0
class Proc
{
public:
    string schedulingAlgo;
    string procName;
    int quantum;
    int arrivalTime;
    int burstTime;
}

This is my class whose object i want to pass to another process using pipes using the write sys call

write(fd_admit_write,(char*)&procs, sizeof((char*)&procs));

And in the other process, I am trying to read this and convert it back into the Proc type using this

char buffer[15];
read(fd_admit_read,buffer,15);
Proc *pp = reinterpret_cast<Proc *>(buffer);

I know that the method I used for conversion is fine because I tried it independently but when I use it in pipes, the output of pp gets distorted.

8
  • Because strings contain pointers internally it's not possible to serialize them this way. It doesn't work within a process (you must have just got lucky) but it absolutely isn't going to work when sent to another process.
    – john
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 20:07
  • Proc * pp = reinterpret_cast<Proc >((char)&procs); This works fine Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 20:12
  • I really doubt it.
    – john
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 20:18
  • It is working, I've tried it multiple times, also if there is some other way please tell Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 20:23
  • It's simple to do, write the length of the string followed by it's characters, then read the same at the other end.
    – john
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

1

Processes do not share memory (generally). They do not see each others' memory. That is, you cannot have a pointer to a memory address in another process.

As far as I understand, you are sending a Proc* to another process. While Proc* points to a valid Proc object in the sending process, it will point to uninitialized memory in the receiving process. You have to actually send all the data needed for constructing a Proc object, and construct it on the receiver side.

Even if you sent the Proc object itself instead of a pointer to it, it would not work, because it has a string member variable, and a string contains a pointer to its data (except in case of small string optimization).

You can use a good binary protocol like msgpack or implement your own serialization/deserialization based on your needs.

2
  • I tried it using write(fd_admit_write, &procs, sizeof(procs)) and this worked Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:33
  • Try bigger strings (length > 50 for example)
    – sparik
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 11:31

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