4

what happens when we modify the swap function this way ? I know it doesn't work but what exactly is going on ? I'm not understanding what I actually did ?

#include <stdio.h>

void swap(int*, int*);

int main(){
   int x=5,y=10;
   swap(&x, &y);
   printf("x:%d,y:%d\n",x,y);
   return 0;
 }

void swap(int *x, int *y){ 
   int* temp;
   temp=x;
   x=y;
   y=temp;
}
5
  • 7
    Here, you are swapping the pointers themselves locally, not what they point to, so there is no externally observable effect. Apr 6, 2020 at 10:16
  • 2
    You need to pass the pointers by reference if you want that to work (int*&); its useful for things that are expensive to copy.
    – nick
    Apr 6, 2020 at 10:18
  • 1
    @nick Yes, that would be useful in that particular case, but here it is not possible because x and y are of type int, not int*. One can´t swap values of pointers if they are not pointer objects. Apr 6, 2020 at 11:14
  • 1
    @RobertSsupportsMonicaCellio of course, it was just a side-note on the general technique, i.e. it can work just not with this particular setup. I would argue that this never makes sense for integers anyway, since the cost of copying an int is identical to copying a pointer.
    – nick
    Apr 6, 2020 at 12:36
  • Amazingly similar question from a few days ago: stackoverflow.com/questions/61013632/… Apr 6, 2020 at 13:28

3 Answers 3

8

In the function

void swap(int* x, int* y){ 
    int* temp;
    temp=x;
    x=y;
    y=temp;
}

you just swap the pointer values for the two function arguments.

If you want to swap their values you need to implement it like

void swap(int* x, int* y){ 
    int temp = *x;  // retrive the value that x poitns to
    *x = *y;        // write the value y points to, to the memory location x points to
    *y = temp;      // write the value of tmp, to the memory location x points to
}

that way the swap function swaps the value for the referenced memory locations.

6
  • It's not clear if this is what the OP wants, or if they want to swap the values that they point to.
    – TonyK
    Apr 6, 2020 at 10:28
  • @TonyK I'm not sure what your concern with my answer is. I explained the behavoir of OPs swap function, and proposed a function that would do what OP seams to want to do (fair enough, that is just an assumtion. But most likly correct by how OP uses the swap function)
    – Ackdari
    Apr 6, 2020 at 10:39
  • @TonyK "or if they want to swap the values that they point to." - But that´s exactly what the provided function does. Apr 6, 2020 at 10:42
  • 1
    Oh sorry! A braino on my part. I meant "or if they want to swap the pointers themselves" (as in nick's comment to the OP).
    – TonyK
    Apr 6, 2020 at 10:57
  • @TonyK "or if they want to swap the pointers themselves" but that does not make sense in the context of the main function OP
    – Ackdari
    Apr 6, 2020 at 11:46
5
void swap(int *x, int *y){ 
   int* temp;
   temp = x;
   x = y;
   y = temp;
}

swap() takes two pointers to int here but internally only swaps the values of the local pointers x and y - the addresses of the objects they do point to. - Means that at the end of swap() before it returns, x points to the object y have pointed to and y points to the object x have pointed to.

There is no effect in the caller at the objects x and y point to.


If you want to swap the values of the objects which xand y point to, you need to define swap() like that:

void swap(int *x, int *y){ 
   int temp;
   temp = *x;     // temp gets the int value of the int object x is pointing to.
   *x = *y;       // x gets the int value of the int object y is pointing to.
   *y = temp;     // y gets the int value of temp (formerly x).
}

Example program (Online Example):

#include <stdio.h> 

void swap(int *x, int *y){ 
   int temp;
   temp = *x;     // temp gets the int value of the int object x is pointing to.
   *x = *y;       // x gets the int value y of the int object y is pointing to.
   *y = temp;     // y gets the int value of temp (formerly x).
}

int main (void)
{
    int a = 1, b = 2;
    printf("Before the swap() function:\n");
    printf("a = %d b = %d\n\n",a,b);

    swap(&a,&b);

    printf("After the swap() function:\n");
    printf("a = %d b = %d",a,b);

    return 0;
}

Output:

Before the swap() function:
a = 1 b = 2

After the swap() function:
a = 2 b = 1
2
4

Within the function its two parameters that hold copies of values of the passed arguments are swapped.

As the function deals with copies of arguments the original arguments (passed pointers to x and y) that are temporary objects will not be swapped.

To swap values of pointers to x and y you have to define in main such pointers initializing them by the addresses of x and y and pass them to the function by reference through pointers to the pointers.

Here is a demonstrative program.

#include <stdio.h>

void swap( int **ppx, int **ppy )
{
    int *tmp = *ppx;
    *ppx = *ppy;
    *ppy = tmp;
}

int main(void) 
{
    int x=5, y=10;

    int *px = &x;
    int *py = &y;

    printf( "*px = %d, *py = %d\n", *px, *py );

    swap( &px, &py );

    printf( "*px = %d, *py = %d\n", *px, *py );

    return 0;
}

Its output is

*px = 5, *py = 10
*px = 10, *py = 5

See also my answer to this question Pointer Confusion: swap method in c

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