26

I have two data frames:

df1
x1  x2
1   a
2   b
3   c
4   d

and

df2
x1  x2
2   zz
3   qq

I want to replace some of the values in df1$x2 with values in df2$x2 based on the conditional match between df1$x1 and df2$x2 to produce:

df1
x1  x2
1   a
2   zz
3   qq
4   d
26

use match(), assuming values in df1 are unique.

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4,x2=letters[1:4],stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
df2 <- data.frame(x1=2:3,x2=c("zz","qq"),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

df1$x2[match(df2$x1,df1$x1)] <- df2$x2
> df1
  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d

If the values aren't unique, use :

for(id in 1:nrow(df2)){
  df1$x2[df1$x1 %in% df2$x1[id]] <- df2$x2[id]
}
3
  • Nice. I wrote the match with reversed arguments and couldn't figure out why it was more complicated than I thought it should be. I'll add my answer as well because it may help others to think about how the changing the order of arguments in match can make things easier or harder. – Aaron left Stack Overflow May 24 '11 at 14:56
  • Thanks Joris. I was working with 'match' but couldn't get it to work. – Mike May 24 '11 at 15:13
  • I have added a solution that will perform better in the case of non-unique values in df1. – C8H10N4O2 Jul 21 '17 at 15:18
7

The first part of Joris' answer is good, but in the case of non-unique values in df1, the row-wise for-loop will not scale well on large data.frames.

You could use a data.table "update join" to modify in place, which will be quite fast:

library(data.table)
setDT(df1); setDT(df2)
df1[df2, on = .(x1), x2 := i.x2]

Or, assuming you don't care about maintaining row order, you could use SQL-inspired dplyr:

library(dplyr)
union_all(
  inner_join( df1["x1"], df2 ), # x1 from df1 with matches in df2, x2 from df2
  anti_join(  df1, df2["x1"] )  # rows of df1 with no match in df2
) # %>% arrange(x1) # optional, won't maintain an arbitrary row order

Either of these will scale much better than the row-wise for-loop.

8
  • The data.table idiom is df1[df2, on=.(x1), x2 := i.x2 ] -- modifies in place ("replace some of the values in df1$x2" as the OP asked) and doesn't require setting keys. It's similar to an update join from SQL. – Frank Jul 21 '17 at 15:23
  • @Frank yep you beat me to it. – C8H10N4O2 Jul 21 '17 at 15:25
  • 1
    Ok. df1[df2, x2 := df2[,x2]] is not the same thing, fyi. – Frank Jul 21 '17 at 15:25
  • 1
    @Frank looks like Hadley decided not to implement update join in dplyr, which seems like a weakness in the package to me. – C8H10N4O2 Jul 21 '17 at 15:40
  • 1
    Yeah, I saw that. Hadley's reason for excluding them is pretty weak (saying he's sticking to pure SQL), since update joins exist in some flavors of SQL. It just comes down to the "grammar" he came up with not being flexible enough. – Frank Jul 21 '17 at 15:42
5

We could use eat from my package safejoin, and "patch" the matches from the rhs into the lhs when columns conflict.

# devtools::install_github("moodymudskipper/safejoin")
library(safejoin)
library(dplyr)

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4,x2=letters[1:4],stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
df2 <- data.frame(x1=2:3,x2=c("zz","qq"),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

eat(df1, df2, .by = "x1", .conflict = "patch")
#   x1 x2
# 1  1  a
# 2  2 zz
# 3  3 qq
# 4  4  d
5

I see that Joris and Aaron have both chosen to build examples without factors. I can certainly understand that choice. For the reader with columns that are already factors there would also be to option of coercion to "character". There is a strategy that avoids that constraint and which also allows for the possibility that there may be indices in df2 that are not in df1 which I believe would invalidate Joris Meys' but not Aaron's solutions posted so far:

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4,x2=letters[1:4])
df2 <- data.frame(x1=c(2,3,5), x2=c("zz", "qq", "xx") )

It requires that the levels be expanded to include the intersection of both factor variables and then also the need to drop non-matching columns (= NA values) in match(df1$x1, df2$x1)

 df1$x2 <- factor(df1$x2 , levels=c(levels(df1$x2), levels(df2$x2)) )
 df1$x2[na.omit(match(df2$x1,df1$x1))] <- df2$x2[which(df2$x1 %in% df1$x1)]
 df1
#-----------
  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d

(Note that recent versions of R do not have stringsAsFactors set to TRUE in the data.frame function defaults, unlike it was for most of the history of R.)

2
  • 1
    Nice. Factors can be tricky and the advice to expand the levels is helpful. You do end up with an unneeded level in df1$x2 though (the xx). – Aaron left Stack Overflow May 24 '11 at 16:26
  • If you want to remove what are now superfluous levels, then do this: df1$x2 <- factor(df1$x2) – IRTFM May 24 '11 at 16:55
4

You can do it by matching the other way too but it's more complicated. Joris's solution is better but I'm putting this here also as a reminder to think about which way you want to match.

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4, x2=letters[1:4], stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
df2 <- data.frame(x1=2:3, x2=c("zz", "qq"), stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
swap <- df2$x2[match(df1$x1, df2$x1)]
ok <- !is.na(swap)
df1$x2[ok] <- swap[ok]

> df1
  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d
4

It can be done with dplyr.

library(dplyr)

full_join(df1,df2,by = c("x1" = "x1")) %>% 
  transmute(x1 = x1,x2 = coalesce(x2.y,x2.x))

  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d
3

new here, but using the following dplyr approach seems to work as well
similar but slightly different to one of the answers above

df3 <- anti_join(df1, df2, by = "x1")
df3 <- rbind(df3, df2)
df3

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