116

I just want to flip a boolean based on what it already is. If it's true - make it false. If it's false - make it true.

Here is my code excerpt:

switch(wParam) {

case VK_F11:
  if (flipVal == true) {
     flipVal = false;
  } else {
    flipVal = true;
  }
break;

case VK_F12:
  if (otherVal == true) {
     otherValVal = false;
  } else {
    otherVal = true;
  }
break;

default:
break;
}

12 Answers 12

328
+500

You can flip a value like so:

myVal = !myVal;

so your code would shorten down to:

switch(wParam) {
    case VK_F11:
    flipVal = !flipVal;
    break;

    case VK_F12:
    otherVal = !otherVal;
    break;

    default:
    break;
}
  • 5
    Not only this is the easiest, but also the cleanest way. – sharptooth Mar 4 '09 at 14:58
  • the two cases can be merged as they do the same thing. – David Allan Finch Mar 4 '09 at 15:16
  • 1
    Is default: break; really necessary? Won't the switch end the same without it? – Chris Lutz Mar 6 '09 at 8:41
  • 11
    Default: break; is unnecessary. – Rob K Mar 6 '09 at 15:52
  • 3
    If you're toggling something long-winded like object1->system1.system2.system3.parameter1 then it can be helpful to have a TOGGLE(a) macro. This prevents some mistakes and makes it all more readable on narrow screens. – OJW Oct 1 '10 at 12:17
74

Clearly you need a factory pattern!

KeyFactory keyFactory = new KeyFactory();
KeyObj keyObj = keyFactory.getKeyObj(wParam);
keyObj.doStuff();


class VK_F11 extends KeyObj {
   boolean val;
   public void doStuff() {
      val = !val;
   }
}

class VK_F12 extends KeyObj {
   boolean val;
   public void doStuff() {
      val = !val;
   }
}

class KeyFactory {
   public KeyObj getKeyObj(int param) {
      switch(param) {
         case VK_F11:
            return new VK_F11();
         case VK_F12:
            return new VK_F12();
      }
      throw new KeyNotFoundException("Key " + param + " was not found!");
   }
}

:D

</sarcasm>
  • 7
    We could probably add in the singleton pattern for the factory too. – Drew Mar 4 '09 at 21:56
  • @Orm Cause you are an ORM? :) – mlvljr Mar 19 '10 at 16:37
  • 3
    Note the subtle recommendation to switch to Java! – Mechanical snail Dec 19 '12 at 16:38
  • Well ... i think we need another major release of C++ for this one, may be C++/51 – 0x6900 Sep 15 '15 at 12:40
  • Hey guys! I think your approach is not reentrant. You need atomic_bool at least, better a mutex or an event queue. Further, we need an observer-pattern to monitor the state of val. – Marco Freudenberger Oct 20 '17 at 9:14
33

If you know the values are 0 or 1, you could do flipval ^= 1.

  • 1
    Why use a bitwise operator for a logical operation? Smells of needless obfuscation to me. – Mark Pim Mar 4 '09 at 17:18
  • 5
    @Mark: Sorry. Guess I'm old-fashioned. But it does help if your L-value expression is really long, so you don't have to repeat it. Also, you could say flipval ^= TRUE. Is that better? – Mike Dunlavey Mar 4 '09 at 17:52
  • 6
    @Alnitak: You're right in some circumstances. I have seen some people pack bits together to "save space" and act as if the instructions to access them didn't take any space. – Mike Dunlavey Mar 6 '09 at 12:39
  • 2
    @Albert: ^ is the exclusive-or operator. 0^1 is 1, and 1^1 is 0. It's the same as adding if you ignore the carry bit. Or you can think of it as - if either bit is 1, the result is the inverse of the other bit. Or you can think of it as asking the question: Are these two bits different? – Mike Dunlavey Nov 12 '13 at 1:33
  • 1
    @MikeDunlavey if you're on a device with 4M of Flash for code space, and 3K of SRAM for data space then that is a justified way of acting! – M.M Dec 16 '14 at 4:39
27

Easiest solution that I found:

x ^= true;
  • 7
    x = !x; is not only shorter, but also more legible. – Rodrigo Oct 4 '17 at 0:00
  • 8
    Note that e.g. longVariableName ^= true; is clearly shorter than longVariableName = !longVariableName; And every programmer should know XOR. – xamid Oct 5 '17 at 16:15
  • a ^= b means a = a ^ b, where ^ means XOR. The notation a °= b for a = a ° b for any operator ° is very common amongst C/C++/C# syntax. – xamid Oct 6 '17 at 17:49
  • Yes, I know that. It's just that I'm using R for so long that I was thinking about ^ as power function. So ^= would need to have an entirely new meaning... Lol – Rodrigo Oct 6 '17 at 18:04
  • Anecdotal, but I recently came across the line gRackWidget->modules->first().lights[PATTERN1_LIGHT + i].value = !gRackWidget->modules->first().lights[PATTERN1_LIGHT + i].value; Of course, the cleanest thing to do is to expand it to multiple lines and use temporary variables to store the objects, but gRackWidget->modules->first().lights[PATTERN1_LIGHT + i].value ^= 1 is much more readable, less error prone, and fewer characters than the original code. – Vortico Oct 31 '17 at 10:40
10

Just for information - if instead of an integer your required field is a single bit within a larger type, use the 'xor' operator instead:

int flags;

int flag_a = 0x01;
int flag_b = 0x02;
int flag_c = 0x04;

/* I want to flip 'flag_b' without touching 'flag_a' or 'flag_c' */
flags ^= flag_b;

/* I want to set 'flag_b' */
flags |= flag_b;

/* I want to clear (or 'reset') 'flag_b' */
flags &= ~flag_b;

/* I want to test 'flag_b' */
bool b_is_set = (flags & flag_b) != 0;
9

This seems to be a free-for-all ... Heh. Here's another varation, which I guess is more in the category "clever" than something I'd recommend for production code:

flipVal ^= (wParam == VK_F11);
otherVal ^= (wParam == VK_F12);

I guess it's advantages are:

  • Very terse
  • Does not require branching

And a just as obvious disadvantage is

  • Very terse

This is close to @korona's solution using ?: but taken one (small) step further.

  • 2
    By order of operations, I think you can omit the parenthesis for even more terse. :O – Drew Sep 29 '11 at 14:50
8

Just because my favorite odd ball way to toggle a bool is not listed...

bool x = true;
x = x == false;

works too. :)

(yes the x = !x; is clearer and easier to read)

6

The codegolf'ish solution would be more like:

flipVal = (wParam == VK_F11) ? !flipVal : flipVal;
otherVal = (wParam == VK_F12) ? !otherVal : otherVal;
2

I prefer John T's solution, but if you want to go all code-golfy, your statement logically reduces to this:

//if key is down, toggle the boolean, else leave it alone.
flipVal = ((wParam==VK_F11) && !flipVal) || (!(wParam==VK_F11) && flipVal);
if(wParam==VK_F11) Break;

//if key is down, toggle the boolean, else leave it alone.
otherVal = ((wParam==VK_F12) && !otherVal) || (!(wParam==VK_F12) && otherVal);
if(wParam==VK_F12) Break;
  • Don't you have to check wParam against VK_F11 and VK_F12? – drby Mar 4 '09 at 15:44
2
flipVal ^= 1;

same goes for

otherVal
0

Clearly you need a flexible solution that can support types masquerading as boolean. The following allows for that:

template<typename T>    bool Flip(const T& t);

You can then specialize this for different types that might pretend to be boolean. For example:

template<>  bool Flip<bool>(const bool& b)  { return !b; }
template<>  bool Flip<int>(const int& i)    { return !(i == 0); }

An example of using this construct:

if(Flip(false))  { printf("flipped false\n"); }
if(!Flip(true))  { printf("flipped true\n"); }

if(Flip(0))  { printf("flipped 0\n"); }
if(!Flip(1)) { printf("flipped 1\n"); }

No, I'm not serious.

0

For integers with values of 0 and 1 you can try:

value = abs(value - 1);

MWE in C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
        printf("Hello, World!\n");
        int value = 0;
        int i;
        for (i=0; i<10; i++)
        {
                value = abs(value -1);
                printf("%d\n", value);
        }
        return 0;
}

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