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I understood the goal of the cookie httpOnly, this system secure against the cookie still because we cannot use document.cookie to get the cookies information (for example XSS attack).

I made a POC with flask and PHP to practice this concept.

  1. I made a POST request and the server create the response.set_cookie with the httpOnly :
@app.route('/api/connexion', methods=['POST'])
def conn():
    login = request.form["login"]
    password = request.form["password"]
    response = make_response(jsonify({
        'login':login,
        'password': password
    }))
    response.set_cookie('token', 't1',httponly=True)
    return response
  1. With the php code i send the request and get the response but How can i save the cookies to reused it in other request with other API call ?

php code :

myForm = document.getElementById("myForm")
    myForm.addEventListener('submit', (e) => {
        console.log("in event");
        e.preventDefault();
        let form = new FormData(myForm);
        fetch("http://127.0.0.1:8000/api/connexion",{
            method:'POST',
            body:form
        }).then((response) => {
            return response.json();
        }).then((text)=> {
            console.log(text);
        })

    })

So the question is : Do I need to get the cookie and save it manually or the cookie will be send automatically in each request and I would like to understand How.

Thank you very much.

  • 1
    What you labelled as "php code" looks suspiciously like JavaScipt. – MechMK1 Apr 8 at 14:20
  • Yes you right because it's was on my php file it's Js code – gaby developement Apr 8 at 14:24
  • 1
    Then for all intents and purposes it is JavaScript. I assume it will be put inside a <script> tag and executed by a browser's JavaScript engine. – MechMK1 Apr 8 at 14:25
  • yes sure the code will be between script balise – gaby developement Apr 8 at 14:27
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The browser saves the cookies automatically, as long as the date is in the future. Once the date is passed, the browser will "throw" the cookie and will stop using it. It's a good practice to add expiration date to your cookie

After the browser saves the cookie, it will send it in most of the requests to the domain that is specified in the cookie.

In your example - the browser won't send the the new token cookie you have just defined. That's because of the fetch specification, you can look under credentials.

How to send automatically the domain cookies using fetch request

When you are creating new fetch request, make sure that you have {"credentials":"same-origin"} inside your init object.

In your code this should look like this:
myForm = document.getElementById("myForm")
myForm.addEventListener('submit', (e)=>{
    console.log("in event");
    e.preventDefault();
    let form = new FormData(myForm);
    let fetchInitObject = {
        method: 'POST',
        body: form,
        /*
        The following line will tell the browser 
        to send all the cookies of the site in the URL, as long as 
        the url and the site that runs the Javascript code are from the same origin
        In your example - the side that runs the javascript code, should be 127.0.0.1 in port 8000, without http
        */
        credentials: 'same-origin'
    };
    fetch("http://127.0.0.1:8000/api/connexion", fetchInitObject).then((response)=>{
        return response.json();
    }
    ).then((text)=>{
        console.log(text);
    }
    )

}
)
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