51

I'm looking for a nice JS snippet to convert a timestamp (e.g. from Twitter API) to a nice user friendly relative time (e.g. 2 seconds ago, one week ago etc).

Anyone care to share some of their favourite methods (preferably not using plugins)?

10 Answers 10

92

Well it's pretty easy if you aren't overly concerned with accuracy. What wrong with the trivial method?

function timeDifference(current, previous) {

    var msPerMinute = 60 * 1000;
    var msPerHour = msPerMinute * 60;
    var msPerDay = msPerHour * 24;
    var msPerMonth = msPerDay * 30;
    var msPerYear = msPerDay * 365;

    var elapsed = current - previous;

    if (elapsed < msPerMinute) {
         return Math.round(elapsed/1000) + ' seconds ago';   
    }

    else if (elapsed < msPerHour) {
         return Math.round(elapsed/msPerMinute) + ' minutes ago';   
    }

    else if (elapsed < msPerDay ) {
         return Math.round(elapsed/msPerHour ) + ' hours ago';   
    }

    else if (elapsed < msPerMonth) {
        return 'approximately ' + Math.round(elapsed/msPerDay) + ' days ago';   
    }

    else if (elapsed < msPerYear) {
        return 'approximately ' + Math.round(elapsed/msPerMonth) + ' months ago';   
    }

    else {
        return 'approximately ' + Math.round(elapsed/msPerYear ) + ' years ago';   
    }
}

Working example here.

You might want to tweak it to handle the singular values better (e.g. 1 day instead of 1 days) if that bothers you.

  • Brill! Just what I was looking for! I knew the basic principle but wanted to make sure it what definitely the best way to do it :) – wilsonpage May 24 '11 at 10:46
19

Here is exact mimic of twitter time ago without plugins:

  function timeSince(timeStamp) {
    var now = new Date(),
      secondsPast = (now.getTime() - timeStamp.getTime()) / 1000;
    if(secondsPast < 60){
      return parseInt(secondsPast) + 's';
    }
    if(secondsPast < 3600){
      return parseInt(secondsPast/60) + 'm';
    }
    if(secondsPast <= 86400){
      return parseInt(secondsPast/3600) + 'h';
    }
    if(secondsPast > 86400){
        day = timeStamp.getDate();
        month = timeStamp.toDateString().match(/ [a-zA-Z]*/)[0].replace(" ","");
        year = timeStamp.getFullYear() == now.getFullYear() ? "" :  " "+timeStamp.getFullYear();
        return day + " " + month + year;
    }
  }

Gist https://gist.github.com/timuric/11386129

Fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/qE8Lu/1/

Hope it helps.

  • You, sir, know things! Thanks so much. Why use a 3rd party library right? – zanona Oct 12 '17 at 15:39
5

Tada! Timeago: http://timeago.yarp.com/

Oh hang on - without plugins? Why's that then? I guess you could open up the plugin file and hack the guts out of it.

  • Well, that actually is a plugin. The OP asks for a solution without using one. – pimvdb May 24 '11 at 10:11
  • Just want to keep code as clean as possible and fully customisable. I don't think it's a big funtion. Poss 10-15 lines therefore don't need the other bundled functionality of a plugin. – wilsonpage May 24 '11 at 10:13
  • 1
    Okay, the source code is quite short and looks like it could be extracted for your needs as long as you keep the MIT license header. timeago.yarp.com/jquery.timeago.js – James McCormack May 24 '11 at 10:16
4

Inspirated on Diego Castillo awnser's and in the timeago.js plugin, I wrote my own vanilla plugin for this.

var timeElement = document.querySelector('time'),
    time = new Date(timeElement.getAttribute('datetime'));

timeElement.innerText = TimeAgo.inWords(time.getTime());

var TimeAgo = (function() {
  var self = {};
  
  // Public Methods
  self.locales = {
    prefix: '',
    sufix:  'ago',
    
    seconds: 'less than a minute',
    minute:  'about a minute',
    minutes: '%d minutes',
    hour:    'about an hour',
    hours:   'about %d hours',
    day:     'a day',
    days:    '%d days',
    month:   'about a month',
    months:  '%d months',
    year:    'about a year',
    years:   '%d years'
  };
  
  self.inWords = function(timeAgo) {
    var seconds = Math.floor((new Date() - parseInt(timeAgo)) / 1000),
        separator = this.locales.separator || ' ',
        words = this.locales.prefix + separator,
        interval = 0,
        intervals = {
          year:   seconds / 31536000,
          month:  seconds / 2592000,
          day:    seconds / 86400,
          hour:   seconds / 3600,
          minute: seconds / 60
        };
    
    var distance = this.locales.seconds;
    
    for (var key in intervals) {
      interval = Math.floor(intervals[key]);
      
      if (interval > 1) {
        distance = this.locales[key + 's'];
        break;
      } else if (interval === 1) {
        distance = this.locales[key];
        break;
      }
    }
    
    distance = distance.replace(/%d/i, interval);
    words += distance + separator + this.locales.sufix;

    return words.trim();
  };
  
  return self;
}());


// USAGE
var timeElement = document.querySelector('time'),
    time = new Date(timeElement.getAttribute('datetime'));

timeElement.innerText = TimeAgo.inWords(time.getTime());
<time datetime="2016-06-13"></time>

4

Intl.RelativeTimeFormat - Native API

Currently (Dec' 18) a Stage 3 proposal, and already implemented in Chrome 71

const rtf = new Intl.RelativeTimeFormat('en', { numeric: 'auto' });

const millisecondsPerDay = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;

[
  [3.14 , 'second' ],
  [-15  , 'minute' ],
  [8    , 'hour'   ],
  [-1   , 'day'    ],
  [3    , 'week'   ],
  [-5   , 'month'  ],
  [2    , 'quarter'],
  [-42  , 'year'   ],
  [(new Date('9/22/2018') - new Date())/millisecondsPerDay,'day']
].forEach(d => console.log(   rtf.format(d[0], d[1])  ));

Intl.RelativeTimeFormat is available by default in V8 v7.1.179 and Chrome 71. As this API becomes more widely available, you’ll find libraries such as Moment.js, Globalize, and date-fns dropping their dependency on hardcoded CLDR databases in favor of the native relative time formatting functionality, thereby improving load-time performance, parse- and compile-time performance, run-time performance, and memory usage.

  • awesome, but how to do it from a date? – Dayd May 15 at 10:30
  • 2
    @Dayd - updated answer with an example for days, but if you want to compare dates in a robust way then you must first create a comparison method between two dates and understand if the margin is in hours, days, years, etc.. Then it's as simple as passing that result to the Intl.RelativeTimeFormat method. What you are asking is a whole different topic – vsync May 15 at 12:46
  • Thanks for your answer :) – Dayd May 15 at 19:13
1

For anyone interested, I ended up creating a Handlebars helper to do this. Usage:

    {{#beautify_date}}
        {{timestamp_ms}}
    {{/beautify_date}}

Helper:

    Handlebars.registerHelper('beautify_date', function(options) {
        var timeAgo = new Date(parseInt(options.fn(this)));

        if (Object.prototype.toString.call(timeAgo) === "[object Date]") {
            if (isNaN(timeAgo.getTime())) {
                return 'Not Valid';
            } else {
                var seconds = Math.floor((new Date() - timeAgo) / 1000),
                intervals = [
                    Math.floor(seconds / 31536000),
                    Math.floor(seconds / 2592000),
                    Math.floor(seconds / 86400),
                    Math.floor(seconds / 3600),
                    Math.floor(seconds / 60)
                ],
                times = [
                    'year',
                    'month',
                    'day',
                    'hour',
                    'minute'
                ];

                var key;
                for(key in intervals) {
                    if (intervals[key] > 1)  
                        return intervals[key] + ' ' + times[key] + 's ago';
                    else if (intervals[key] === 1) 
                        return intervals[key] + ' ' + times[key] + ' ago';
                }

                return Math.floor(seconds) + ' seconds ago';
            }
        } else {
            return 'Not Valid';
        }
    });
1

Datetime plugins exist because it's very hard to get it right. This video explaining date-time inconsistencies will shed some light on the issue.

All above solutions without plugins are incorrect.

For working with Dates and times using a plugin is preferable. Out of the hundreds of plugins that deal with it, we use Moment.js and it's doing the job.

From the twitter API dcumentation we can see their timestamp format:

"created_at":"Wed Aug 27 13:08:45 +0000 2008"

We can parse with it with Moment.js

const postDatetime = moment(
  "Wed Aug 27 13:08:45 +0000 2008",
  "dddd, MMMM Do, h:mm:ss a, YYYY"
);
const now = moment();
const timeAgo = now.diff(postDatetime, 'seconds');

To specify the preferred time unit for the diff, we can use the isSame method. eg:

if (now.isSame(postDatetime, 'day')) {
  const timeUnit = 'days';
}

Overall, constructing something like:

`Posted ${timeAgo} ${timeUnit} ago`;

Refer to your plugin's documentation for handling relative time (ie: "How long ago?") calculations.

  • You don't need a plugin library to deal with relative differences between Javascript Date objects. They already handle conversion to UTC and when converted to integers give absolute milliseconds since the UTC epoch. So, date1 - date2 will give you a proper time delta in milliseconds regardless of the original timezones. Likewise, new Date().getTime() in two browsers in different time zones will report the same number if executed simultaneously on correct system clocks. – Yetanotherjosh Jul 22 '18 at 5:18
1

There is also sugar.js and relative function for this purpose.

relative - Outputs a string in units relative to the current date ("ago" or "from now").

1

If you need multilingual and don't want to add a big library like moment. intl-relativeformat from yahoo it a nice solution.

var rf = new IntlRelativeFormat('en-US');

var posts = [
    {
        id   : 1,
        title: 'Some Blog Post',
        date : new Date(1426271670524)
    },
    {
        id   : 2,
        title: 'Another Blog Post',
        date : new Date(1426278870524)
    }
];

posts.forEach(function (post) {
    console.log(rf.format(post.date));
});
// => "3 hours ago"
// => "1 hour ago"
0

You can use machinepack-datetime for this purpose. It is easy and clear with its defined API.

tutorialSchema.virtual('createdOn').get(function () {
    const DateTime = require('machinepack-datetime');
    let timeAgoString = "";
    try {
        timeAgoString = DateTime.timeFrom({
            toWhen: DateTime.parse({
                datetime: this.createdAt
            }).execSync(),
            fromWhen: new Date().getTime()
        }).execSync();
    } catch(err) {
        console.log('error getting createdon', err);
    }
    return timeAgoString; // a second ago
});

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