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I am trying to write a c program that ask user some information about a brand and store it into linked list. But whenever user enters data it always overwrites the previous data, instead I wanted it to create new node and store it there. This is what I manage so far. How can I do it without using any temporary nodes.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int count = 1;

struct modelNode{

    char name[50];
    int year;
    int amount;
    struct modelNode *next;
};

struct modelNode * addModel(struct modelNode *p);
void getBestModel(struct modelNode *p);

int main(){
    int command;

    struct modelNode * modelList = NULL;
    do
    {
        printf("1. Add a model\n");
        printf("2. Display the model with the highest selling amount\n");
        printf("3. Exit\n");
        printf("Enter command: ");
        scanf("%d", &command);
        switch(command)
        {
            case 1:
            addModel(modelList);
            printf("test %s\n", modelList->name);
            //printf("test %s\n", modelList->next->name);
            break;
            case 2:
            printf("45\n");
            break;
            case 3:
            puts("Bye");
            break;
            default:
            printf("default\n");
        }

    }while(command != 3);
    return 0;
}

struct modelNode * addModel(struct modelNode *p){
    int iter = 0;
    while(iter<count)
    {
        p = (struct modelNode*)malloc(sizeof(struct modelNode));
        p->next=NULL;
        iter++;




    }

    printf("test %s\n", p->name);


    printf("Enter the name: ");
    scanf("%s", &p->name);
    printf("Enter the release year: ");
    scanf("%d", &p->year);
    printf("Enter the selling amount: ");
    scanf("%d", &p->amount);
    p->next=NULL;

    printf("test %s\n", p->name);
    count++;


}

}
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  • 2
    With p = (struct modelNode*)malloc(sizeof(struct modelNode)) you throw away the pointer to the start of your linked list. You need to (with a loop) go to the end of your linked list. Then create a new node with malloc and add it to the end of the list by setting the next-filed of the last node in the list to the pointer to your new node
    – Ackdari
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:17

2 Answers 2

1

The generic functions for adding a node to a linked list would be

typedef struct node_t {
    struct node_t* next;
} node_t;

node_t* add(node_t* list, node_t* new_node) {
    if (list == NULL) {
        return new_node;
    } else {
        node_t* tmp = list;
        while (tmp->next != NULL) {
            tmp = tmp->next;
        }
        tmp->next = new_node;

        return list;
    }
}

and you could use it like

node_t* list = NULL;

list = add(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));
list = add(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));
list = add(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));
list = add(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));

// list would now be a list of 4 nodes

and if you really don't want to use a tmp variable to walk the list, you can do it like this

void add_without_tmp(node_t* list, node_t* new_node) {
    if (list == NULL) {
        // some error handling
    } else {
        while(list->next != NULL) {
            list = list->next;
        }
        list->next = new_node;
    }
}

node_t* list = malloc(sizeof(node_t));

add_without_tmp(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));
add_without_tmp(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));
add_without_tmp(list, malloc(sizeof(node_t)));

// list would now be a list of 4 nodes

Edit: fixed the error with the declaration of node_t and added the missing * to the statement node_t* tmp = list;.

9
  • Upvoted, this is a much better way. You should also address OP's "How can i do it without using any temporary nodes." Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:27
  • 1
    He could just insert "at head" and if he wants to insert at the tail he can go recursively through the linked list and add at the end. No temp nodes this way
    – Souza
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:34
  • I think you're trying to insert the new_node at the end, if you traverse the list that way, won't you lose the pointer to the head of list?
    – Souza
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:37
  • 1
    @Souza A copy of the original head pointer is passed to that function. How will the original list be modified this way? Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:38
  • 1
    @ArdentCoder that was not a comment about the loss of any pointer but on his comment before that, just bad luck with comment order
    – Ackdari
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 10:43
1

This looks like a school exercise, so i doubt anyone here will solve it for you. But you should try to insert "at the head" , you don't need temp nodes.

  • Pass the [head] as a param of function addNodes:

Inside addNodes:

  • Create [new-node]

  • Set the "next" pointer from [new-node] to the [head]: [new-node]->next = [head]

  • Return [new-node]

Resulting linked list (head is the old-head) : [new-node] ----> [head]

If you do this twice you'll get this: [newer-node] -----> [new-node] ----> [head]

And so on....

If you want to insert as "tail" , you just need to traverse the linked list recursively, this way you don't use temp nodes.

If i missed the point, please leave a comment explaining further.

If someone finds this, i added the solution in the comments after all:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct node {
    int number;
    struct node* next;
} Node;

void addNode(Node * list, int n) {
    while(list->next) {
        list = list->next;
    }
    
    Node* new_node = malloc(sizeof(Node));

    new_node->next      = NULL;
    new_node->number    = n;
    list->next          = new_node;
}

void printLList(Node * *link){
    printf(" address inside (*link) %d , number inside head of link %d \n", (*link), (*link)->number);
    
    while((*link)){
        printf(" - %d - ", (*link)->number);
        *link = (*link)->next;
    }
    printf("\n\n");
}


void printLList2(Node * link){
    printf(" address inside link %d , number inside head of link %d \n", (link), link->number);
    while((link)){
        printf(" - %d - ", link->number);
        link = link->next;
    }
    printf("\n\n");
}


int main()
{

    Node* list = malloc(sizeof(Node));
    list->number = 42;
    list->next = NULL;

    addNode(list, 2);
    addNode(list, 3);
    addNode(list, 4);

    printLList2(list);
    printLList(&list);


}
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  • But how can i travers without using any temp node, i will lose my orginal list.
    – Carl
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 13:04
  • You don't lose it. I too forgot that C copies values by nature . Imagine this : If you pass changeVariable( a ), you send a copy of a, if you instead do changeVariable(&a) , you are passing the address and you can change its value. So if you send addNode( list, _ ) , you won't be able to change the original address inside variable list no matter what you do. You can do list = list->next . You're safe.
    – Souza
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 13:13
  • So if I send a copy of my node through function it will be a whole new node ? But then if i do list = list->next with loop shouldn't it change the orginial one aswell ?
    – Carl
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 13:20
  • You need to remember that node has only an address to a memory location, you don't have an actual "entire node" stored in that variable. So let's say node = 4242 , 4242 is only an address. If you use addNode(node, _ ) you are sending a copy of node. If you try to change the copy you will not change the original node that is why you can do node = (*node).next and if you do this, again, only changes the copy of node . BUT , if you access the struct content using the 4242 address, you can change that content . Remember, it is only an address that lives inside node.
    – Souza
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 13:35
  • @Carl This will help you understand what we are discussing: onlinegdb.com/Sk-i8aVP8 . Check the address inside each version. Try to change the order of printLList and printLList2. One of them destroys the list. The other doesn't .
    – Souza
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 14:21

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