D(:, x1));

% https://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/46088-dijkstra-lowest-cost-for-images
StartNode = y0;
EndNode = M*N - (M-y1-1);
conn = 8;%4 or 8 - connected neighborhood for linking pixels

% Use 100 - D, because graphshortestpath searches for minimum weight (and we are looking for maximum weight path).
CostMat = 100 - D;
G = im2graph(CostMat, conn);

%Find "shortest" path from StartNode to EndNode
[dist, path, pred] = graphshortestpath(G, StartNode, EndNode);

% Mark white path in image J image
J = origI;R = J(:,:,1);G = J(:,:,2);B = J(:,:,3);
R(path) = 255;G(path) = 255;B(path) = 255;
J = cat(3, R, G, B);
figure;imshow(J);impixelinfo % Display J image

Result:

D - Result of distance transform:
enter image description here

J - Original image with "path" marked with white color:
enter image description here


Update:

For the new example you can define three paths.

The solution becomes more complicated.
The example is not generalized to solve all the cases.

There must be a simpler solution, I just can't think of one.

tmpI = imread('three_contours.png'); % Read input image
origI = permute(tmpI, [2, 1, 3]); % Transpose image
I = rgb2gray(origI);  % Convert RGB to Grayscale.
BW = imbinarize(I); % Convert from Grayscale to binary image.

% Fill pixels outsize the area between lines.
%BW2 = imfill(BW, ([1, size(I,2)/2; size(I,1), size(I,2)/2]));
BW2 = imfill(BW, ([1, 1; size(I,1), size(I,2); size(I,2)/2, 1]));

% Apply "distance transform" (find compute euclidean distance from closest white pixel)
D = bwdist(BW2);

% Mark all pixels outsize the area between lines with zero.
D(BW2 == 1) = 0;

figure;imshow(D, []);impixelinfo % Display D matrix as image

[M, N] = size(D);

% Find starting point and end point - assume we need to find a path from left side to right side.
x0 = 1;
[~, y0a] = max(D(1:M/2, x0));

% Y coordinate of second point
[~, y0b] = max(D(M/2:M, x0));
y0b = y0b + M/2;

x1 = N;
[~, y1] = max(D(:, x1));

% https://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/46088-dijkstra-lowest-cost-for-images
StartNodeA = y0a;
StartNodeB = y0b;
EndNode = M*N - (M-y1-1);
conn = 8;%4 or 8 - connected neighborhood for linking pixels

% Use 100 - D, because graphshortestpath searches for minimum weight (and we are looking for maximum weight path).
D(D==0) = -10000; % Increase the "cost" where D is zero
CostMat = 1000 - D;
G = im2graph(CostMat, conn);

%Find "shortest" path from StartNode to EndNode
[dist, pathA, pred] = graphshortestpath(G, StartNodeA, EndNode);

[dist, pathB, pred] = graphshortestpath(G, StartNodeB, EndNode);

[dist, pathC, pred] = graphshortestpath(G, StartNodeA, StartNodeB);

% Mark white path in image J image
J = origI;R = J(:,:,1);G = J(:,:,2);B = J(:,:,3);
R(pathA) = 255;
G(pathB) = 255;
B(pathC) = 255;
J = cat(3, R, G, B);
J = permute(J, [2, 1, 3]); % Transpose image
figure;imshow(J);impixelinfo % Display J image

Three lines:
enter image description here

|improve this answer|||||
  • What would happen at branches? I have added another sample image – Iza Mar 27 at 17:20
  • It is solvable, but I don't know how to generalize the solution. Can you tell what class of problem is this? – Rotem Mar 27 at 18:44
  • You can also get the skeleton after applying distance transform. It is much simpler than using Dijkstra, but the result is not so nice. – Rotem Mar 27 at 19:08
  • Your solution for 3 lines looks good. I suppose the issue here is that there can be an aribtrary number of lines. The result itself I think is good. – Iza Mar 27 at 19:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.