50

If I have two different constant members variables, which both need to be initialized based on the same function call, is there a way to do this without calling the function twice?

For example, a fraction class where numerator and denominator are constant.

int gcd(int a, int b); // Greatest Common Divisor
class Fraction {
public:
    // Lets say we want to initialize to a reduced fraction
    Fraction(int a, int b) : numerator(a/gcd(a,b)), denominator(b/gcd(a,b))
    {

    }
private:
    const int numerator, denominator;
};

This results in wasted time, as the GCD function is called twice. You could also define a new class member, gcd_a_b, and first assign the output of gcd to that in the initializer list, but then this would lead to wasted memory.

In general, is there a way to do this without wasted function calls or memory? Can you perhaps create temporary variables in an initializer list? Thank you.

  • 5
    Do you have proof that "the GCD function is called twice"? It's mentioned twice, but that is not the same thing as a compiler emitting code that calls it twice. A compiler may deduce that it is a pure function and reuse its value at the second mention. – Eric Towers Apr 5 at 5:24
  • 6
    @EricTowers: Yes, compilers can sometimes work around the problem in practice for some cases. But only if they can see the definition (or some annotation in an object), otherwise no way to prove it's pure. You should compile with link-time optimization enabled, but not everyone does. And the function might be in a library. Or consider the case of a function that does have side-effects, and calling it exactly once is a matter of correctness? – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 17:36
  • @EricTowers Interesting point. I did actually attempt to check it by putting a print statement inside the GCD function, but now I realise that that would prevent it from being a pure function. – Qq0 Apr 5 at 18:55
  • @Qq0: You can check by looking at the compiler generated asm, e.g. using the Godbolt compiler explorer with gcc or clang -O3. But probably for any simple test implementation it would actually inline the function call. If you use __attribute__((const)) or pure on the prototype without providing a visible definition, it should let GCC or clang do common-subexpression elimination (CSE) between the two calls with the same arg. Note that Drew's answer works even for non-pure functions so it's much better and you should use it any time the func might not inline. – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 19:00
  • Generally, non-static const member variables are best avoided. One of the few areas where const everything doesn't often apply. For instance you can't assign class objects. You can emplace_back into a vector but only so long as the capacity limit doesn't kick in a resizing. – doug Apr 29 at 3:09
66

In general, is there a way to do this without wasted function calls or memory?

Yes. This can be done with a delegating constructor, introduced in C++11.

A delegating constructor is a very efficient way to acquire temporary values needed for construction before any member variables are initialized.

int gcd(int a, int b); // Greatest Common Divisor
class Fraction {
public:
    // Call gcd ONCE, and forward the result to another constructor.
    Fraction(int a, int b) : Fraction(a,b,gcd(a,b))
    {
    }
private:
    // This constructor is private, as it is an
    // implementation detail and not part of the public interface.
    Fraction(int a, int b, int g_c_d) : numerator(a/g_c_d), denominator(b/g_c_d)
    {
    }
    const int numerator, denominator;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • Out of interest, would the overhead from calling another constructor be significant? – Qq0 Apr 5 at 18:52
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    @Qq0 You can observe here that there is no overhead with modest optimizations enabled. – Drew Dormann Apr 5 at 19:22
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    @Qq0: C++ is designed around modern optimizing compilers. They can trivially inline this delegation, especially if you make it visible in the class definition (in the .h), even if the real constructor definition isn't visible for inlining. i.e. the gcd() call would inline into each constructor callsite, and leave just a call to the 3-operand private constructor. – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 19:47
10

The member vars are initialized by the order they are declared in the class decleration, hence you can do the following (mathematically)

#include <iostream>
int gcd(int a, int b){return 2;}; // Greatest Common Divisor of (4, 6) just to test
class Fraction {
public:
    // Lets say we want to initialize to a reduced fraction
    Fraction(int a, int b) : numerator{a/gcd(a,b)}, denominator(b/(a/numerator))
    {

    }
//private:
    const int numerator, denominator;//make sure that they are in this order
};
//Test
int main(){
    Fraction f{4,6};
    std::cout << f.numerator << " / " << f.denominator;
}

No need for calling another constructors or even making them.

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  • 6
    ok that works for GCD specifically, but many other use-cases probably can't derive the 2nd const from the args and the first. And as written this has one extra division which is another downside vs. ideal that the compiler might not optimize away. GCD might only cost one division so this might be nearly as bad as calling GCD twice. (Assuming that division dominates the cost of other operations, like it often does on modern CPUs.) – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 17:46
  • @PeterCordes but the other solution has an extra function call and allocates more instruction memory. – asmmo Apr 5 at 18:35
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    Are you talking about Drew's delegating constructor? That can obviously inline the Fraction(a,b,gcd(a,b)) delegation into the caller, leading to less total cost. That inlining is easier for the compiler to do than to undo the extra division in this. I didn't try it on godbolt.org but you could if you're curious. Use gcc or clang -O3 like a normal build would use. (C++ is designed around the assumption of a modern optimizing compiler, hence features like constexpr) – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 18:56
-3

@Drew Dormann gave a solution similar to what I had in mind. Since OP never mentions not being able to modify the ctor, this can be called with Fraction f {a, b, gcd(a, b)}:

Fraction(int a, int b, int tmp): numerator {a/tmp}, denominator {b/tmp}
{
}

Only this way there is no second call to a function, constructor or otherwise, so it's no wasted time. And it's no wasted memory since a temporary would have to be created anyway, so you may as well make good use of it. It also avoids an extra division.

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  • 3
    Your edit makes it not even answer the question. Now you're requiring the caller to pass a 3rd arg? Your original version using assignment inside the constructor body doesn't work for const, but does at least work for other types. And what extra division are you "also" avoiding? You mean vs. asmmo's answer? – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 17:40
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    Ok, removed my downvote now that you've explained your point. But this seems pretty obviously terrible, and requires you to manually inline some of the constructor work into every caller. This is the opposite of DRY (don't repeat yourself) and encapsulation of the class's responsibility / internals. Most people would not consider this an acceptable solution. Given that there is a C++11 way to do this cleanly, nobody should ever do this unless maybe they're stuck with an older C++ version, and the class has very few calls to this constructor. – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 19:41
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    @aconcernedcitizen: I don't mean for performance reasons, I mean for code-quality reasons. With your way, if you ever changed how this class worked internally you'd have to go find all the calls to the constructor and change that 3rd arg. That extra ,gcd(foo, bar) is extra code that could and therefore should be factored out of every callsite in the source. That's a maintainability / readability issue, not performance. The compiler will most likely inline it at compile time, which you want for performance. – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 19:50
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    @PeterCordes You're right, now I see my mind was fixed on the solution, and I disregarded everything else. Either way, the answer stays, if only for shaming. Whenever I'll have doubts about it, I'll know where to look for. – a concerned citizen Apr 5 at 19:53
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    Also consider the case of Fraction f( x+y, a+b ); To write it your way, you'd have to write BadFraction f( x+y, a+b, gcd(x+y, a+b) ); or use tmp vars. Or even worse, what if you want to write Fraction f( foo(x), bar(y) ); - then you'd need the call site to declare some tmp vars to hold return values, or call those functions again and hope the compiler CSEs them away, which is what we're avoiding. Do you want to debug the case of one caller mixing up the args to gcd so it's not actually the GCD of the first 2 args passed to the constructor? No? Then don't make that bug possible. – Peter Cordes Apr 5 at 19:54

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