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Using Python 3.8.1

New programmer, so forgive me if the jargon's a bit off. I'm currently working on a learning exercise from a book where the intent is to take a user's input and return a tuple with the part of speech the user's input matches (eg "go" would return ("verb","go")). I set up an if-then structure that works, but I'm wondering if I can instead use a dictionary to accomplish the same end while making it so adding new categories would be simpler (instead of adding a set and a tree in the if-then, I can just create a dictionary entry).

Part of the idea is if the user's input is not in a set of keywords I want to return an error, so using something like dict.get() isn't exactly what I want here as I don't want a null value to be returned.

EDIT: To clarify, I'm looking for some way where I can feed a function a string and have that function return the key value of a dictionary where the string is in the key's associated set. More verbosely, if I have this dictionary:

lexicon = {
    'direction': {'east','south','north','west'}
}

I want to be able to do something like this:

lexicon.???('south') == 'direction'

Where ??? is a function that I don't know if it exists or not.


Here's what I currently have:

directions = {'north','south','east','west'}
verbs = {'go','kill','eat'}
stops = {'the','in','of'}
nouns = {'bear','princess'}

def scan(input_string):
    words = input_string.split()
    result = []

    for word in words:
        if word in directions:
            result.append(('direction', word))
        elif word in verbs:
            result.append(('verb', word))
        elif word in stops:
            result.append(('stop', word))
        elif word in nouns:
            result.append(('noun', word))
        else:
            try:
                word = int(word)
                result.append(('number',word))
            except:
                result.append(('error',word))

    return result
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  • 1
    You can use a dictionary, like you asked - just google 'Python dictionary' and it should be pretty self-evident; if you have any issues with your code once you switch your code over to it, feel free to come ask about it. You can also do stuff like if "key" in some_dict: to detect if your key is missing.
    – Grismar
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 0:11
  • I'm still struggling with how to return a key if an input is inside a set. Eg, if I have this as my dictionary: ``` lexicon = { 'direction':{'north','south','east','west'}, 'verb':{'go','kill','eat'}, 'stop':{'the','in','of'}, 'noun':{'bear','princess'} } ``` How do I get 'direction' if I input 'east'?
    – Martin
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 0:20
  • I'm not sure I understand, can you clarify what you're trying to do?
    – AMC
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 0:36
  • I added some clarification in the OP, hope it helps!
    – Martin
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 0:59

4 Answers 4

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Yes, it's pretty simple actually, but maybe not intuitive to a new coder. First make the dict of categories and associated words, then simply lookup each word while keeping track of the category label.

categories = {
    'direction': {'north', 'south', 'east', 'west'},
    'verb': {'go', 'kill', 'eat'},
    'conjunction': {'the', 'in', 'of'},
    'noun': {'bear', 'princess'},
    }

...
for category, wordset in categories.items():
    if word in wordset:
        result.append((category, word))

BTW, you can simplify scan by putting the categorization into a function, and you can improve a few other things:

def categorize(word):
    for category, wordset in categories.items():
        if word in wordset:
            return (category, word)

    try:
        word = int(word)  # Keep the try-block slim
    except ValueError:  # Bare "except" is bad practice
        return ('error', word)
    else:
        return ('number', word)

def scan(phrase):
    # Use a list comprehension instead of a bunch of appending
    return [categorize(word) for word in phrase.split()]

print(scan('go north princess'))
# -> [('verb', 'go'), ('direction', 'north'), ('noun', 'princess')]
print(scan('5 steps'))
# -> [('number', '5'), ('error', 'steps')]
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  • This is exactly what I'm looking for, thank you! This is definitely the other way around from how I was thinking about it initially but it works like a charm.
    – Martin
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 1:09
  • @Martin Welcome. You're right, you could actually do it the other way around, i.e. have a dict with word-category pairs, then dict[word] to get the category but catch KeyError. That would be much faster if you had a lot of categories. The only tricky part is building the dict since you wouldn't want to type each word's category manually. You could flip it like this: {word: cat for cat in categories for word in categories[cat]}
    – wjandrea
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 1:18
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You can use an assertion in order to check if the user wrote these keywords or it was something else. Here's a link that can be useful: https://wiki.python.org/moin/UsingAssertionsEffectively

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You can use the second argument of dict.get() to return a response in case the key is not in the dict. Setting to False you can reduce your decision tree:

data_dict = {'directions': [], 'verbs': [], ...}

if word in data_dict.get('direction', False):
    result.append(('direction', word))

Combine with a external for to iterate the keys in the dictionary (with data_dict.keys()) so you can reduce it ever more!

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Label the terms with their category


directions = {'north','south','east','west'}
verbs = {'go','kill','eat'}
stops = {'the','in','of'}
nouns = {'bear','princess'}

ctgs = (
    'directions',
    'verbs',
    'stops',
    'nouns'
)

vals = (
    directions,
    verbs,
    stops,
    nouns
)
d = {v: c for c, vc in zip(ctgs, vals) for v in vc}

def scan(input_string):
    words = input_string.split()
    result = []

    for word in words:
        ctg = d.get(word)
        if ctg is not None:
            result.append((ctg, word))
        else:
            try:
                word = int(word)
                result.append(('number',word))
            except ValueError:
                result.append(('error',word))

    return result

s = 'go west 3 jump'
print(scan(s))

produces

[('verbs', 'go'), ('directions', 'west'), ('number', 3), ('error', 'jump')]

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