11

I have two apps that I'm trying to unify. One was written by me and another is a CMS I am using. My authentication happens in the one I coded and I'd like my CMS to know that information. The problem is that the CMS uses one session name, and my app uses another. I don't want to make them use the same one due to possible namespace conflicts but I'd still like to get this information.

Is it possible to switch session names in the middle of a request? For example, doing something like this in the CMS:

//session_start already called by cms by here

$oldSession = session_name();
session_name("SESSION_NAME_OF_MY_APP");
session_start();

//get values needed
session_name($oldSession);
session_start();

Would something like this work? I can't find anything in the docs or on the web if something like this would work after session_start() has been called. Tips?

Baring this solution, I've been considering just developing a Web Service to get the information, but obviously just getting it from the session would be preferable as that information is already available.

Thanks!

5

Here is a working example how to switch between sessions:

session_id('my1session');
session_start();
echo ini_get('session.name').'<br>';
echo '------------------------<br>';
$_SESSION['value'] = 'Hello world!';
echo session_id().'<br>';
echo $_SESSION['value'].'<br>';
session_write_close();
session_id('my2session');
session_start();
$_SESSION['value'] = 'Buy world!';
echo '------------------------<br>';
echo session_id().'<br>';
echo $_SESSION['value'].'<br>';
session_write_close();
session_id('my1session');
session_start();
echo '------------------------<br>';
echo $_SESSION['value'];

Log will look like:


PHPSESSID
------------------------
my1session
Hello world!
------------------------
my2session
Buy world!
------------------------
Hello world!

So, as you can see, session variables saved and restored while changing session.

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  • 4
    Please don't mess with the session ID manually - this is what distinguishes one user from the other. If you manipulate session IDs by hand you allow session hijacking to occur, and that - for the uninitiated - is bad. – Guss Jan 8 '14 at 19:29
  • Instead of manually setting session_id, you can call session_regenerate_id() (but you have to do it after the second session_start()). Doing this change and removing both session_id() calls from your code, you get the same effect without messing with session ids. Do note that this does not load an old session - all the data present in the "second session" is identical to the first session - it simply prevents the new data from being written to the old session. It does look like a start to build your own mechanism for managing exchangeable sessions. – Guss Mar 5 '14 at 12:54
3

Note: the answer below is not correct, please don't use or vote up. I've left it here as a place for discussion

You solution should work (not that I ever tried something like that), except that you have to manually close the previous session before any call to session_name() as otherwise it will silently fail.

You can try something like this:

session_write_close();
$oldsession = session_name("MY_OTHER_APP_SESSION");
session_start();

$varIneed = $_SESSION['var-I-need'];
session_write_close();
session_name($oldsession);
session_start;

There's no need to actually mess with the session ID value, either through PHP session ID manipulation routines or through manual cookie mangling - PHP will take care of all that itself and you shouldn't mess with that.

  • 1
    It seems to me, you can end up with two different session names that have the same id. If that happens, both sessions share the same data, even if they have different names. To avoid that, you may want to mess with the session id after all... – commonpike Jan 7 '14 at 14:03
  • 1
    I don't see how that could happen - unless you assume that two different clients may also get the same session ID "by mistake". This is because the way session_name() works is that it changes what cookie PHP uses to identify the session, and if that causes you to generate a new session (instead of loading an existing one), PHP will guarantee that it is using a new session ID - otherwise it will be easy to hijack sessions. – Guss Jan 8 '14 at 19:24
  • Also, messing around with the session ID is a sure way to open holes for session hijackers. If you do mess around with session IDs (please don't), don't assume you know how to generate session IDs and always use session_regenerate_id(). – Guss Jan 8 '14 at 19:25
  • In my tests this actually doesn't work. The second session_start() call will reopen the previously opened session... so whatever the session_id() was after the first session_start(). I have been searching and testing everywhere... you cannot switch sessions once you start. You can update the session id you can update the name, but the context and data will persist from your first session_start() call. – ajon Mar 4 '14 at 22:48
  • You are correct - this doesn't actually work. I'm not sure if it ever worked (though I'm usually good about testing my answers... sorry). As far as I can tell, session_start() will always reload the previous session started, even if you change the session name. Changing the session name before the second session_start() merely causes the creation of an additional session cookie with the same session ID (even if you use session_regenerate_id() before the second session_start()). I did not find a way to not have the first session loaded, though I'm pretty sure this is a bug in PHP. – Guss Mar 5 '14 at 12:43
2

I've been working on perfecting this and here is what I've come up with. I switch to a parent session using session names in my child apps and then back to my child app's session. The solution creates the parent session if it does not exist.

$current_session_id = session_id();
$current_session_name = session_name();

session_write_close();

$parent_session_name = 'NameOfParentSession';

// Does parent session exist?   
if (isset($_COOKIE[$parent_session_name])) {

    session_id($_COOKIE[$parent_session_name]);
    session_name($parent_session_name);
    session_start();

} else {
    session_name($parent_session_name);
    session_start();

    $success = session_regenerate_id(true);
}

$parent_session_id = session_id();

// Do some stuff with the parent $_SESSION 

// Switch back to app's session
session_write_close();
session_id($current_session_id);
session_name($current_session_name);
session_start();
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  • This worked for me! Changing back to the original session is important because otherwise magic session handling code at the end will be ran and things get weird! – Roel van Duijnhoven Sep 18 '14 at 11:32
1

session_regenerate _id()

The manual explains this pretty well but here's some example from the manual

session_start();

$old_sessionid = session_id();

session_regenerate_id();

$new_sessionid = session_id();

echo "Old Session: $old_sessionid<br />";
echo "New Session: $new_sessionid<br />";

print_r($_SESSION);
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  • 3
    -1: This only changes the session id, but the session still is the same. – hakre Oct 2 '11 at 22:24
0

You should use session_id, you can use it to set / get the session id (or name).

So instead of using session_name (in your pseudo code), use session_id.

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0

Zend_Session offers Namespacing for sessions.

Zend_Session_Namespace instances are accessor objects for namespaced slices of $_SESSION. The Zend_Session component wraps the existing PHP ext/session with an administration and management interface, as well as providing an API for Zend_Session_Namespace to persist session namespaces. Zend_Session_Namespace provides a standardized, object-oriented interface for working with namespaces persisted inside PHP's standard session mechanism. Support exists for both anonymous and authenticated (e.g., "login") session namespaces.

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0

It is possible. But I think you have to do the session handling yourself:

session_name('foo');
// start first session
session_start();

// …

// close first session
session_write_close();

session_name('bar');
// obtain session id for the second session
if (ini_get('session.use_cookies') && isset($_COOKIE[session_name()])) {
    session_id($_COOKIE[session_naem()]);
} else if (ini_get('session.use_trans_sid') && !ini_get('session.use_only_cookies') && isset($_REQUEST[session_name()])) {
    session_id($_REQUEST[session_naem()]);
}
// start second session
session_start();

// …

But note that you might do some of the other session handling things like cookie setting as well. I don’t know if PHP does this in this case too.

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