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I am using Raku for some computations, because it has nice numeric types. However, I have an issue with using '.raku'

say (1/6+1/6).raku
#<1/3>

We obtain this. However,

say (1/10+1/10).raku
#0.2

Is it a bug? I expected <1/5>. What happens?

3
  • 1
    Removed the perl tag as this does not pertain to the Perl programming language. – ikegami Mar 28 '20 at 0:31
  • This is because the denominator is divisible by 5 or by 2. When this happens, the decimal value is displayed by the .raku method. Unfortunately, if you want to always display by numerator / denominator, you will have to roll your own. Something akin to this should work in most cases: raku sub fraction (Rat $r) { my ($n, $d) = ($r.numerator, $r.denominator); ($n, $d) = (1, $d / $n) if $d %% $n; $n ~ '/' $d } This makes this possible: (1/10 + 1/10).&fraction # 1/5 Hope that helps. – Xliff Dec 20 '20 at 3:10
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    Since some fool at SO decided that comments cannot be editable after 5 minutes, here is a repl.it that you can play with – Xliff Dec 20 '20 at 3:19
13

In Raku, 0.2 constructs a Rat, and thus produces the very same result as writing 1/5 (which will be constant folded) or <1/5> (the literal form). You only get floating point in the case of specifying an exponent (for example, 2e-1).

The .raku (formerly known as the .perl) method's job is to produce something that will roundtrip and produce the same value if EVAL'd. In the case of 1/5, that can be exactly represented as a decimal, so it will produce 0.2. It only resorts to the fractional representation when a decimal form would not round-trip.

You can always recover the numerator and denominator using the .numerator and .denominator methods to format as you wish. Additionally .nude method returns a list of the numerator and denominator, which one can join with a / if wanted:

say (1/6+1/6).nude.join("/");     # 1/3
say (1/10+1/10).nude.join("/");   # 1/5
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    @user0721090601 Based on how Larry has mentioned it in interviews, I would bet on it being intentional. – Brad Gilbert Apr 1 '20 at 0:13
  • @BradGilbert I kind of assumed someone would pop in to say that when I made the comment :-) – user0721090601 Apr 1 '20 at 0:17
2

Hi @milou123 I was also a bit surprised that raku reverts to decimal representation - I can see that some contexts - such as teaching fractional arithmetic would benefit from having a "keep as rat" mode. Having said that, ultimately it makes sense that there is only one way to .raku something and that decimal is the default representation.

Of course, with raku, you can also just change the language a bit. In this case, I have invented a new '→' postfix operator...

multi postfix:<→> ( Rat:D $r ) { $r.nude.join("/") }
say (1/5+1/5)→;    # 2/5

I am not smart enough to work out if the built in 'raku' method can be overridden in a similar way, would be keen to see advice on how to do that concisely...

2
  • The built in can be wrapped. Should look something like Rat.^find_method('raku').wrap( anon method raku { self.nude.join: '/' }) – user0721090601 Oct 20 '20 at 13:39
  • @userN - ah - yes that’s exactly what i had in mind - many thanks!! – p6steve Oct 21 '20 at 17:26
2

try this in Julia:

julia> 1 // 10 + 1 // 10
1//5

julia> typeof(1 // 10 + 1 // 10)
Rational{Int64}


julia> 1 // 2 + 1 // 3
5//6

julia> typeof(1 // 2 + 1 // 3)
Rational{Int64}

in the Rat.pm6 implemention, we can only call .raku method on Rat type to get the expected format:

multi method raku(Rat:D: --> Str:D) {
        if $!denominator == 1 {
            $!numerator ~ '.0'
        }
        else {
            my $d = $!denominator;
            unless $d == 0 {
                $d = $d div 5 while $d %% 5;
                $d = $d div 2 while $d %% 2;
            }
            if $d == 1 and (my $b := self.base(10,*)).Numeric === self {
                $b;
            }
            else {
                '<' ~ $!numerator ~ '/' ~ $!denominator ~ '>'
            }
        }
}

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