0

I'm trying to create a function that turns text into pig Latin: simple text transformation that modifies each word moving the first character to the end and appending "ay" to the end. But all I get is an empty list. Any tips?

def pig_latin(text):
  say = ""
  words = text.split()
  for word in words:
    endString = str(word[1]).upper()+str(word[2:])
    them = endString, str(word[0:1]).lower(), 'ay'
    word = ''.join(them)
    return word

print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"
10
  • Do you want to return word instead of words? It might break anyway
    – Chris
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:31
  • 6
    Why do you split say instead of text?
    – emremrah
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:32
  • I'm not sure I understand the question. If I return word I get an error: Error on line 13: print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay" Error on line 11: return word UnboundLocalError: local variable 'word' referenced before assignment
    – DanDan
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:34
  • As it seems to me, you are probably splitting the wrong string in the third line. Isn't it that you intend to split string-variable 'text' into 'words', instead of the kinda empty string 'say'?
    – Daniel B.
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:35
  • @emremrah because say is the string I want to split isn't it? If I split text I get: you fun
    – DanDan
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:36

17 Answers 17

4
def pig_latin(text):
  words = text.split()
  pigged_text = []

  for word in words:
    word = word[1:] + word[0] + 'ay'
    pigged_text.append(word)

  return ' '.join(pigged_text)

print(pig_latin("hello how are you"))

Outputs: ellohay owhay reaay ouyay

1
  • Actually my answer is nearly identical as @ventaquil, I didn't noticed that. Since he/she answered first, you can select his/her answer as the accepted answer.
    – emremrah
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:47
1

I tried this and it worked for me


def pig_latin(text):
  say = []

  # Separate the text into words

  words = text.split()
  for word in words:

    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list

    word = word[1:] + word[0] + "ay"
    say.append(word)

    # Turn the list back into a phrase

  return " ".join(say)

print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"

print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"


Open for suggestions

1
def pig_latin(text):
  say = []
  # Separate the text into words
  words = text.split(" ")
  for word in words:
    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
    say.append(word[1:]+word[0]+'ay')
    # Turn the list back into a phrase
  return " ".join(x for x in say)
0

Works for me

def pig_latin(sentence):
    output = []
    for word in sentence.split(" "):
        word = word[1:] + word[0] + "ay"
        output.append(word)
    return " ".join(output)
0

Just use a list comprehension on each word then join it back together.

edit: this solution have issues with multiple spaces, like when people put two spaces after a colon: !

def dowork(sentence):

    def pigword(word):
        return "".join([word[1:], word[0], "ay"])

    return " ".join([pigword(word) for word in sentence.split()])


dataexp = [
    ("hello how are you","ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"),
    ("programming in python is fun","rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay")
    ]

for inp, exp in dataexp:
    got = dowork(inp)
    msg = "exp :%s:  for %s \n      got :%s:" % (exp, inp, got)
    if exp == got:
        print("good! %s" % msg)
    else:
        print("bad ! %s" % msg)

output

good! exp :ellohay owhay reaay ouyay:  for hello how are you
      got :ellohay owhay reaay ouyay:
good! exp :rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay:  for programming in python is fun
      got :rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay:
2
  • Why would you need a nested function? ' '.join([x[1:]+x[0]+'ay' for x in 'hello world'.split()])
    – Chris
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:40
  • 1
    well, it doesn't have to be nested. but I like making it into its own function to separate concerns. to each his own.
    – JL Peyret
    Apr 2 '20 at 0:41
0

Here is a solution that worked in my case:

   def pig_latin(text):
      # Separate the text into words
        words = text.split()
        #creating a new empty list called pig
        pig=[]
        # creating a for loop to alter every word in words
        for word in words:
            
            """here we are assigning the altered word to a new variable pigged_word. The we can remove first word alone from the original word usin
                indexing and add/concat the letter at zeroth index (1st letter) back to the
                    word and add/concat new string 'ay' at end """
            
            pigged_word=word[1:]+word[0]+'ay'
            #append the altered words to the list
            # use append instead of insert since you can add word to end of list
            pig.append(pigged_word)
            #now convert it back to 
        return (' '.join(pig))
            
    print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
    print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"

Kindly try to understand the question and solve. Splitting the say variable won't work , ideally you'll have to split the text into pieces and even then you don't have to split with " "

0

Based on Herman Singh's answer, but omitting the anti-pattern (might be a bit strong to call it that) of creating an empty list and appending to it in a for-loop.

def pig_latin(text):
    words = [
        word[1:] + word[0] + "ay"
        for word in text.split()
    ]
    return " ".join(words)


print(pig_latin("hello how are you"))  # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun"))  # Should be "rogrammingpay n

Which can be reduced to a single line, but I think it doesn't aid readability.

def pig_latin(text):
    return " ".join([word[1:] + word[0] + "ay" for word in text.split()])


print(pig_latin("hello how are you"))  # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun"))  # Should be "rogrammingpay siay unfay
0
def pig_latin(text):
  # Separate the text into words
  words = text.split()
  newWord = []
  for word in words:
    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
    n = ""
    for char in range(len(word)-1, -1, -1):
      if(char == 0) :
        n+= (word[char]+"ay")
      n += word[char]
    newWord.append(n)    
    # Turn the list back into a phrase
  return " ".join(newWord)
    
print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"
0
def pig_latin(text):
  say = ""
  words = text.split()
  for word in words:
    word=word[1:] + word[0] + "ay" + " "
    say +=word
  return say
        
print(pig_latin("hello how are you"))
1
  • Welcome to StackOverflow! While this answer may solve the OP's issues, it's recommended to provide an explanation about the written code to make your answer more understandable for the community and also to improve its quality
    – xKobalt
    Aug 25 '20 at 6:57
0

Simply use a list comprehension for compactness and simplicity:

’ ‘.join([word[1:] + word[0] + ‘ay’ for word in text.split(‘ ‘)])

0

def pig_latin(text):

say = ""
  pig_list= []
  # Separate the text into words
  words = text.split(' ')
  for word in words:
    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
    word = word[1:] + word[0] + "ay"
    # print(word)
    pig_list.append(word)
    # Turn the list back into a phrase
    say = ' '.join(pig_list)
  return say
0

Solution without .join and .append:

def pig_latin(text):
  say = ""
  words = text.split()
  for word in words:
    pig_word = word[1:] + word[0] + "ay "
    say += pig_word
  return say
        
print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"
0
def pig_latin(text):
  say = ""
  # Separate the text into words
  words = text.split()
  for word in words:
    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
    say += word[1:] + word[0] + "ay "
    # Turn the list back into a phrase
  return say.rstrip(" ")

print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"
0
def pig_latin(text):
    say = ""
    str=[]
  # Separate the text into words
    words = text.split()
   for word in words:
     # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
      say=word[1:]+word[:1]+"ay"
      str.append(say)
      # Turn the list back into a phrase
      joined=" ".join(str)
      return joined
    
print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay 
ythonpay siay unfay"
0
def pig_latin(text):
  say = ""
  # Separate the text into words
  words = text.split()
  for word in words:
    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
    say = say + word[1:] +word[0] +"ay "
    # Turn the list back into a phrase
  return "".join(say)

print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"
-1
def pig_latin(text):
  say = ""
  # Separate the text into words
  words = text.split()
  for word in words:
    # Create the pig latin word and add it to the list
    say += " {}{}ay".format(word[1:], word[0])
    # Turn the list back into a phrase
  return say
    
print(pig_latin("hello how are you")) # Should be "ellohay owhay reaay ouyay"
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun")) # Should be "rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay"
-1

Using the following code:

def pig_latin(texts):
    return ' '.join([text.replace(text[0],'') + text[0]+'ay' for text in texts.split()])

print(pig_latin("hello how are you"))
print(pig_latin("programming in python is fun"))

will get the desired result:

ellohay owhay reaay ouyay
rogrammingpay niay ythonpay siay unfay
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