15

Let's say we have an entity class that looks like this:

public class SerializedEntity
{
    public JsonDocument Payload { get; set; }

    public SerializedEntity(JsonDocument payload)
    {
        Payload = payload;
    }
}

According to npsql this generates a table with column payload of type jsonb for this class which is correct.

Now what I would like to do is take any class instance and store it as payload in this table e.g.:

public class Pizza {
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Size { get; set; }
}

should then be possible to be retrieved as an object with following structure:

{Name: "name", Size: 10}

So I need something like this:

var pizza = new Pizza("Margharita", 10);
var se = new SerializedEntity(someConverter.method(pizza))
7
  • What framework and version are you on? There's Newtonsoft Json.NET or System.Text.Json. But availability may depend on framework/version.
    – Fildor
    Apr 2, 2020 at 11:15
  • Entity Framework core 3.1.2
    – pbn
    Apr 2, 2020 at 11:16
  • Then maybe have a look into this: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/serialization/…
    – Fildor
    Apr 2, 2020 at 11:17
  • ^^ Which is only about serializing into string ... give me a minute ...
    – Fildor
    Apr 2, 2020 at 11:41
  • Turns out, from object to JsonDocument is not as straight forward as I first thought. Upvoting Question.
    – Fildor
    Apr 2, 2020 at 11:59

5 Answers 5

14

You can use JsonSerializer.SerializeToDocument which was added in .NET 6. In your case you would end up with this:

var pizza = new Pizza("Margharita", 10);
var se = new SerializedEntity(JsonSerializer.SerializeToDocument(pizza))
2
  • +1 brilliant! Here's a link to JsonSerializer.Write.Document.cs for anyone interested in how the underlying implementation works, especially the WriteDocument() method which seems to use the "serialize then parse" approach shown by other answers (though more efficiently).
    – Eric Mutta
    Oct 30, 2022 at 23:32
  • To go the other way round (from JsonDocument to an object) there's no DeserializeFromDocument() method, but there are several overloads of the Deserialize() method like this one that do the trick.
    – Eric Mutta
    Oct 30, 2022 at 23:43
6

With System.Text.Json it's a little awkward but possible:

using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Serialization;

var pizza = new Pizza("Margharita", 10);
var se = new SerializedEntity(JsonDocument.Parse(JsonSerializer.Serialize(pizza)));

It has been built-in to dotnet core since (I think) v3.0, so you do not need any additional 3rd party libs. Just don't forget the usings.

There may be some tricks to get the parsing a little more efficient, though (using async API, perhaps or as Magnus suggests by serializing to binary using SerializeToUtf8Bytes).

I haven't been able to find any approach that goes directly from T or object to JsonDocument. And I cannot believe this is not possible somehow. Please leave a comment if you know how that works or add your answer.

5
  • 1
    The output of JsonSerializer.Serialize is a string, whereas my constructor takes JsonDocument. I can convert an object to string and then use JsonDocument.Parse to create a JsonDocument, but since I want to save it later to the db I guess it will be serialized again.
    – pbn
    Apr 2, 2020 at 11:35
  • Edited to reflect your need to use JsonDocument @pbn
    – Fildor
    Apr 2, 2020 at 12:43
  • 2
    Note that JsonDocument is Disposable. learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… Apr 2, 2020 at 14:09
  • 1
    >> I haven't been able to find any approach that goes directly from T or object to JsonDocument System.Text.Json.JsonSerializer.SerializeToDocument
    – Lee Benson
    Jul 8, 2023 at 18:49
  • @LeeBenson Thx, I'll look into it!
    – Fildor
    Jul 12, 2023 at 16:04
3

Serailize it and than parse it to JsonDocument.

var doc = JsonDocument.Parse(JsonSerializer.SerializeToUtf8Bytes(
                new Pizza {Name = "Calzone", Size = 10}));
2
  • 1
    So, there's really no way around serialize/parse?
    – Fildor
    Apr 2, 2020 at 12:50
  • 1
    @Fildor Is seem the were thinking about it but abandoned the idea for now.
    – Magnus
    Apr 2, 2020 at 13:15
3

If your EF entity (SerializedEntity) will always have a Pizza as its serialized JSON document, then you can simply use POCO mapping - replace the JsonDocument property with a Pizza property, and map it to a jsonb column.

If the actual types you want vary (sometimes Pizza, sometimes something else), you can also map an object property to jsonb, and assign whatever you want to it. Npgsql will internally serialize any object to JSON:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using var ctx = new BlogContext();
        ctx.Database.EnsureDeleted();
        ctx.Database.EnsureCreated();

        ctx.FoodEntities.Add(new FoodEntity { SomeJsonFood = new Pizza { Name = "Napoletana" } });
        ctx.FoodEntities.Add(new FoodEntity { SomeJsonFood = new Sushi { FishType = "Salmon" } });
        ctx.SaveChanges();
    }
}

public class BlogContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<FoodEntity> FoodEntities { get; set; }

    protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
        => optionsBuilder.UseNpgsql("...");
}

public class FoodEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [Column(TypeName = "jsonb")]
    public object SomeJsonFood { get; set; }
}

public class Pizza
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Size { get; set; }
}

public class Sushi
{
    public string FishType { get; set; }
}
2
0

Final solution for me:

public class SerializedEntity
{
    public object? Payload { get; set; }

    public SerializedEntity(object? payload)
    {
        Payload = payload;
    }
}

and the EF configuration for it:

public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<SerializedEntity> builder)
{
    builder.Property(n => n.Payload).HasColumnType("jsonb").HasConversion(
        v => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v,
            new JsonSerializerSettings {NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore}),
        v => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<object?>(v,
            new JsonSerializerSettings {NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore}));
}

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