9

I am attempting to make a function that helps handling N std::variant types.

Note: I am trying to make all pathways compile time validated. So std::optional and std::holds_alternative are not viable for me.

The implementation is as follows:

template<typename T>
using Possible = std::variant<std::monostate, T>;

template<typename... Types>
void ifAll(std::function<void(Types...)> all, Possible<Types>&&... possibles)
{
    std::visit(
        [&](auto&&... args) {
            if constexpr ((... &&
                           std::is_same_v<std::decay_t<decltype(args)>, Types>))
            {
                return all(std::forward<Types>(args)...);
            }
            else
            {
                std::cout << "At least one type is monostate" << std::endl;
            }
        },
        possibles...);
}

And an example of using the function is:

int main()
{
    Possible<int>  a = 16;
    Possible<bool> b = true;

    ifAll([](const int& x, const bool& y)
              -> void { std::cout << "All types set!" << std::endl; },
          a,
          b);
}

However I get a compiler error:

TestFile.cc: error: no matching function for call to 'ifAll'
    ifAll([](const int& x, const bool& y)
    ^~~~~

TestFile.cc: note: candidate template ignored: could not match
    'function<void (type-parameter-0-0...)>' against '(lambda at
    TestFile.cc)'

void ifAll(std::function<void(Types...)> all, Possible<Types>&&... possibles)
    ^

Why does the lambda I provide not match the function signature?

Attempted Fix 1

I tried moving in a and b which still does not work:

ifAll([](const int& x, const bool& y)
              -> void { std::cout << "All types set!" << std::endl; },
          std::move(a),
          std::move(b));
15
  • std::optional?
    – L. F.
    Apr 6, 2020 at 5:42
  • Any particular reason not to use std::optional? That seems to work similarly to std::variant<std::monostate, T>. Apr 6, 2020 at 5:42
  • std::optional is not type safe and is additionally not noexcept. I want to eliminate the possibility of runtime errors. Apr 6, 2020 at 5:43
  • @HurricaneDevelopment std::variant is no more "type safe" than std::optional.
    – L. F.
    Apr 6, 2020 at 5:43
  • You're expanding Types within the template parameter list of Possible. Possible takes one template argument. That's the problem. Apr 6, 2020 at 5:44

5 Answers 5

4

Following call would work:

int main() {
    Possible<int>  a = 16;
    Possible<bool> b = true;

    std::function<void(int, bool)> fun = [](int x, bool y) -> void {
        std::cout << "All types set!" << std::endl;
    };

    ifAll(fun,
          std::move(a),
          std::move(b));
}

or switch your function signature to:

template <typename... Types>
void ifAll(std::function<void(Types...)> const& all, Possible<Types>&... possibles)

and then you can call it without std::move:

int main() {
    Possible<int>  a = 16;
    Possible<bool> b = true;

    std::function<void(int, bool)> fun = [](int x, bool y) -> void {
        std::cout << "All types set!" << std::endl;
    };

    ifAll(fun, a, b);
}
7
  • Woah this totally works! I'm not sure I understand why though? Apr 6, 2020 at 6:01
  • 1
    Hurricane Development It's because they removed the const&. std::function objects cannot convert to other types of std::function objects. See my answer. Apr 6, 2020 at 6:02
  • There are couple of reasons. First, you are passing a function with arguments of types int const& and bool const& but your ifAll function expects int and bool types. Furthermore, your second argument to function ifAll is rvalue reference so you need to std::move your parameter. Or just accept const reference which would be better IMHO.
    – NutCracker
    Apr 6, 2020 at 6:07
  • Its a templated R-value so shouldn't it be a universal reference? Looks like I forgot the forward on the std::visit. Apr 6, 2020 at 6:08
  • I'm sorry, I'm not sure what you mean? It's a templated x-value (&&), a type of r-value, but not just any r-value. lvalues can convert to basic rvalues, but only prvalues (like literals, a.m, a+b, etc.) can be implicitly converted to xvalues. a and b are variables, so they are lvalues (they can be assigned to). Thus you need std::move or a cast to make them xvalues. Apr 6, 2020 at 6:10
1

An easy solution is to use a function object + std::optional:

#include <functional>
#include <optional>

struct Error {};

template <typename F, typename... Args>
decltype(auto) if_all(F&& f, Args&&... args)
{
    if ((args && ...)) {
        return std::invoke(std::forward<F>(f), *std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    } else {
        throw Error{};
    }
}

Usage example:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::optional<int> a{5};
    std::optional<int> b{10};
    std::cout << if_all(std::plus{}, a, b) << '\n';
}

(live demo)

If you insist to use std::variant instead of std::optional (which is probably because of some misunderstandings about either of them), the idea is the same — you need to check if all arguments are "empty" first (maybe using std::holds_alternative), and unwrap the arguments after.

15
  • That is not acceptable. With variant, the conditions can be compile time validated. holds_alternative is not a compile time check, so I will not use that. Apr 6, 2020 at 5:58
  • @HurricaneDevelopment "With variant, the conditions can be compile time validated" No, they can't. Variant is strictly run-time. It is not possible to ensure variants hold a specific alternative at compile time, because this information is runtime-only. visit does not do what you think. In particular, it uses function pointers to simulate the runtime switch.
    – L. F.
    Apr 6, 2020 at 5:59
  • Yes, but you can provide what to do given all possible states of the variant (this can be compile time validated). So as long as the standard implementation you are using does not have bugs, this is essentially compile time validation. Maybe I am using compile time validated wrong, but it is sure a hell of a lot better than optionals. Apr 6, 2020 at 6:03
  • @HurricaneDevelopment "you can provide what to do given all possible states of the variant" You can do that with optional too - has_value and !has_value, by testing a bool flag. Why do you think using function pointer indirection to do the same thing is better?
    – L. F.
    Apr 6, 2020 at 6:05
  • std::visit compile time checks that you have provided pathways for all outcomes. has_value() does not, so if you mess up Boolean logic, the compiler will not save you. In the case of std::visit, it will. Apr 6, 2020 at 6:07
1

My apologies. I believe the problem is rather twofold:

  1. You do not use std::move on passing lvalues (the variables a, b) to a function taking xvalue arguments (the Possible<Types>&&... expansion.)
  2. You try to convert std::function<void(const int&, const int&)> to std::function<void(int, int)> when passing the lambda to your function.

The compiler matches Types to (int, int) given the other arguments. It then tries to look for a std::function<void(int, int)> as the first argument. Instead, it gets a function lambda of the type void(*)(const int&, const int&). Thus there is a signature mismatch.

My suggestion would be to take a hint from the standard library, and instead of trying to use std::function objects of specific type, instead add a template parameter FuncType for the function type, and pass in the function pointer using that. I think this might be why standard algorithms take function type as a template parameter, even when they can deduce the approximate function signature that should be passed from the other template arguments.

2
  • "It then tries to look for a std::function<void(int, int)> as the first argument. Instead, it gets a function lambda of the type void(*)(const int&, const int&). Thus there is a signature mismatch." I thought std::function validates the argument based on std::is_invocable? int, bool should work for const int&, const bool& IIRc.
    – L. F.
    Apr 6, 2020 at 6:16
  • Cool tip on just templating the function type. Apr 6, 2020 at 6:16
1

Possible<Types>&& is actually rvalue reference, and not forwarding reference. You have so to add overloads to handle the different cases.

template<F, typename... Types> void ifAll(F, const Possible<Types>&...);
template<F, typename... Types> void ifAll(F, Possible<Types>&...);
template<F, typename... Types> void ifAll(F, Possible<Types>&&...);

In template<typename... Types> void ifAll(std::function<void(Types...)>, Possible<Types>&...), Types has to be deduced twice, and so error happens when deduction mismatches.

In your case, you have first const int&, const bool& (Since CTAD with C++17) and then int, bool. Mismatch, so the error.

Several ways to fix the issues:

  • Fix call site (fragile solution):

    std::function<int, bool> f = [](const int& x, const bool& y)
                  -> void { std::cout << "All types set!" << std::endl; };
    ifAll(fun, a, b); // Assuming overload with lvalue references
    
  • Make one parameter non deducible:

    template<typename... Types>
    void ifAll(std::function<void(std::identity_type_t<Types>...)>, Possible<Types>&...)
    
  • Add extra template parameters:

    template<typename... Args, typename... Types>
    void ifAll(std::function<void(Args...)>, Possible<Types>&...)
    

    Possibly with some SFINAE.

  • Change completely argument (I would go for than one):

    template<F, typename... Types>
    void ifAll(F, Possible<Types>&...)
    // or even
    template<F, typename... Ts>
    void ifAll(F, Ts&&...); // Forwarding reference, no extra overloads to add.
    

    Possibly with some SFINAE.

6
  • You are a proponent of the final one? I think this seems like a good idea... Apr 6, 2020 at 17:19
  • Yes, but for implementation, I would do something like L. F. solution. From all the combinations, only one is interesting.
    – Jarod42
    Apr 6, 2020 at 17:33
  • I think in this scenario that does kind of make sense., but what are the drawbacks from using visit? Apr 6, 2020 at 17:39
  • With single parameter, it is mostly similar to a virtual call. With several parameters, A big numbers of overloads has to be built, that number increase rapidly (2**n in your case, as Possibly<T> has 2 cases). I am fan of std::visit/std::variant which allows simple multi dispatch, and get rid of lot of enum and switch.
    – Jarod42
    Apr 6, 2020 at 17:54
  • 1
    std::visit has no complexity requirement for 2 or more variants :-/ But as usual with performance, we have to measure. I bet for a longer compilation, and similar or worse runtime than the optional way (for the all else nothing). but just a (reasonable) bet.
    – Jarod42
    Apr 6, 2020 at 18:14
0

As in the accepted answer, one problem is that you shouldn't have the && in Possible<Types>&&. This means you can only accept rvalue arguments, but in your usage example, a and b are lvalues. The easiest way to deal is to use forwarding references to handle all cases. The other problem is that you allow Types... to be deduced from the std::function argument. It's possible for the lambda's arguments to not exactly match the Possibles, and so you should prevent Types... from being deduced from the std::function and only take them from the Possibles. The easiest way to do this is to stick some kind of type computation in the template argument in the argument type, which makes the compiler give up trying to do deduction on that argument. Sometimes, you just use a dummy type_identity_t function, but, here, we can do something more interesting and get both birds with one stone

template<typename T>
struct get_handler_argument;
template<typename T>
struct get_handler_argument<Possible<T>> { using type = T&; };
template<typename T>
struct get_handler_argument<Possible<T> const> { using type = T const&; };
template<typename T>
using get_handler_argument_t = typename get_handler_argument<std::remove_reference_t<T>>::type;

template<typename... Vars>
void ifAll(std::function<void(get_handler_argument_t<Vars>...)> all, Vars&&... possibles) {
    std::visit(
        [&](auto&&... args) {
            if constexpr ((... &&
                           std::is_same_v<std::decay_t<decltype(args)>, std::decay_t<get_handler_argument_t<Vars>>>)) {
                return all(std::forward<get_handler_argument_t<Vars>>(args)...);
            } else {
                std::cout << "At least one type is monostate" << std::endl;
            }
        },
        possibles...);
}

What you lose here is that you can no longer directly provide a "present" value in place of a Possible value without explicitly wrapping it in the Possible constructor. This is no loss; just capture it instead of passing it. What you gain is that you can use a function call or what-have-you to initialize the Possibles, instead of having to save them in variables manually first. Your example works as-is with this definition, unlike the currently accepted answer.

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