17

To make the results reproducible I've red more than 20 articles and added to my script maximum of the functions ... but failed.

In the official source I red there are 2 kinds of seeds - global and operational. May be, the key to solving my problem is setting the operational seed, but I don't understand where to apply it.

Would you, please, help me to achieve reproducible results with tensorflow (version > 2.0)? Thank you very much.

from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from keras.optimizers import adam
from sklearn.preprocessing import MinMaxScaler


np.random.seed(7)
import tensorflow as tf
tf.random.set_seed(7) #analogue of set_random_seed(seed_value)
import random
random.seed(7)
tf.random.uniform([1], seed=1)
tf.Graph.as_default #analogue of  tf.get_default_graph().finalize()

rng = tf.random.experimental.Generator.from_seed(1234)
rng.uniform((), 5, 10, tf.int64)  # draw a random scalar (0-D tensor) between 5 and 10

df = pd.read_csv("s54.csv", 
                 delimiter = ';', 
                 decimal=',', 
                 dtype = object).apply(pd.to_numeric).fillna(0)

#data normalization
scaler = MinMaxScaler() 
scaled_values = scaler.fit_transform(df) 
df.loc[:,:] = scaled_values


X_train, X_test, y_train, y_test = train_test_split(df.iloc[:,1:],
                                                    df.iloc[:,:1],
                                                    test_size=0.2,
                                                    random_state=7,
                                                    stratify = df.iloc[:,:1])

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(1200, input_dim=len(X_train.columns), activation='relu'))  
model.add(Dense(150, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(80, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(10, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(1, activation='sigmoid')) 

loss="binary_crossentropy"
optimizer=adam(lr=0.01)
metrics=['accuracy']
epochs = 2
batch_size = 32
verbose = 0

model.compile(loss=loss,  
              optimizer=optimizer, 
              metrics=metrics) 
model.fit(X_train, y_train, epochs = epochs, batch_size=batch_size, verbose = verbose)
predictions = model.predict(X_test)
tn, fp, fn, tp = confusion_matrix(y_test, predictions>.5).ravel()
3
  • 1
    I'm not sure, but I think if you try to run the script again "without resetting your python kernel", the seed will continue to be iterated and produce different results. I believe reproduction can only be made if you reset your python kernel every time you run de code. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:33
  • 1
    If the method accepts a seed (instead of the general seed you're setting at the top), then this method "alone" may be reproducted many times in the same running python kernel. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:34
  • Daniel, thank you very much for your answer. Unfortunatelly, restarting kernel didn't help. I think my method doesn't accept the seed I setup at the top of the script. I'm sure that I give the same input into the model and the seed doesn't work on the level: model.fit Commented Apr 8, 2020 at 5:11

5 Answers 5

15

As of TensorFlow 2.8, there is tf.config.experimental.enable_op_determinism().

You can ensure reproducibility, even on GPU, through

import tensorflow as tf

tf.keras.utils.set_random_seed(42)  # sets seeds for base-python, numpy and tf
tf.config.experimental.enable_op_determinism()

Note though, this comes at a significant performance penalty.

2
  • 1
    This is the best answer to this issue. +1 from my side!
    – Yahya
    Commented Jan 31, 2023 at 1:36
  • Believe it or not, my model training even became faster... I think this has to do with the multi-threading inner approach by TF which probably is causing a lot of unneeded overhead!
    – Yahya
    Commented Jan 31, 2023 at 1:40
13

As a reference from the documentation
Operations that rely on a random seed actually derive it from two seeds: the global and operation-level seeds. This sets the global seed.

Its interactions with operation-level seeds are as follows:

  1. If neither the global seed nor the operation seed is set: A randomly picked seed is used for this op.
  2. If the operation seed is not set but the global seed is set: The system picks an operation seed from a stream of seeds determined by the global seed.
  3. If the operation seed is set, but the global seed is not set: A default global seed and the specified operation seed are used to determine the random sequence.
  4. If both the global and the operation seed are set: Both seeds are used in conjunction to determine the random sequence.

1st Scenario

A random seed will be picked by default. This can be easily noticed with the results. It will have different values every time you re-run the program or call the code multiple times.

x_train = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32)
print(x_train)

2nd Scenario

The global is set but the operation has not been set. Although it generated a different seed from first and second random. If you re-run or restart the code. The seed for both will still be the same. It both generated the same result over and over again.

tf.random.set_seed(2)
first = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32)
print(first)
sec = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32)
print(sec)

3rd Scenario

For this scenario, where the operation seed is set but not the global. If you re-run the code it will give you different results but if you restart the runtime if will give you the same sequence of results from the previous run.

x_train = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32, seed=2)
print(x_train)

4th scenario

Both seeds will be used to determine the random sequence. Changing the global and operation seed will give different results but restarting the runtime with the same seed will still give the same results.

tf.random.set_seed(3)
x_train = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32, seed=1)
print(x_train) 

Created a reproducible code as a reference.
By setting the global seed, It always gives the same results.

import tensorflow as tf
from tensorflow.keras.models import Sequential
from tensorflow.keras.layers import Dense
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.preprocessing import MinMaxScaler

## GLOBAL SEED ##                                                   
tf.random.set_seed(3)
x_train = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32)
y_train = tf.math.sin(x_train)
x_test = tf.random.normal((10,1), 2, 3, dtype=tf.float32)
y_test = tf.math.sin(x_test)

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(1200, input_shape=(1,), activation='relu'))  
model.add(Dense(150, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(80, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(10, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(1, activation='sigmoid')) 

loss="binary_crossentropy"
optimizer=tf.keras.optimizers.Adam(lr=0.01)
metrics=['mse']
epochs = 5
batch_size = 32
verbose = 1

model.compile(loss=loss,  
              optimizer=optimizer, 
              metrics=metrics) 
histpry = model.fit(x_train, y_train, epochs = epochs, batch_size=batch_size, verbose = verbose)
predictions = model.predict(x_test)
print(predictions)

enter image description here
Note: If you are using TensorFlow 2 higher, the Keras is already in the API, therefore, you should use TF.Keras rather than the native one.
All of these are simulated on the google colab.

3
  • TF_Support, thank you for detailed and structured answer. If to divide the 'reproducible code as a reference' you gave in the Jupiter notebook on 2 cells: 1) all the rows but 3 last 2) 3 last (to begin from 'histpry = model.fit(x_train ...) and run 2 cells consequently, it always shows the identical result. But if to run the 1st cell once and then the 2nd cell several times, it always gives different results. And, what is interesting, if to rerun the 1st cell, the results of the 2nd cell after run several times - are always repeatable. Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 6:46
  • Interesting: when in the 2nd cell I run this several times: tf.random.set_seed(3) x_train = tf.random.normal((10,1), 1, 1, dtype=tf.float32) print(x_train). It is repeatable. But when I run this: tf.random.set_seed(3) histpry = model.fit(x_train, y_train, epochs = epochs, batch_size=batch_size, verbose = verbose) predictions = model.predict(x_test) print(predictions) - it is not repeatable. Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 7:08
  • Is it possible to see identical results every time I run only the 2nd cell? I found the only way - to rebuild the model every time from: model = Sequential(). Before, it is nessessary to run tf.random.set_seed(3). Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 7:18
2

you can set seed for all randoms by followings

import numpy as np
np.random.seed(0)
import random
random.seed(0)
import tensorflow
tensorflow.random.set_seed(0)
import tensorflow as tf
tf.random.set_seed(0)
tf.keras.utils.set_random_seed(0)   
tf.config.experimental.enable_op_determinism()
1
  • 3
    As described in the TF docs: "Calling tf.keras.utils.set_random_seed sets the Python seed, the NumPy seed, and the TensorFlow seed." So it is not necessary to set them separately.
    – loki
    Commented Sep 22, 2022 at 6:54
0

When we use layers >= 3 and neurons >= 100, number of the processor' cores is meaningful. My problem was to run the script on the 2 different servers:

-with 32 cores

-with 16 cores

When I ran the script on the servers with 32 cores (and even with 32 and 24 cores), results were identical.

0

To make the findings reproducible, I just needed to add 1 extra line before doing anything using tensorflow or keras.

random_state = 1234
import tensorflow as tf
tf.keras.utils.set_random_seed(random_state)   

I tested (including "Disconnecting and Deleting the Runtime" once and "Restarting" the session once) in Google Colab 4 times. I found the same performance in prediction every time.

Why does that work?

Please check this (https://www.tensorflow.org/api_docs/python/tf/keras/utils/set_random_seed) for details.

It sets all random seeds (Python, NumPy, and backend framework, e.g. TF). Calling this utility is equivalent to the following:

import random
random.seed(seed)

import numpy as np
np.random.seed(seed)

import tensorflow as tf  # Only if TF is installed
tf.random.set_seed(seed)

import torch  # Only if the backend is 'torch'
torch.manual_seed(seed)

You may also read this (https://www.tensorflow.org/api_docs/python/tf/random/set_seed) which helped me to get more information regarding randomization in tensorflow.

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