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I have the following regular expression:

^[-]?([+]?[\d]+[-+*/]?)+$

My objective is to match strings that contain arithmetic expressions and integers. Which it is successful in, except one case. When it comes to equals signs. I only want this expression to match strings that contain at most one equals sign. Which would mean that it would match

7=7

but not

7=7=7

since the second string has two occurrences of the equals sign.

I tried using curly braces {} and I think I need something like

={0,1}

which would match with strings that have exactly one or no occurrencces of "=". But I do unfortunately not know how to incorporate it in my regex.

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Since you only want to match arithmetic expressions and integers I changed your code to find everything if it has numbers, operators or a equal sign: ^[-+*\/\d=]+$. I needed to escape the character / -> \/

To match only one equal sign I addes a negative lookahead: (?!.*=.*=). If it finds whats insinde the brackets, the whole regex wont match. For example if you have a word mytext : (?!mytext) the whole regex won't match. .* means it finds everything (. stands for every character and the * say's it can be there 0 to unlimited times).

So this is the solution:

^(?!.*=.*=)[-+*\/\d=]+$

See live example here: https://regex101.com/r/zhSEmf/1/

Also your code didn't worked for -4*-4.

Edit: Since you don't want your code to start with / or * I added id in the negative lookahead: ^(?!.*=.*=|[\/*].*)[-+*\/\d=]+$

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  • I do not want to indicate negativity or positivity of numbers in the middle of the expression. So 7/+6 is not ok whereas +7/6is ok – Synchrowave Apr 13 '20 at 13:19
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    Ok, but you can still use (?!.*=.*=) at the beginning of your regex to get only solutions with one equal sign. – Puschi Apr 13 '20 at 13:40
  • Also I do not know how complex your operations will be or how its constructed. If you want a more precise solution you will need to add more informations in your question. – Puschi Apr 13 '20 at 13:42

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