10

I'm making a React App and I'm getting this warning. I'm trying to make two API calls when the component mounts:

useEffect(() => {
  getWebsites();
  loadUserRatings();
}, []);

That's why I have an empty array, because I want to call it just once when the component gets mounted. But I'm still getting the warning, how can I fix it?

Those two functions are passed to the component using connect from react redux, the whole component looks like this:

const Wrapper = (props) => {
  const { getWebsites, loadUserRatings } = props;

  useEffect(() => {
    getWebsites();
    loadUserRatings();
  }, []);

  return (
    <>
      <Header />
      <Websites />
      <Sync />
    </>
  );
};
1

3 Answers 3

14

TL;DR

You should add getWebsites, loadUserRatings to the dependencies array.

useEffect(() => {
  getWebsites();
  loadUserRatings();
}, [getWebsites, loadUserRatings]);

React asks you to add variables (whose values may change) to the dependency array so that the callback can use updated values of those variables.


You might face an issue where the useEffect's callback runs more times than intended. Consider the below example:

const Bla = (props) => {
 const foo = () => {
  console.log('foo')
 }

 useEffect(() => {
  foo();
 }, [foo])
 
 return <span>bla</span>
}

As foo is used inside useEffect's callback, it is added to the dependencies. But every time the component Bla renders, a new function is created and foo changes. This will trigger the useEffect's callback.

This can be fixed using the hook useCallback:

const foo = useCallback(() => {
  console.log('foo');
}, []);

Now, when Bla rerenders, a new function will still be created but useCallback will make sure that foo doesn't change (memoization) which helps in preventing useEffect's callback from running again.

Note: If there are variables that are used inside foo that change over time, they should be added to the useCallback's dependencies array so that the function uses updated values.

6
  • @nick keep in mind that if getWebsites() and loadUserSettings() are passed down as function expressions rather than static definitions, then this will cause the useEffect() to trigger every time Wrapper renders. See my answer for how to deal with that scenario. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:54
  • @PatrickRoberts I updated my answer, we can also memoize them as I did, is that correct? Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:56
  • @Ramesh useCallback() takes two arguments, not one. You can't use useCallback() to get around this, it has to be initialized as state. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:57
  • @PatrickRoberts can we pass an array like [props.getWebsites] as the second argument instead? Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:58
  • @Ramesh no because that's no different than using getWebsites() directly. I think your initial answer was fine, my answer already addresses what to do when encountering un-memoized functions. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:58
2

You have to add getWebsites and loadUserRatings to the dependencies of useEffect:

useEffect(() => {
  getWebsites();
  loadUserRatings();
}, [getWebsites, loadUserRatings]

All variables defined outside the useEffect hook need to be added, with the stipulation that they're defined in the body of the component or custom hook the useEffect() is called from, or passed down from parameters. Variables defined outside of the component or custom hook don't need to be added to the dependencies list. (memoization) It's one of the lesser known rules of hooks.


Note: (this doesn't work for your scenario as your functions are passed down through the props) You can also wrap your function in a useCallback hook or define the variables you need inside the useEffect hook itself if you don't want to add it to the dependencies of your useEffect hook.

1
  • 1
    All variables defined outside the useEffect hook need to be added, with the stipulation that they're defined in the body of the component or custom hook the useEffect() is called from, or passed down from parameters. Variables defined outside of the component or custom hook don't need to be added to the dependencies list. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 16:51
2

In my experience, it's not typical to pass un-memoized functions down via props like this.

// don't do this

<Wrapper
  getWebsites={() => fetchJson('websites').then(setWebsites)}
  loadUserRatings={() => fetchJson('ratings').then(setUserRatings)}
/>

If they are correctly memoized (using a hook like useCallback(), or by being defined outside of any component), then it's safe to pass them to the deps of your useEffect() without any difference in behavior. Here's an example that fixes the scenario above.*

// do this

const fetchJson = (...args) => fetch(...args).then(res => res.json());

const Parent = () => {
  const [websites, setWebsites] = useState([]);
  const [userRatings, setUserRatings] = useState({});

  // useCallback creates a memoized reference
  const getWebsites = useCallback(
    () => fetchJson('websites').then(setWebsites),
    [setWebsites]
  );
  const loadUserRatings = useCallback(
    () => fetchJson('ratings').then(setUserRatings),
    [setUserRatings]
  );

  ...

  <Wrapper
    getWebsites={getWebsites}
    loadUserRatings={loadUserRatings}
  />

* useState() memoizes the dispatch function in its return value, so technically it would be safe to pass [] as the deps to each useCallback() here, but I believe that specifying the dispatch functions as dependencies helps improve clarity by explicitly communicating the author's intent, and there's no disadvantage to passing them.

Ramesh's answer is sufficient for this situation.


If you find that you're stuck with the first scenario, then, as a last resort, you can initialize props into your component's state like this.

const Wrapper = (props) => {
  const [{ getWebsites, loadUserRatings }] = useState(props);

  useEffect(() => {
    getWebsites();
    loadUserRatings();
  }, [getWebsites, loadUserRatings]);

  return (
    <>
      <Header />
      <Websites />
      <Sync />
    </>
  );
};
6
  • @Luze I disagree personally with the claim that this is a "great pattern". I prefer to treat initializing props into state as a last resort approach if memoizing by other means is too inconvenient, which it usually isn't. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 17:01
  • 1
    @PatrickRoberts I think using useCallback hook with necessary dependencies in the parent component and then passing these functions is a good approach. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 17:04
  • @Ramesh I elaborated on your comment in my answer. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 17:24
  • @PatrickRoberts Nice, one thing I want to say is you can skip setUserRating, setWebsites from adding to the dependencies because react makes sure that they are properly memorized. React also doesn't show any warning when we don't add them. This is because the function comes from useState hook but not user-defined. Nevertheless, it is okay to add them too. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 17:31
  • 1
    @PatrickRoberts Yeah, I totally agree. I've seen some react projects doing that. Commented Apr 7, 2020 at 17:40

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