10

I have a div.outer and inside a div.inner, both with position: absolute; and backdrop-filter: blur(8px);.

https://jsbin.com/nihakiqocu/1/edit?html,css,output

Safari (left) gives the desired result – both divs blur what's behind them.

Chrome (right), however, only applies the blur of div.outer:

SafariChrome

I have a solution: adding another div inside div.outer and moving backdrop-filter: blur(8px); to that new div.

However, I would appreciate a solution that doesn't require changing the DOM from the first jsbin. Also, does anybody know what is causing this – is it a Chrome bug?

https://jsbin.com/rasudijame/1/edit?html,css,output

PS: it works on iOS's Chrome, but not on Android's Chrome and also not on Mac OS's Chrome

6
  • backdrop-filter has poor support: caniuse. – Daemon Beast Apr 2 '20 at 18:18
  • Have you tried using the -webkit- prefix? – Daemon Beast Apr 2 '20 at 18:19
  • Also, it works fine on iOS safari, chrome and Firefox. – Daemon Beast Apr 2 '20 at 18:21
  • I am using both -webkit- and the normal version. Oddly, it works on iOS's Chrome, but not on Android's Chrome and also not on Mac OS's Chrome (all current versions, which should support backdrop-filter, according to caniuse) – Tonald Drump Apr 2 '20 at 18:40
  • 2
    It's a tracked bug on Chrome, see: bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=993971 – Maometto Jun 9 '20 at 16:18
7

Place the backdrop filter on css pseudo element. This allows nested backdrop filters. Also you can use z-index: -1; to position your backdrop behind your elemets

div {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
}
.wrapper {
  position: absolute;
}
.outer, .inner {
  position: relative;
}
.outer::before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  -webkit-backdrop-filter: blur(8px);
  backdrop-filter: blur(8px);
}
.outer {
  background: rgba(255, 0, 0, .5);
}
.inner::before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  -webkit-backdrop-filter: blur(8px);
  backdrop-filter: blur(8px);
  
}
.inner {
  background: rgba(0, 0, 255, .5);
  top: 50px;
  left: 50px;
}
main {
  position: relative;
}
<main>
  <div class="wrapper">
    <div class="outer">
      <div class="inner"></div>
    </div>
  </div>

  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Accusamus in id quos, est voluptatibus minus porro sunt totam quod commodi odit maxime similique, dolorum aut quo atque. Deleniti, voluptas animi.</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Accusamus in id quos, est voluptatibus minus porro sunt totam quod commodi odit maxime similique, dolorum aut quo atque. Deleniti, voluptas animi.</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Accusamus in id quos, est voluptatibus minus porro sunt totam quod commodi odit maxime similique, dolorum aut quo atque. Deleniti, voluptas animi.</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Accusamus in id quos, est voluptatibus minus porro sunt totam quod commodi odit maxime similique, dolorum aut quo atque. Deleniti, voluptas animi.</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Accusamus in id quos, est voluptatibus minus porro sunt totam quod commodi odit maxime similique, dolorum aut quo atque. Deleniti, voluptas animi.</p>
</main>

And here is codepen

1
  • If this doesn't work for anyone, I found the solution for me was reducing (or removing) the z-index of an element lower in the stack. No idea why but a glass layer (z 1000) didn't work with an earlier sibling (z 100), but reducing the sibling to z 10 fixed it. – Mike Stop Continues Apr 19 at 18:06

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