3

Is there any place or any one out there who can explain how this works in plain English instead of "defining terms in terms of themselves"?

9

So, you have a class that is dependent on something else.

Lets use a metaphor: a car requires an engine.

The car is dependent on the engine. It's easy to test that the car and engine work together, but what about testing the car without an engine, or that the car "calls" the engine correctly. What we could do is put something (a mock) in place of the engine, and press the gas (make a call), and verify that the fake (mock) engine received the correct input to the throttle body. Rather than verifying the whole system, you've just tested the thing you want in isolation by measuring with a mock object.

It gets way more complicated and way more powerful in practice, but...

3

If you write units test for your classes, at some point you'll encounter a situation where your test executes code calling an external resource. Most often this is a database, but others are possible as well. I usually use a creditcard billing service provider as an example because in that situation it becomes obvious you don't want to actually call the service each time you run a test.

In such a situation it is common to replace the service object with a sort of fake service that does not use any resources. This is called a stub or a mock object. The difference between a stub and a mock seems to be the subject of some discussion but in essence they are the same.

Mocking frameworks as Rhino Mock help you create mock objects that respond as you would expect the actual service. You could compare the to recordings made of the actual responses of the service calls that you can replay each time you perform the test.

2

To really understand Mocks you first have to grasp four concepts

What is interaction testing

What are isolation frameworks (like rhino mocks)

What is a fake

What is a stub

And finally what is a mock

Interaction testing is about checking if a particular method (the one you are testing) calls another method in another class (the external dependency) with the parameters it is supposed to use. Imagine you have a method in some class that logs every time it is called with invalid parameters. For clarifying the difference between stubs and mocks I've added 2 external dependencies (IStringAnalyzer and ILooger):

class SomeClass
{
    IStringAnalyzer stringAnalizer;
    ILogger logger;

    public SomeClass(IStringAnalyzer stringAnalyzer, ILogger logger)
    {   
        this.logger = logger;
        this.stringAnalyzer = stringAnalyzer;
    }


    public void SomeMethod(string someParameter)
    {
        if (stringAnalyzer.IsValid(someParameter))
        {
            logger.Log("Invalid string");
        }else
        {
            //do something with someParameter
        }
    }
}

In this example you want to test if a method call to SomeClass' SomeMethod with an invalid parameter calls the log method in ILogger with the string parameter "Invalid string". You do not want to use your "real" implementations of IStringAnalyzer and ILogger because these can have errors, and because this is unit testing you just want to test one thing at a time, if you test how test several things at a time what you are really doing is integration testing. The reason for only testing one thing at a time is that if your test fails you know immediately that it is failing because of that only thing you are testing.

You need to provide two alternative implementations, one for IStringAnalyzer and one for ILogger so that you can do this test properly. There will be a difference in these alternative implementations in terms of what they need to do. For IStringAnalyzer you just want that, when it's called it returns false, so that the method under test will go through the code path you want to test. You really don't care about the parameter's value (someParameter).

For ILogger's log method you want to know that it was called, and that it was called with "Invalid string", so that you can assert this in your test.

These two alternative implementations of IStringAnalyzer and ILogger are both called "fakes" (because they fake the external dependencies), but one is a Stub (IStringAnalyzer) and the other is a mock (ILogger). The stub is there only to get you to where you need to go in your test (in this case that IStringAnalyzer's IsValid method returns false). The mock is there to allow you to check if the interaction with the external dependency was done properly (in this case ILogger). Some people refer to mocks (or to this type of mock) as a Test Spy (an infinitely better name in my opinion). And yes, there are other types of mocks (I've never used them though). A good source for this is Working with legacy code form Michael Feathers and Roy Osherove's The art of unit testing.

You can create the stub and mock "by hand", for example:

class StringAnalyzerStub : IStringAnalyzer 
{   
    public bool whatToReturn;

    public StubStringAnalyzerStub(bool whatToReturn)
    {
        this.whatToReturn = whatToReturn;
    }

    public bool IsValid(string parameter)
    {
        return whatToReturn;
    }
}


class LoggerMock : ILogger
{
    public string WhatWasPassedIn;

    public void Log(string message)
    {
        WhatWasPassedIn = message;
    }
}

And here's the test:

[Test]
public void SomeMethod_InvalidParameter_CallsLogger
{
    IStringAnalyzer s = new StringAnalyzerStub(false); //will always return false when IsValid is called
    ILogger l = new LoggerMock();
    SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass(s, l);

    someClass.SomeMethod("What you put here doesnt really matter because the stub will always return false");

    Assert.AreEqual(l.WhatWasPassedIn, "Invalid string");
}

The thing about doing this by hand is that it is error prone and hard to maintain, hence the need for isolation frameworks like Rhino Mocks. They allow you to create these mocks and stubs dynamically, here's how the same test would look like using Rhino Mocks (using the arrange, act, assert syntax):

[Test]
public void SomeMethod_InvalidParameter_CallsLogger
{
    Rhino.Mocks.MockRepository mockRepository = new Rhino.Mocks.MockRepository();
    IStringAnalyzer s = mockRepository.Stub<IStringRepository>();
    s.Expect(s => s.IsValid("something, doesnt matter").IgnoreParameters().Return(false);
    ILogger l = mockRepository.DynamicMock<ILogger>();
    l.Log("Invalid string");
    SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass(s, l);
    mockRepository.ReplayAll();

    someClass.SomeMethod("What you put here doesnt really matter because the stub will always return false");

    l.AssertWasCalled(l => l.Log("Invalid string"));
}

No terms defined in terms of themselves :)

Disclaimer: I wrote all this in a text editor, so there might be some syntax errors in the code...

1

A mock is a surrogate that you can instruct to behave in a certain way. This is useful for testing where you want to eliminate a dependency by switching the actual instance with a mock object.

Unlike stubs mocks keep track of actual usage, so your test may verify that the mock was used as expected.

More info in Fowler's article here.

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