7

I want to invoke the window.setTimeot function with my custom scope so I use the call method, but there is something wrong.

function foo() {
    this.bar = function() {
        console.log("keep going");
        window.setTimeout.call(this,this.bar,100);
    }
    this.bar();
}

new foo;

under Firefox this prints to the console only 1 line and then nothing, and under google chrome it throws a TypeError.

What is the problem in my code?

8

Using call does not help here: it calls setTimeout with your this object, but the callback function itself is still called from the global scope. What you really want to do is something like this:

function foo() {
    var self = this;
    this.bar = function() {
        console.log("keep going");
        window.setTimeout(function() { self.bar(); }, 100);
    }
    this.bar();
}

Edit: If you really want something similar to the call approach, you can use bind which binds the this value for a function:

window.setTimeout(this.bar.bind(this), 100);

However, this is part of the new ECMAScript 5 spec which is not yet supported by all browsers.

  • thanks, i know that this way works, i am trying to use the call. – Gergely Fehérvári May 24 '11 at 14:55
  • 1
    @omnosis: You cannot use call for this purpose. What you're looking for is bind, which is part of the new ECMAScript 5 spec. Using that, you can do something like this: window.setTimeout(this.bar.bind(this), 100). – casablanca May 24 '11 at 14:57
  • makes perfect sense. I made the same mistake, makes no sense to use call on setTimeout because you're not trying to change the this of setTimeout, but rather, the function you are passing as an argument. cheers – chiliNUT Jul 29 '15 at 22:28

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