8

This is problem36 from the Euler Project. Sum all of the numbers below a million that are palindromic in base 2 and base 10.

I'd originally tried solving it in a more functional style.

This runs in just under 6 seconds.

[1..1_000_000]
    .grep( * !%% 2 )
    .grep( -> $x { $x == $x.flip } )
    .grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) == $y.base(2).flip } )
    .sum.say

Surprisingly this took 12 seconds even though I'm only generating odd numbers and therefore skipping the test for even.

(1,3 ... 1_000_000)
    .grep( -> $x { $x == $x.flip } )
    .grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) == $y.base(2).flip } )
    .sum.say

This runs in about 3 seconds.

my @pals;
for (1,3 ... 1_000_000) -> $x {
    next unless $x == $x.flip;
    next unless $x.base(2) == $x.base(2).flip;
    @pals.push($x);
}

say [+] @pals;

I also noted that there is a significant difference between using

for (1,3 ... 1_000_000) -> $x { ...

and

for [1,3 ... 1_000_000] -> $x { ...

Anyone know why the streaming versions are so much slower than the iterative one? And, why would those two for loops be so different in performance?

12

The construct [...] is an array composer. It eagerly iterates the iterable found within it, and stores each value into the array. Only then do we proceed to do the iteration. That results in far more memory allocation and is less cache-friendly. By contrast, parentheses do nothing (aside from grouping, but they don't add any semantics beyond that). Thus:

[1..1_000_000]
    .grep( * !%% 2 )
    .grep( -> $x { $x == $x.flip } )
    .grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) == $y.base(2).flip } )
    .sum.say

Will allocate and set up a million element array and iterate it, while:

(1..1_000_000)
    .grep( * !%% 2 )
    .grep( -> $x { $x == $x.flip } )
    .grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) == $y.base(2).flip } )
    .sum.say

Runs rather faster, because it need not do that.

Further, the ... operator is currently far slower than the .. operator. It's not doomed to be that way forever, it's just received a lot less attention so far. Since .grep has also been decently well optimized, it turns out to be quicker to filter out the elements made by the range - for now, anyway.

Finally, using == to compare the (string) results of base and flip is not so efficient, since it parses them back into integers, when we could use eq and compare the strings:

(1 .. 1_000_000)
    .grep(* !%% 2)
    .grep( -> $x { $x eq $x.flip } )
    .grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) eq $y.base(2).flip } )
    .sum.say
1
  • Thanks for the response. The fastest result for me was the iterative one, in my post, after I replaced the '==' with 'eq' - it sped it up considerably. I noticed that I'm using version 2019.03 so I'll need to update it and see what kind of difference that makes when using grep. – jmcneirney Mar 30 '20 at 23:16
4

If you want something that is faster, you can write your own sequence generator.

gather {
  loop (my int $i = 1; $i < 1_000_000; $i += 2) {
    take $i
  }
}
.grep( -> $x { $x eq $x.flip } )
.grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) eq $y.base(2).flip } )
.sum.say

Which takes about 4 seconds.


Or to go even faster, you can create the Iterator object yourself.

class Odd does Iterator {
    has uint $!count = 1;

    method pull-one () {
        if ($!count += 2) < 1_000_000 {
            $!count
        } else {
            IterationEnd
        }
    }
}

Seq.new(Odd.new)
.grep( -> $x { $x == $x.flip } )
.grep( -> $y { $y.base(2) == $y.base(2).flip } )
.sum.say

Which only takes about 2 seconds.


Of course if you want to go as fast as possible, get rid of the sequence iteration entirely.

Also use native ints.

Also cache the base 10 string. (my $s = ~$x)

my int $acc = 0;
loop ( my int $x = 1; $x < 1_000_000; $x += 2) {
  next unless (my $s = ~$x) eq $s.flip;
  next unless $x.base(2) eq $x.base(2).flip;
  $acc += $x
}
say $acc;

Which gets it down to about 0.45 seconds.

(Caching the .base(2) didn't seem to do anything.)

This is probably close to the minimum without resorting to using nqp ops directly.


I tried writing a native int bit flipper, but it made it slower. 0.5 seconds.
(I did not come up with this algorithm, I only adapted it to Raku. I also added the +> $in.msb to fit this problem.)

I would guess that spesh is leaving in operations that don't need to be there.
Or maybe it isn't JITting very well.

It might be more performant for values larger than 1_000_000.
(.base(2).flip is O(log n) whereas this is O(1).)

sub flip-bits ( int $in --> int ) {
  my int $n =
       ((($in +& (my int $ = 0xaaaaaaaa)) +> 1) +| (($in +& (my int $ = 0x55555555)) +< 1));
  $n = ((($n  +& (my int $ = 0xcccccccc)) +> 2) +| (($n  +& (my int $ = 0x33333333)) +< 2));
  $n = ((($n  +& (my int $ = 0xf0f0f0f0)) +> 4) +| (($n  +& (my int $ = 0x0f0f0f0f)) +< 4));
  $n = ((($n  +& (my int $ = 0xff00ff00)) +> 8) +| (($n  +& (my int $ = 0x00ff00ff)) +< 8));
  ((($n +> 16) +| ($n+< 16)) +> (32 - 1 - $in.msb)) +& (my int $ = 0xffffffff);
}

…

  # next unless (my $s = ~$x) eq $s.flip;
  next unless $x == flip-bits($x);

You can even try to use multiple threads.

Note that this workload is entirely too little for this to be effective.
The overhead of using threads swamps out any benefit.

my atomicint $total = 0;

sub process ( int $s, int $e ) {
  # these are so the block lambda works properly
  # (works around what I think is a bug)
  my int $ = $s;
  my int $ = $e;

  start {
    my int $acc = 0;
    loop ( my int $x = $s; $x < $e; $x += 2) {
      next unless (my $s = ~$x) eq $s.flip;
      next unless $x.base(2) eq $x.base(2).flip;
      $acc += $x;
    }
    $total ⚛+= $acc;
  }
}


my int $cores = (Kernel.cpu-cores * 2.2).Int;

my int $per = 1_000_000 div $cores;
++$per if $per * $cores < 1_000_000;

my @promises;

my int $start = 1;
for ^$cores {
  my int $end = $start + $per - 2;
  $end = 1_000_000 if $end > 1_000_000;

  push @promises, process $start, $end;

#say $start, "\t", $end;

  $start = $end + 2;
}

await @promises;
say $total;

Which runs in about 0.63 seconds.
(I messed with the 2.2 value to find a near minimum time on my computer.)

1
  • my @pals; for (1,3 ... 1_000_000) -> $x { next unless $x eq $x.flip; next unless $x.base(2) eq $x.base(2).flip; @pals.push($x); } say [+] @pals; Taking the iterative version of my post and replacing '==' with 'eq' ran in .5 seconds. – jmcneirney Apr 2 '20 at 2:06

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