I'm looking for a good JavaScript equivalent of the C/PHP printf() or for C#/Java programmers, String.Format() (IFormatProvider for .NET).

My basic requirement is a thousand separator format for numbers for now, but something that handles lots of combinations (including dates) would be good.

I realize Microsoft's Ajax library provides a version of String.Format(), but we don't want the entire overhead of that framework.

43 Answers 43

up vote 761 down vote accepted

Edit: From ES6 on you could use template strings:

let soMany = 10;
console.log(`This is ${soMany} times easier!`);
// "This is 10 times easier!

See Kim's answer below for details.

Original answer:

Try sprintf() for JavaScript.


Update    Ok, if you really want to do a simple format method on your own, don’t do the replacements successively but do them simultaneously.

Because most of the other proposals that are mentioned fail when a replace string of previous replacement does also contain a format sequence like this:

"{0}{1}".format("{1}", "{0}")

Normally you would expect the output to be {1}{0} but the actual output is {1}{1}. So do a simultaneously replacement instead like in fearphage’s suggestion.

  • 14
    It's been moved again: epeli.github.com/underscore.string – Maksymilian Majer Jun 8 '12 at 11:36
  • 12
    If only some simple number-to-string conversion is desired, num.toFixed() method might be enough! – heltonbiker Dec 17 '12 at 23:29
  • @MaksymilianMajer that seems to be something massively different. – Evan Carroll Apr 14 '14 at 21:51
  • @EvanCarroll you are right. At the time I wrote the comment the repository of sprintf() for JavaScript was not available. underscore.string has more features aside from sprintf which is based on sprintf() for JavaScript implementation. Other than that the library is an entirely different project. – Maksymilian Majer Apr 15 '14 at 7:41
  • 1
    This shouldn't be accepted answer anymore. As of ES6 this is built into the javascript language (both in browsers and NodeJS). See @Kim 's answer below. – Ryan Shillington Jul 2 at 19:17

Building on the previously suggested solutions:

// First, checks if it isn't implemented yet.
if (!String.prototype.format) {
  String.prototype.format = function() {
    var args = arguments;
    return this.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function(match, number) { 
      return typeof args[number] != 'undefined'
        ? args[number]
        : match
      ;
    });
  };
}

"{0} is dead, but {1} is alive! {0} {2}".format("ASP", "ASP.NET")

outputs

ASP is dead, but ASP.NET is alive! ASP {2}


If you prefer not to modify String's prototype:

if (!String.format) {
  String.format = function(format) {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
    return format.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function(match, number) { 
      return typeof args[number] != 'undefined'
        ? args[number] 
        : match
      ;
    });
  };
}

Gives you the much more familiar:

String.format('{0} is dead, but {1} is alive! {0} {2}', 'ASP', 'ASP.NET');

with the same result:

ASP is dead, but ASP.NET is alive! ASP {2}

  • 11
    the || trick doesn't work if args[number] is 0. Should do an explicit if() to see if (args[number] === undefined). – fserb Feb 19 '11 at 14:16
  • 4
    in the else statement of the shorthand if, why not just do "match" instead of "'{' + number + '}'". match should equal that string. – mikeycgto Jul 10 '11 at 4:40
  • 13
    @ckozl Your code reformat invalidates the answer. It changes the output of the code. Please test your code before applying edits. Thank you. – fearphage Feb 6 '14 at 14:05
  • 54
    @ckozl - Please do not repeatedly override the formatting of this answer against the will of the person who left it. I'm locking this for the next day, and if you wish to explain why you are doing this, please do so on Meta. – Brad Larson Feb 6 '14 at 15:33
  • 13
    The (!String.prototype.format) check is a bad idea unless dealing with polyfills, since it means that newer browsers can come along and break your website with an incompatible format method. I suggest removing it. – Simon Lindholm Apr 14 '14 at 13:28

It's funny because Stack Overflow actually has their own formatting function for the String prototype called formatUnicorn. Try it! Go into the console and type something like:

"Hello, {name}, are you feeling {adjective}?".formatUnicorn({name:"Gabriel", adjective: "OK"});

Firebug

You get this output:

Hello, Gabriel, are you feeling OK?

You can use objects, arrays, and strings as arguments! I got its code and reworked it to produce a new version of String.prototype.format:

String.prototype.formatUnicorn = String.prototype.formatUnicorn ||
function () {
    "use strict";
    var str = this.toString();
    if (arguments.length) {
        var t = typeof arguments[0];
        var key;
        var args = ("string" === t || "number" === t) ?
            Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments)
            : arguments[0];

        for (key in args) {
            str = str.replace(new RegExp("\\{" + key + "\\}", "gi"), args[key]);
        }
    }

    return str;
};

Note the clever Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments) call -- that means if you throw in arguments that are strings or numbers, not a single JSON-style object, you get C#'s String.Format behavior almost exactly.

"a{0}bcd{1}ef".formatUnicorn("foo", "bar"); // yields "aFOObcdBARef"

That's because Array's slice will force whatever's in arguments into an Array, whether it was originally or not, and the key will be the index (0, 1, 2...) of each array element coerced into a string (eg, "0", so "\\{0\\}" for your first regexp pattern).

Neat.

  • 283
    It's pretty cool to answer a question on stackoverflow with code from stackoverflow, +1 – Sneakyness Jan 18 '14 at 0:02
  • 5
    @JamesManning The regex allows the global flag (g), which can replace the same key more than once. In the example above, you could use {name} multiple times in the same sentence and have them all replaced. – Greggg Apr 24 '14 at 13:00
  • 2
    @DineiA.Rockenbach but the code for (arg in args) will define a global variable named arg. If you're not using var arg at the first line, then you should use for(var arg in args) to avoid defining the global variable. – RainChen Aug 22 '15 at 14:17
  • 2
    This seems awfully fragile, to be honest. What happens for instance if name is "blah {adjective} blah"? – sam hocevar Jan 16 '17 at 11:02
  • 2
    @ruffin “a little hyperbolic”? Code that is fooled into interpreting user data as format strings is an entire category of vulnerabilities. 98.44% is beyond mediocre. – sam hocevar Jun 5 '17 at 16:17

Number Formatting in JavaScript

I got to this question page hoping to find how to format numbers in JavaScript, without introducing yet another library. Here's what I've found:

Rounding floating-point numbers

The equivalent of sprintf("%.2f", num) in JavaScript seems to be num.toFixed(2), which formats num to 2 decimal places, with rounding (but see @ars265's comment about Math.round below).

(12.345).toFixed(2); // returns "12.35" (rounding!)
(12.3).toFixed(2); // returns "12.30" (zero padding)

Exponential form

The equivalent of sprintf("%.2e", num) is num.toExponential(2).

(33333).toExponential(2); // "3.33e+4"

Hexadecimal and other bases

To print numbers in base B, try num.toString(B). JavaScript supports automatic conversion to and from bases 2 through 36 (in addition, some browsers have limited support for base64 encoding).

(3735928559).toString(16); // to base 16: "deadbeef"
parseInt("deadbeef", 16); // from base 16: 3735928559

Reference Pages

Quick tutorial on JS number formatting

Mozilla reference page for toFixed() (with links to toPrecision(), toExponential(), toLocaleString(), ...)

  • 21
    Wouldn't it just be better to enclose the number literal in parenthesis, instead of leaving a weird white space there? – rmobis Nov 26 '12 at 1:53
  • 7
    That would probably look better, true. But my goal there is just to point out the syntax error trap. – rescdsk Dec 1 '12 at 21:28
  • 4
    Just a side note if you're using an older browser, or supporting older browsers, some browsers implemented toFixed incorrectly, using Math.round in place of toFixed is a better solution. – ars265 Feb 19 '13 at 14:57
  • 7
    @Raphael_ and @rescdsk: .. also works: 33333..toExponential(2); – Peter Jaric May 7 '13 at 8:12
  • Or (33333).toExponential(2) – Jonathan Aug 19 '16 at 14:32

From ES6 on you could use template strings:

let soMany = 10;
console.log(`This is ${soMany} times easier!`);
// "This is 10 times easier!

Be aware that template strings are surrounded by backticks ` instead of (single) quotes.

For further information:

https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2015/01/ES6-Template-Strings

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/template_strings

Note: Check the mozilla-site to find a list of supported browsers.

  • 26
    The problem with template strings is that they seem to be executed immediately, making their use as, say, an i18n-like string table completely worthless. I can't define the string early on, and supply the parameters to use later and/or repeatedly. – Tustin2121 Dec 4 '15 at 23:39
  • 2
    @Tustin2121 You're right that they're not built to be assigned to a variable, which is a bit mind-warping, but it's easy enough to work with templated strings' instant-execution tendancies if you hide them in a function. See jsfiddle.net/zvcm70pa – inanutshellus May 25 '16 at 3:51
  • 9
    @Tustin2121 there is no difference between using a template string or old style string concatenation, its sugar for the same thing. You would have to wrap an old style string generator in a simple function and the same thing works fine with string templates. const compile = (x, y) => `I can call this template string whenever I want.. x=${x}, y=${y}` ... compile(30, 20) – cchamberlain May 27 '16 at 6:22
  • 1
    this solution won't work for format string passed in variable (from server for example) – user993954 Nov 15 '16 at 14:06
  • 1
    @inanutshellus That works fine if your template function is defined on the same machine where it is executed. As far as I know, you can't pass a function as JSON, so storing template functions in a database doesn't work well. – styfle May 4 '17 at 18:44

jsxt, Zippo

This option fits better.

String.prototype.format = function() {
    var formatted = this;
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        var regexp = new RegExp('\\{'+i+'\\}', 'gi');
        formatted = formatted.replace(regexp, arguments[i]);
    }
    return formatted;
};

With this option I can replace strings like these:

'The {0} is dead. Don\'t code {0}. Code {1} that is open source!'.format('ASP', 'PHP');

With your code the second {0} wouldn't be replaced. ;)

  • 5
    I like this, since it globally replaces the format tokens. – Jarrod Dixon Feb 5 '11 at 4:17
  • 2
    gist.github.com/1049426 I updated your example with this approach. Numerous benefits including saving the native implementation if it exists, stringifying, etc. I tried removing regular expressions, but welp kind of needed for global replace. :-/ – tbranyen Jun 27 '11 at 18:46
  • 4
    jsxt is GPL-licensed unfortunately – AndiDog Jul 22 '12 at 20:24
  • 2
    you don't declara a variable inside a for loop – brielov Dec 11 '13 at 19:27

I use this simple function:

String.prototype.format = function() {
    var formatted = this;
    for( var arg in arguments ) {
        formatted = formatted.replace("{" + arg + "}", arguments[arg]);
    }
    return formatted;
};

That's very similar to string.format:

"{0} is dead, but {1} is alive!".format("ASP", "ASP.NET")
  • 1
    why +=?, should it formatted = this.replace("{" + arg + "}", arguments[arg]); – guilin 桂林 Nov 30 '10 at 6:30
  • 2
    I think the code is still not correct. The correct one one should be like Filipiz posted. – wenqiang Jan 11 '11 at 2:48
  • 3
    For reference, for...in won't work in every browser as this code expects it to. It'll loop over all enumerable properties, which in some browsers will include arguments.length, and in others won't even include the arguments themselves at all. In any case, if Object.prototype is added to, any additions will probably be included in the bunch. The code should be using a standard for loop, rather than for...in. – cHao Feb 6 '11 at 21:10
  • 2
    This fails if a previous replacement contains a format string as well: "{0} is dead, but {1} is alive!".format("{1}", "ASP.NET") === "ASP.NET is dead, but ASP.NET is alive!" – Gumbo Mar 28 '11 at 14:05
  • 6
    The variable arg is global. You need to do this instead: for (var arg in arguments) { – Pauan Dec 5 '12 at 22:49

For Node.js users there is util.format which has printf-like functionality:

util.format("%s world", "Hello")
  • 1
    This doesn't support %x as of Node v0.10.26 – Max Krohn Apr 24 '14 at 13:16

Here's a minimal implementation of sprintf in JavaScript: it only does "%s" and "%d", but I have left space for it to be extended. It is useless to the OP, but other people who stumble across this thread coming from Google might benefit from it.

function sprintf() {
    var args = arguments,
    string = args[0],
    i = 1;
    return string.replace(/%((%)|s|d)/g, function (m) {
        // m is the matched format, e.g. %s, %d
        var val = null;
        if (m[2]) {
            val = m[2];
        } else {
            val = args[i];
            // A switch statement so that the formatter can be extended. Default is %s
            switch (m) {
                case '%d':
                    val = parseFloat(val);
                    if (isNaN(val)) {
                        val = 0;
                    }
                    break;
            }
            i++;
        }
        return val;
    });
}

Example:

alert(sprintf('Latitude: %s, Longitude: %s, Count: %d', 41.847, -87.661, 'two'));
// Expected output: Latitude: 41.847, Longitude: -87.661, Count: 0

In contrast with similar solutions in previous replies, this one does all substitutions in one go, so it will not replace parts of previously replaced values.

I'm surprised no one used reduce, this is a native concise and powerful JavaScript function.

ES6 (EcmaScript2015)

String.prototype.format = function() {
  return [...arguments].reduce((p,c) => p.replace(/%s/,c), this);
};

console.log('Is that a %s or a %s?... No, it\'s %s!'.format('plane', 'bird', 'SOman'));

< ES6

function interpolate(theString, argumentArray) {
    var regex = /%s/;
    var _r=function(p,c){return p.replace(regex,c);}
    return argumentArray.reduce(_r, theString);
}

interpolate("%s, %s and %s", ["Me", "myself", "I"]); // "Me, myself and I"

How it works:

reduce applies a function against an accumulator and each element in the array (from left to right) to reduce it to a single value.

var _r= function(p,c){return p.replace(/%s/,c)};

console.log(
  ["a", "b", "c"].reduce(_r, "[%s], [%s] and [%s]") + '\n',
  [1, 2, 3].reduce(_r, "%s+%s=%s") + '\n',
  ["cool", 1337, "stuff"].reduce(_r, "%s %s %s")
);

  • 4
    Here's a version that uses this approach to create a simplified printf function: jsfiddle.net/11szrbx9 – Dem Pilafian Jul 20 '15 at 22:49
  • 1
    And here is another one using ES6, in one line: (...a) => {return a.reduce((p: string, c: any) => p.replace(/%s/, c)); – Bhyd Feb 22 at 11:59
  • No need for String.prototype.format in ES6: ((a,b,c)=>`${a}, ${b} and ${c}`)(...['me', 'myself', 'I']) (note that this is a bit redundant to better fit in your example) – Tino Apr 5 at 21:50
  • You'd have to implement replacement functions for each of printf's type specifiers and include logic for padding prefixes. Iterating over the format string in a sensible fashion seems to be the minor challenge here, imho. Neat solution if you only need string replacements, though. – collapsar Jul 6 at 10:19

JavaScript programmers can use String.prototype.sprintf at https://github.com/ildar-shaimordanov/jsxt/blob/master/js/String.js. Below is example:

var d = new Date();
var dateStr = '%02d:%02d:%02d'.sprintf(
    d.getHours(), 
    d.getMinutes(), 
    d.getSeconds());
  • code.google.com is a dead link – Jason Morgan Nov 16 '16 at 9:38
  • @JasonMorgan, I have shared the working link on GitHub.See the corrected answer. – jsxt Nov 20 '16 at 10:52

+1 Zippo with the exception that the function body needs to be as below or otherwise it appends the current string on every iteration:

String.prototype.format = function() {
    var formatted = this;
    for (var arg in arguments) {
        formatted = formatted.replace("{" + arg + "}", arguments[arg]);
    }
    return formatted;
};
  • 1
    It didn't work on Firefox. The debugger show arg as undefined. – xiao 啸 Dec 11 '10 at 10:27
  • Yeah I didn't post the code correctly, thanks for fixing :) – Moshe Revah Dec 11 '10 at 13:08
  • It does not replace the second character 'The {0} is dead. Don\'t code {0}. Code {1} that is open source!'.format('ASP', 'PHP'); the result becomes The ASP is dead. Don't code {0}. Code PHP that is open source!. One more thing for(arg in arguments) does not work in IE. i replaced with for (arg = 0; arg <arguments.length; arg++) – samarjit samanta Jan 28 '11 at 1:52
  • 2
    For reference, for...in won't work in every browser as this code expects it to. It'll loop over all enumerable properties, which in some browsers will include arguments.length, and in others won't even include the arguments themselves at all. In any case, if Object.prototype is added to, any additions will probably be included in the bunch. The code should be using a standard for loop, rather than for...in. – cHao Feb 6 '11 at 21:12

Adding to zippoxer's answer, I use this function:

String.prototype.format = function () {
    var a = this, b;
    for (b in arguments) {
        a = a.replace(/%[a-z]/, arguments[b]);
    }
    return a; // Make chainable
};

var s = 'Hello %s The magic number is %d.';
s.format('world!', 12); // Hello World! The magic number is 12.

I also have a non-prototype version which I use more often for its Java-like syntax:

function format() {
    var a, b, c;
    a = arguments[0];
    b = [];
    for(c = 1; c < arguments.length; c++){
        b.push(arguments[c]);
    }
    for (c in b) {
        a = a.replace(/%[a-z]/, b[c]);
    }
    return a;
}
format('%d ducks, 55 %s', 12, 'cats'); // 12 ducks, 55 cats

ES 2015 update

All the cool new stuff in ES 2015 makes this a lot easier:

function format(fmt, ...args){
    return fmt
        .split("%%")
        .reduce((aggregate, chunk, i) =>
            aggregate + chunk + (args[i] || ""), "");
}

format("Hello %%! I ate %% apples today.", "World", 44);
// "Hello World, I ate 44 apples today."

I figured that since this, like the older ones, doesn't actually parse the letters, it might as well just use a single token %%. This has the benefit of being obvious and not making it difficult to use a single %. However, if you need %% for some reason, you would need to replace it with itself:

format("I love percentage signs! %%", "%%");
// "I love percentage signs! %%"
  • 1
    this answer was great for a quick copy paste into an existing function. No require no downloads etc. – Nick Jun 24 '17 at 20:41
  • @Nick yep, that's the idea :) – Braden Best Jun 25 '17 at 3:08

Very elegant:

String.prototype.format = function (){
    var args = arguments;
    return this.replace(/\{\{|\}\}|\{(\d+)\}/g, function (curlyBrack, index) {
        return ((curlyBrack == "{{") ? "{" : ((curlyBrack == "}}") ? "}" : args[index]));
    });
};

// Usage:
"{0}{1}".format("{1}", "{0}")

Credit goes to (broken link) https://gist.github.com/0i0/1519811

  • This is the only one that handles escape brackets {{0}} as well as things like {0}{1}.format("{1}", "{0}"). Should be at the very top! – Juan Jul 9 '14 at 6:54

I'll add my own discoveries which I've found since I asked:

Sadly it seems sprintf doesn't handle thousand separator formatting like .NET's string format.

I use a small library called String.format for JavaScript which supports most of the format string capabilities (including format of numbers and dates), and uses the .NET syntax. The script itself is smaller than 4 kB, so it doesn't create much of overhead.

  • I took a look at that library and it looks really great. I was pissed off when I saw that the download was an EXE. What the heck is that about? Didn't download. – jessegavin Apr 6 '10 at 18:04
  • 1
    Not an exe any more, looks pretty excellent. – Toby Jun 17 '10 at 19:01
  • Often a downloadable archive that's an EXE is nothing more than a "self-extracting ZIP". Execute it, and it will unpack itself. This is quite convenient BUT because it looks so much like malware, the format is not used on the web all that often any more. – Chuck Kollars Jul 1 '13 at 7:46
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – starmole Jun 24 '14 at 4:56
  • @starmole the link is to a (minified) 4 kB javascript library. I don't believe pasting it into the answer is a good idea. – ivarni Jun 24 '14 at 5:07

If you are looking to handle the thousands separator, you should really use toLocaleString() from the JavaScript Number class since it will format the string for the user's region.

The JavaScript Date class can format localized dates and times.

  • 1
    It's actually a set by the user as a setting in the application (not the machine their on) but I'll take a look, thanks – Chris S Mar 4 '09 at 13:19
  • add some examples so that everyone can understands it quickly. – Bhushan Kawadkar Jun 24 '14 at 4:57

I want to share my solution for the 'problem'. I haven't re-invented the wheel but tries to find a solution based on what JavaScript already does. The advantage is, that you get all implicit conversions for free. Setting the prototype property $ of String gives a very nice and compact syntax (see examples below). It is maybe not the most efficient way, but in most cases dealing with output it does not have to be super optimized.

String.form = function(str, arr) {
    var i = -1;
    function callback(exp, p0, p1, p2, p3, p4) {
        if (exp=='%%') return '%';
        if (arr[++i]===undefined) return undefined;
        exp  = p2 ? parseInt(p2.substr(1)) : undefined;
        var base = p3 ? parseInt(p3.substr(1)) : undefined;
        var val;
        switch (p4) {
            case 's': val = arr[i]; break;
            case 'c': val = arr[i][0]; break;
            case 'f': val = parseFloat(arr[i]).toFixed(exp); break;
            case 'p': val = parseFloat(arr[i]).toPrecision(exp); break;
            case 'e': val = parseFloat(arr[i]).toExponential(exp); break;
            case 'x': val = parseInt(arr[i]).toString(base?base:16); break;
            case 'd': val = parseFloat(parseInt(arr[i], base?base:10).toPrecision(exp)).toFixed(0); break;
        }
        val = typeof(val)=='object' ? JSON.stringify(val) : val.toString(base);
        var sz = parseInt(p1); /* padding size */
        var ch = p1 && p1[0]=='0' ? '0' : ' '; /* isnull? */
        while (val.length<sz) val = p0 !== undefined ? val+ch : ch+val; /* isminus? */
       return val;
    }
    var regex = /%(-)?(0?[0-9]+)?([.][0-9]+)?([#][0-9]+)?([scfpexd%])/g;
    return str.replace(regex, callback);
}

String.prototype.$ = function() {
    return String.form(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments));
}

Here are a few examples:

String.format("%s %s", [ "This is a string", 11 ])
console.log("%s %s".$("This is a string", 11))
var arr = [ "12.3", 13.6 ]; console.log("Array: %s".$(arr));
var obj = { test:"test", id:12 }; console.log("Object: %s".$(obj));
console.log("%c", "Test");
console.log("%5d".$(12)); // '   12'
console.log("%05d".$(12)); // '00012'
console.log("%-5d".$(12)); // '12   '
console.log("%5.2d".$(123)); // '  120'
console.log("%5.2f".$(1.1)); // ' 1.10'
console.log("%10.2e".$(1.1)); // '   1.10e+0'
console.log("%5.3p".$(1.12345)); // ' 1.12'
console.log("%5x".$(45054)); // ' affe'
console.log("%20#2x".$("45054")); // '    1010111111111110'
console.log("%6#2d".$("111")); // '     7'
console.log("%6#16d".$("affe")); // ' 45054'

The PHPJS project has written JavaScript implementations for many of PHP's functions. Since PHP's sprintf() function is basically the same as C's printf(), their JavaScript implementation of it should satisfy your needs.

I use this one:

String.prototype.format = function() {
    var newStr = this, i = 0;
    while (/%s/.test(newStr))
        newStr = newStr.replace("%s", arguments[i++])

    return newStr;
}

Then I call it:

"<h1>%s</h1><p>%s</p>".format("Header", "Just a test!");
  • This does not work with 'my string %s hello %s'.format('%s')... – rawiro Oct 1 '14 at 8:28

One very slightly different version, the one I prefer (this one uses {xxx} tokens rather than {0} numbered arguments, this is much more self-documenting and suits localization much better):

String.prototype.format = function(tokens) {
  var formatted = this;
  for (var token in tokens)
    if (tokens.hasOwnProperty(token))
      formatted = formatted.replace(RegExp("{" + token + "}", "g"), tokens[token]);
  return formatted;
};

A variation would be:

  var formatted = l(this);

that calls an l() localization function first.

I have a solution very close to Peter's, but it deals with number and object case.

if (!String.prototype.format) {
  String.prototype.format = function() {
    var args;
    args = arguments;
    if (args.length === 1 && args[0] !== null && typeof args[0] === 'object') {
      args = args[0];
    }
    return this.replace(/{([^}]*)}/g, function(match, key) {
      return (typeof args[key] !== "undefined" ? args[key] : match);
    });
  };
}

Maybe it could be even better to deal with the all deeps cases, but for my needs this is just fine.

"This is an example from {name}".format({name:"Blaine"});
"This is an example from {0}".format("Blaine");

PS: This function is very cool if you are using translations in templates frameworks like AngularJS:

<h1> {{('hello-message'|translate).format(user)}} <h1>
<h1> {{('hello-by-name'|translate).format( user ? user.name : 'You' )}} <h1>

Where the en.json is something like

{
    "hello-message": "Hello {name}, welcome.",
    "hello-by-name": "Hello {0}, welcome."
}
  • the [^}] part in the regexp is unnecesary.. use {(.*?)} instead, or better {([\s\S]*?)} to match newline too. – rawiro Oct 1 '14 at 8:26

For those who like Node.JS and its util.format feature, I've just extracted it out into its vanilla JavaScript form (with only functions that util.format uses):

exports = {};

function isString(arg) {
    return typeof arg === 'string';
}
function isNull(arg) {
    return arg === null;
}
function isObject(arg) {
    return typeof arg === 'object' && arg !== null;
}
function isBoolean(arg) {
    return typeof arg === 'boolean';
}
function isUndefined(arg) {
    return arg === void 0;
}
function stylizeNoColor(str, styleType) {
    return str;
}
function stylizeWithColor(str, styleType) {
    var style = inspect.styles[styleType];

    if (style) {
        return '\u001b[' + inspect.colors[style][0] + 'm' + str +
            '\u001b[' + inspect.colors[style][3] + 'm';
    } else {
        return str;
    }
}
function isFunction(arg) {
    return typeof arg === 'function';
}
function isNumber(arg) {
    return typeof arg === 'number';
}
function isSymbol(arg) {
    return typeof arg === 'symbol';
}
function formatPrimitive(ctx, value) {
    if (isUndefined(value))
        return ctx.stylize('undefined', 'undefined');
    if (isString(value)) {
        var simple = '\'' + JSON.stringify(value).replace(/^"|"$/g, '')
                .replace(/'/g, "\\'")
                .replace(/\\"/g, '"') + '\'';
        return ctx.stylize(simple, 'string');
    }
    if (isNumber(value)) {
        // Format -0 as '-0'. Strict equality won't distinguish 0 from -0,
        // so instead we use the fact that 1 / -0 < 0 whereas 1 / 0 > 0 .
        if (value === 0 && 1 / value < 0)
            return ctx.stylize('-0', 'number');
        return ctx.stylize('' + value, 'number');
    }
    if (isBoolean(value))
        return ctx.stylize('' + value, 'boolean');
    // For some reason typeof null is "object", so special case here.
    if (isNull(value))
        return ctx.stylize('null', 'null');
    // es6 symbol primitive
    if (isSymbol(value))
        return ctx.stylize(value.toString(), 'symbol');
}
function arrayToHash(array) {
    var hash = {};

    array.forEach(function (val, idx) {
        hash[val] = true;
    });

    return hash;
}
function objectToString(o) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(o);
}
function isDate(d) {
    return isObject(d) && objectToString(d) === '[object Date]';
}
function isError(e) {
    return isObject(e) &&
        (objectToString(e) === '[object Error]' || e instanceof Error);
}
function isRegExp(re) {
    return isObject(re) && objectToString(re) === '[object RegExp]';
}
function formatError(value) {
    return '[' + Error.prototype.toString.call(value) + ']';
}
function formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, value) {
    var stylize = ctx.stylize;
    ctx.stylize = stylizeNoColor;
    var str = formatPrimitive(ctx, value);
    ctx.stylize = stylize;
    return str;
}
function isArray(ar) {
    return Array.isArray(ar);
}
function hasOwnProperty(obj, prop) {
    return Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, prop);
}
function formatProperty(ctx, value, recurseTimes, visibleKeys, key, array) {
    var name, str, desc;
    desc = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(value, key) || {value: value[key]};
    if (desc.get) {
        if (desc.set) {
            str = ctx.stylize('[Getter/Setter]', 'special');
        } else {
            str = ctx.stylize('[Getter]', 'special');
        }
    } else {
        if (desc.set) {
            str = ctx.stylize('[Setter]', 'special');
        }
    }
    if (!hasOwnProperty(visibleKeys, key)) {
        name = '[' + key + ']';
    }
    if (!str) {
        if (ctx.seen.indexOf(desc.value) < 0) {
            if (isNull(recurseTimes)) {
                str = formatValue(ctx, desc.value, null);
            } else {
                str = formatValue(ctx, desc.value, recurseTimes - 1);
            }
            if (str.indexOf('\n') > -1) {
                if (array) {
                    str = str.split('\n').map(function (line) {
                        return '  ' + line;
                    }).join('\n').substr(2);
                } else {
                    str = '\n' + str.split('\n').map(function (line) {
                        return '   ' + line;
                    }).join('\n');
                }
            }
        } else {
            str = ctx.stylize('[Circular]', 'special');
        }
    }
    if (isUndefined(name)) {
        if (array && key.match(/^\d+$/)) {
            return str;
        }
        name = JSON.stringify('' + key);
        if (name.match(/^"([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_0-9]*)"$/)) {
            name = name.substr(1, name.length - 2);
            name = ctx.stylize(name, 'name');
        } else {
            name = name.replace(/'/g, "\\'")
                .replace(/\\"/g, '"')
                .replace(/(^"|"$)/g, "'")
                .replace(/\\\\/g, '\\');
            name = ctx.stylize(name, 'string');
        }
    }

    return name + ': ' + str;
}
function formatArray(ctx, value, recurseTimes, visibleKeys, keys) {
    var output = [];
    for (var i = 0, l = value.length; i < l; ++i) {
        if (hasOwnProperty(value, String(i))) {
            output.push(formatProperty(ctx, value, recurseTimes, visibleKeys,
                String(i), true));
        } else {
            output.push('');
        }
    }
    keys.forEach(function (key) {
        if (!key.match(/^\d+$/)) {
            output.push(formatProperty(ctx, value, recurseTimes, visibleKeys,
                key, true));
        }
    });
    return output;
}
function reduceToSingleString(output, base, braces) {
    var length = output.reduce(function (prev, cur) {
        return prev + cur.replace(/\u001b\[\d\d?m/g, '').length + 1;
    }, 0);

    if (length > 60) {
        return braces[0] +
            (base === '' ? '' : base + '\n ') +
            ' ' +
            output.join(',\n  ') +
            ' ' +
            braces[1];
    }

    return braces[0] + base + ' ' + output.join(', ') + ' ' + braces[1];
}
function formatValue(ctx, value, recurseTimes) {
    // Provide a hook for user-specified inspect functions.
    // Check that value is an object with an inspect function on it
    if (ctx.customInspect &&
        value &&
        isFunction(value.inspect) &&
            // Filter out the util module, it's inspect function is special
        value.inspect !== exports.inspect &&
            // Also filter out any prototype objects using the circular check.
        !(value.constructor && value.constructor.prototype === value)) {
        var ret = value.inspect(recurseTimes, ctx);
        if (!isString(ret)) {
            ret = formatValue(ctx, ret, recurseTimes);
        }
        return ret;
    }

    // Primitive types cannot have properties
    var primitive = formatPrimitive(ctx, value);
    if (primitive) {
        return primitive;
    }

    // Look up the keys of the object.
    var keys = Object.keys(value);
    var visibleKeys = arrayToHash(keys);

    if (ctx.showHidden) {
        keys = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(value);
    }

    // This could be a boxed primitive (new String(), etc.), check valueOf()
    // NOTE: Avoid calling `valueOf` on `Date` instance because it will return
    // a number which, when object has some additional user-stored `keys`,
    // will be printed out.
    var formatted;
    var raw = value;
    try {
        // the .valueOf() call can fail for a multitude of reasons
        if (!isDate(value))
            raw = value.valueOf();
    } catch (e) {
        // ignore...
    }

    if (isString(raw)) {
        // for boxed Strings, we have to remove the 0-n indexed entries,
        // since they just noisey up the output and are redundant
        keys = keys.filter(function (key) {
            return !(key >= 0 && key < raw.length);
        });
    }

    // Some type of object without properties can be shortcutted.
    if (keys.length === 0) {
        if (isFunction(value)) {
            var name = value.name ? ': ' + value.name : '';
            return ctx.stylize('[Function' + name + ']', 'special');
        }
        if (isRegExp(value)) {
            return ctx.stylize(RegExp.prototype.toString.call(value), 'regexp');
        }
        if (isDate(value)) {
            return ctx.stylize(Date.prototype.toString.call(value), 'date');
        }
        if (isError(value)) {
            return formatError(value);
        }
        // now check the `raw` value to handle boxed primitives
        if (isString(raw)) {
            formatted = formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, raw);
            return ctx.stylize('[String: ' + formatted + ']', 'string');
        }
        if (isNumber(raw)) {
            formatted = formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, raw);
            return ctx.stylize('[Number: ' + formatted + ']', 'number');
        }
        if (isBoolean(raw)) {
            formatted = formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, raw);
            return ctx.stylize('[Boolean: ' + formatted + ']', 'boolean');
        }
    }

    var base = '', array = false, braces = ['{', '}'];

    // Make Array say that they are Array
    if (isArray(value)) {
        array = true;
        braces = ['[', ']'];
    }

    // Make functions say that they are functions
    if (isFunction(value)) {
        var n = value.name ? ': ' + value.name : '';
        base = ' [Function' + n + ']';
    }

    // Make RegExps say that they are RegExps
    if (isRegExp(value)) {
        base = ' ' + RegExp.prototype.toString.call(value);
    }

    // Make dates with properties first say the date
    if (isDate(value)) {
        base = ' ' + Date.prototype.toUTCString.call(value);
    }

    // Make error with message first say the error
    if (isError(value)) {
        base = ' ' + formatError(value);
    }

    // Make boxed primitive Strings look like such
    if (isString(raw)) {
        formatted = formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, raw);
        base = ' ' + '[String: ' + formatted + ']';
    }

    // Make boxed primitive Numbers look like such
    if (isNumber(raw)) {
        formatted = formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, raw);
        base = ' ' + '[Number: ' + formatted + ']';
    }

    // Make boxed primitive Booleans look like such
    if (isBoolean(raw)) {
        formatted = formatPrimitiveNoColor(ctx, raw);
        base = ' ' + '[Boolean: ' + formatted + ']';
    }

    if (keys.length === 0 && (!array || value.length === 0)) {
        return braces[0] + base + braces[1];
    }

    if (recurseTimes < 0) {
        if (isRegExp(value)) {
            return ctx.stylize(RegExp.prototype.toString.call(value), 'regexp');
        } else {
            return ctx.stylize('[Object]', 'special');
        }
    }

    ctx.seen.push(value);

    var output;
    if (array) {
        output = formatArray(ctx, value, recurseTimes, visibleKeys, keys);
    } else {
        output = keys.map(function (key) {
            return formatProperty(ctx, value, recurseTimes, visibleKeys, key, array);
        });
    }

    ctx.seen.pop();

    return reduceToSingleString(output, base, braces);
}
function inspect(obj, opts) {
    // default options
    var ctx = {
        seen: [],
        stylize: stylizeNoColor
    };
    // legacy...
    if (arguments.length >= 3) ctx.depth = arguments[2];
    if (arguments.length >= 4) ctx.colors = arguments[3];
    if (isBoolean(opts)) {
        // legacy...
        ctx.showHidden = opts;
    } else if (opts) {
        // got an "options" object
        exports._extend(ctx, opts);
    }
    // set default options
    if (isUndefined(ctx.showHidden)) ctx.showHidden = false;
    if (isUndefined(ctx.depth)) ctx.depth = 2;
    if (isUndefined(ctx.colors)) ctx.colors = false;
    if (isUndefined(ctx.customInspect)) ctx.customInspect = true;
    if (ctx.colors) ctx.stylize = stylizeWithColor;
    return formatValue(ctx, obj, ctx.depth);
}
exports.inspect = inspect;


// http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code#graphics
inspect.colors = {
    'bold': [1, 22],
    'italic': [3, 23],
    'underline': [4, 24],
    'inverse': [7, 27],
    'white': [37, 39],
    'grey': [90, 39],
    'black': [30, 39],
    'blue': [34, 39],
    'cyan': [36, 39],
    'green': [32, 39],
    'magenta': [35, 39],
    'red': [31, 39],
    'yellow': [33, 39]
};

// Don't use 'blue' not visible on cmd.exe
inspect.styles = {
    'special': 'cyan',
    'number': 'yellow',
    'boolean': 'yellow',
    'undefined': 'grey',
    'null': 'bold',
    'string': 'green',
    'symbol': 'green',
    'date': 'magenta',
    // "name": intentionally not styling
    'regexp': 'red'
};


var formatRegExp = /%[sdj%]/g;
exports.format = function (f) {
    if (!isString(f)) {
        var objects = [];
        for (var j = 0; j < arguments.length; j++) {
            objects.push(inspect(arguments[j]));
        }
        return objects.join(' ');
    }

    var i = 1;
    var args = arguments;
    var len = args.length;
    var str = String(f).replace(formatRegExp, function (x) {
        if (x === '%%') return '%';
        if (i >= len) return x;
        switch (x) {
            case '%s':
                return String(args[i++]);
            case '%d':
                return Number(args[i++]);
            case '%j':
                try {
                    return JSON.stringify(args[i++]);
                } catch (_) {
                    return '[Circular]';
                }
            default:
                return x;
        }
    });
    for (var x = args[i]; i < len; x = args[++i]) {
        if (isNull(x) || !isObject(x)) {
            str += ' ' + x;
        } else {
            str += ' ' + inspect(x);
        }
    }
    return str;
};

Harvested from: https://github.com/joyent/node/blob/master/lib/util.js

I have a slightly longer formatter for JavaScript here...

You can do formatting several ways:

  • String.format(input, args0, arg1, ...)
  • String.format(input, obj)
  • "literal".format(arg0, arg1, ...)
  • "literal".format(obj)

Also, if you have say a ObjectBase.prototype.format (such as with DateJS) it will use that.

Examples...

var input = "numbered args ({0}-{1}-{2}-{3})";
console.log(String.format(input, "first", 2, new Date()));
//Outputs "numbered args (first-2-Thu May 31 2012...Time)-{3})"

console.log(input.format("first", 2, new Date()));
//Outputs "numbered args(first-2-Thu May 31 2012...Time)-{3})"

console.log(input.format(
    "object properties ({first}-{second}-{third:yyyy-MM-dd}-{fourth})"
    ,{
        'first':'first'
        ,'second':2
        ,'third':new Date() //assumes Date.prototype.format method
    }
));
//Outputs "object properties (first-2-2012-05-31-{3})"

I've also aliased with .asFormat and have some detection in place in case there's already a string.format (such as with MS Ajax Toolkit (I hate that library).

Just in case someone needs a function to prevent polluting global scope, here is the function that does the same:

  function _format (str, arr) {
    return str.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function (match, number) {
      return typeof arr[number] != 'undefined' ? arr[number] : match;
    });
  };

For basic formatting:

var template = jQuery.validator.format("{0} is not a valid value");
var result = template("abc");

I did not see the String.format variant:

String.format = function (string) {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1, arguments.length);
    return string.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function (match, number) {
        return typeof args[number] != "undefined" ? args[number] : match;
    });
};

I didn't see pyformat in the list so I thought I'd throw it in:

console.log(pyformat( 'The {} {} jumped over the {}'
                , ['brown' ,'fox' ,'foobar']
                ))
console.log(pyformat('The {0} {1} jumped over the {1}'
                , ['brown' ,'fox' ,'foobar']
                ))
console.log(pyformat('The {color} {animal} jumped over the {thing}'
                , [] ,{color: 'brown' ,animal: 'fox' ,thing: 'foobaz'}
                ))
/**
 * Format string by replacing placeholders with value from element with
 * corresponsing index in `replacementArray`.
 * Replaces are made simultaneously, so that replacement values like
 * '{1}' will not mess up the function.
 *
 * Example 1:
 * ('{2} {1} {0}', ['three', 'two' ,'one']) -> 'one two three'
 *
 * Example 2:
 * ('{0}{1}', ['{1}', '{0}']) -> '{1}{0}'
 */
function stringFormat(formatString, replacementArray) {
    return formatString.replace(
        /\{(\d+)\}/g, // Matches placeholders, e.g. '{1}'
        function formatStringReplacer(match, placeholderIndex) {
            // Convert String to Number
            placeholderIndex = Number(placeholderIndex);

            // Make sure that index is within replacement array bounds
            if (placeholderIndex < 0 ||
                placeholderIndex > replacementArray.length - 1
            ) {
                return placeholderIndex;
            }

            // Replace placeholder with value from replacement array
            return replacementArray[placeholderIndex];
        }
    );
}

protected by user177800 Feb 5 '14 at 23:03

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