10

I have code that finds and prints out matches of a pattern as going over the container of strings. Printing is performed in the function foo that is templated

The code

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <tuple>
#include <utility>

template<typename Iterator, template<typename> class Container>
void foo(Iterator first, Container<std::pair<Iterator, Iterator>> const &findings)
{
    for (auto const &finding : findings)
    {
        std::cout << "pos = " << std::distance(first, finding.first) << " ";
        std::copy(finding.first, finding.second, std::ostream_iterator<char>(std::cout));
        std::cout << '\n';
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> strs = { "hello, world", "world my world", "world, it is me" };
    std::string const pattern = "world";
    for (auto const &str : strs)
    {
        std::vector<std::pair<std::string::const_iterator, std::string::const_iterator>> findings;
        for (std::string::const_iterator match_start = str.cbegin(), match_end;
             match_start != str.cend();
             match_start = match_end)
        {
            match_start = std::search(match_start, str.cend(), pattern.cbegin(), pattern.cend());
            if (match_start != match_end)
                findings.push_back({match_start, match_start + pattern.size()});
        }
        foo(str.cbegin(), findings);
    }

    return 0;
}

When compiling I've got an error that types deduction has failed due to inconsistency of iterators being provided, their types turn out to be diverse.

GCC compilation error:

prog.cpp:35:9: error: no matching function for call to 'foo'
        foo(str.cbegin(), findings);
        ^~~
prog.cpp:10:6: note: candidate template ignored: substitution failure [with Iterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<const char *, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char> >]: template template argument has different template parameters than its corresponding template template parameter
void foo(Iterator first, Container<std::pair<Iterator, Iterator>> const &findings)
     ^
1 error generated.

Clang's output:

main.cpp:34:9: error: no matching function for call to 'foo'
        foo(str.cbegin(), findings);
        ^~~
main.cpp:9:6: note: candidate template ignored: substitution failure [with Iterator = std::__1::__wrap_iter<const char *>]: template template argument has different template parameters than its corresponding template template parameter
void foo(Iterator first, Container<std::pair<Iterator, Iterator>> const &findings)

What am I not catching? Is my utilization of template template types deduction wrong and appears an abuse from the standard's point of view? Neither g++-9.2 with listdc++11 nor clang++ with libc++ are able to compile this.

10

Your code should work fine since C++17. (It compiles with gcc10.)

The template template argument std::vector has two template parameters (the 2nd one has default argument std::allocator<T>), but the template template parameter Container has only one. Since C++17 (CWG 150), the default template arguments are allowed for template template argument to match template template parameter with fewer template parameters.

template<class T> class A { /* ... */ };
template<class T, class U = T> class B { /* ... */ };

template<template<class> class P> class X { /* ... */ };

X<A> xa; // OK
X<B> xb; // OK in C++17 after CWG 150
         // Error earlier: not an exact match

Before C++17, you can define the 2nd template parameter with default argument for the template template parameter Container, e.g.

template<typename Iterator, template<typename T, typename Alloc=std::allocator<T>> class Container>
void foo(Iterator first, Container<std::pair<Iterator, Iterator>> const &findings)

Or apply parameter pack.

template<typename Iterator, template<typename...> class Container>
void foo(Iterator first, Container<std::pair<Iterator, Iterator>> const &findings)
| improve this answer | |
1

In some versions of C++, Container can't match std::vector, because std::vector isn't actually a template <typename> class. It's a template <typename, typename> class where the second parameter (the allocator type) has a default template argument.

Although it could work to add another template parameter typename Alloc make the function parameter Container<std::pair<Iterator, Iterator>, Alloc>, that could be an issue for other container types.

But since your function doesn't actually use the template template parameter Container, there's no need to require such a complicated template argument deduction, with all the gotchas and limitations of deducing a template template argument:

template<typename Iterator, class Container>
void foo(Iterator first, Container const &findings);

This also doesn't require Iterator to be deduced as the exact same type in three different places. Meaning it will be valid to pass a X::iterator as first and a container containing X::const_iterator or vice versa, and template argument deduction could still succeed.

The one slight drawback is that if another template uses SFINAE techniques to try to determine whether a signature of foo is valid, that declaration would match nearly anything, like foo(1.0, 2). This often isn't important for a specific-purpose function, but it's nice to be more restrictive (or "SFINAE-friendly") at least for general purpose functions. We could add a basic restriction with something like:

// Require Container is container-like (including raw array or std::initializer_list)
// and its values have members first and second of the same type,
// which can be compared for equality with Iterator.
template <typename Iterator, class Container>
auto foo(Iterator first, Container const &findings)
    -> std::void_t<decltype(first == std::begin(findings)->first),
           std::enable_if_t<std::is_same_v<std::begin(findings)->first, 
                            std::begin(findings)->second>>>;
| improve this answer | |
  • Actually I always want to ensure that the container provided in the parameters conveys values as std::pair of iterators that have the type of the first parameter, therefore the first simplification of the template function you offered cannot seem to meet my requirements, in opposite to this the second your solution with SFINAE will do. Anyway, thank you very much – dannftk Mar 29 at 18:04

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