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I've reduced my problem to the following code:

struct Struct<'a, 'b, T> {
    a: &'a T,
    b: &'b T,
}

trait Trait<'a, 'b, T> {
    fn a(&self) -> &'a T;
    fn b(&self) -> &'b T;
}

impl<'a, 'b, T> Trait<'a, 'b, T> for Struct<'a, 'b, T> {
    fn a(&self) -> &'a T {
        self.a
    }
    fn b(&self) -> &'b T {
        self.b
    }
}

struct Confused<T> {
    field: T,
}

impl<T> Confused<T> {
    fn foo<'a, 'b>(&'a self, param: &Struct<'a, 'b, T>) -> &'a T {
        param.b();
        param.a()
    }

    fn bar<'a, 'b, U: Trait<'a, 'b, T>>(&'a self, param: &U) -> &'a T {
        param.b();
        param.a()
    }
}

The function foo is okay, but when I replace the concrete type Struct<'a, 'b, T> with a generic type U: Trait<'a, 'b, T>, I get the following error:

error[E0309]: the parameter type `T` may not live long enough
  --> src/lib.rs:31:15
   |
24 | impl<T> Confused<T> {
   |      - help: consider adding an explicit lifetime bound `T: 'b`...
...
31 |         param.b();
   |               ^
   |
note: ...so that the reference type `&'b T` does not outlive the data it points at
  --> src/lib.rs:31:15
   |
31 |         param.b();
   |               ^

The suggestion to add the bound T: 'b doesn't make sense to me, since 'b is a parameter to bar(). How can I fix bar() to accept any implementation of Trait<'a, 'b, T> as a parameter?

  • What is your question? You've only stated facts so far. – Shepmaster Mar 31 at 14:55
  • I have added my question explicitly – Tavian Barnes Mar 31 at 14:59
  • You state that the bound the compiler suggests doesn't make sense to you, but what prevents you from adding it anyway, even though you don't understand it? – Shepmaster Mar 31 at 15:02
  • Adding 'b as a lifetime parameter to Confused changes the meaning of the code. foo() and bar() are generic over both lifetimes. Why is that okay for foo() but not bar()? – Tavian Barnes Mar 31 at 15:08
  • Why would you add the constraint to Confused instead of to bar? – Shepmaster Mar 31 at 15:11
2

When you write a generic type such as:

struct Foo<'a, T> {
    a: &'a T,
}

Rust automatically adds an implicit restriction of the type T: 'a, because your reference to T cannot live longer than T itself. This is automatic because your type would not work without it.

But when you do something like:

impl<T> Foo {
    fn bar<'a, 'b>() -> &'a T {/*...*/}
}

there is an automatic T: 'a but not a T: 'b because there is no &'b T anywhere.

The solution is to add those constraints by yourself. In your code it would be something like this:

impl<T> Confused<T> {
    fn bar<'a, 'b, U: Trait<'a, 'b, T>>(&'a self, param: &U) -> &'a T
    where
        T: 'b, //<--- here!
    {
        param.b();
        param.a()
    }
}

| improve this answer | |
  • So for foo(), the T: 'b constraint is implied by Struct<'a, 'b, T>. But the same doesn't happen for U: Trait<'a, 'b, T>, even though it would be impossible to implement that trait if that bound did not hold. – Tavian Barnes Mar 31 at 15:29
  • @TavianBarnes: Yes, I think it is exactly that. The funny thing is that you cannot implement Trait<a, b, T> unless T: 'a + 'b, but you can use the Trait<a, b, T> even though T: !'b as long as you do not call Trait::b. In your original code, if you remove the call to param.b() it will compile just fine. – rodrigo Mar 31 at 15:41
  • It looks like this might be fixed by github.com/rust-lang/rfcs/pull/2089 which is not yet implemented. – Tavian Barnes Mar 31 at 15:50
  • @TavianBarnes: I don't think this change applies to your code. Note that any automatic requirement added to your original code would be a breaking change, as currently your code would compile without the param.b(), but adding a T: 'b automaticall would break it. – rodrigo Mar 31 at 16:26
  • What would the added implied bound break exactly? Just { param.a() } would continue to compile, and my existing code would unbreak. There can't be any callers of bar() that would be broken by the new bound since all instances of Trait satisfy it already. – Tavian Barnes Mar 31 at 17:02

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