53

I want to parse 2 generators of (potentially) different length with zip:

for el1, el2 in zip(gen1, gen2):
    print(el1, el2)

However, if gen2 has less elements, one extra element of gen1 is "consumed".

For example,

def my_gen(n:int):
    for i in range(n):
        yield i

gen1 = my_gen(10)
gen2 = my_gen(8)

list(zip(gen1, gen2))  # Last tuple is (7, 7)
print(next(gen1))  # printed value is "9" => 8 is missing

gen1 = my_gen(8)
gen2 = my_gen(10)

list(zip(gen1, gen2))  # Last tuple is (7, 7)
print(next(gen2))  # printed value is "8" => OK

Apparently, a value is missing (8 in my previous example) because gen1 is read (thus generating the value 8) before it realizes gen2 has no more elements. But this value disappears in the universe. When gen2 is "longer", there is no such "problem".

QUESTION: Is there a way to retrieve this missing value (i.e. 8 in my previous example)? ... ideally with a variable number of arguments (like zip does).

NOTE: I have currently implemented in another way by using itertools.zip_longest but I really wonder how to get this missing value using zip or equivalent.

NOTE 2: I have created some tests of the different implementations in this REPL in case you want to submit and try a new implementation :) https://repl.it/@jfthuong/MadPhysicistChester

  • 21
    The docs do note that "zip() should only be used with unequal length inputs when you don’t care about trailing, unmatched values from the longer iterables. If those values are important, use itertools.zip_longest() instead.". – Carcigenicate Apr 9 at 16:58
  • 3
    @Ch3steR. But the question has nothing to do with "why". It literally reads "Is there a way to retrieve this missing value ...?" It seems that all the answers but mine conveniently forgot to read that part. – Mad Physicist Apr 9 at 17:28
  • 1
    @MadPhysicist Strange indeed. I rephrased the question to be clearer on that aspect. – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 3:07
  • 2
    The basic problem is that there's no way to peek or push back into a generator. So once zip() has read 8 from gen1, it's gone. – Barmar Apr 10 at 16:06
  • 2
    @Barmar definitely, we all agreed on that. The question was more how to store it somewhere to be able to use it. – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 17:02
31

One way would be to implement a generator that lets you cache the last value:

class cache_last(collections.abc.Iterator):
    """
    Wraps an iterable in an iterator that can retrieve the last value.

    .. attribute:: obj

       A reference to the wrapped iterable. Provided for convenience
       of one-line initializations.
    """
    def __init__(self, iterable):
        self.obj = iterable
        self._iter = iter(iterable)
        self._sentinel = object()

    @property
    def last(self):
        """
        The last object yielded by the wrapped iterator.

        Uninitialized iterators raise a `ValueError`. Exhausted
        iterators raise a `StopIteration`.
        """
        if self.exhausted:
            raise StopIteration
        return self._last

    @property
    def exhausted(self):
        """
        `True` if there are no more elements in the iterator.
        Violates EAFP, but convenient way to check if `last` is valid.
        Raise a `ValueError` if the iterator is not yet started.
        """
        if not hasattr(self, '_last'):
            raise ValueError('Not started!')
        return self._last is self._sentinel

    def __next__(self):
        """
        Retrieve, record, and return the next value of the iteration.
        """
        try:
            self._last = next(self._iter)
        except StopIteration:
            self._last = self._sentinel
            raise
        # An alternative that has fewer lines of code, but checks
        # for the return value one extra time, and loses the underlying
        # StopIteration:
        #self._last = next(self._iter, self._sentinel)
        #if self._last is self._sentinel:
        #    raise StopIteration
        return self._last

    def __iter__(self):
        """
        This object is already an iterator.
        """
        return self

To use this, wrap the inputs to zip:

gen1 = cache_last(range(10))
gen2 = iter(range(8))
list(zip(gen1, gen2))
print(gen1.last)
print(next(gen1)) 

It is important to make gen2 an iterator rather than an iterable, so you can know which one was exhausted. If gen2 is exhausted, you don't need to check gen1.last.

Another approach would be to override zip to accept a mutable sequence of iterables instead of separate iterables. That would allow you to replace iterables with a chained version that includes your "peeked" item:

def myzip(iterables):
    iterators = [iter(it) for it in iterables]
    while True:
        items = []
        for it in iterators:
            try:
                items.append(next(it))
            except StopIteration:
                for i, peeked in enumerate(items):
                    iterables[i] = itertools.chain([peeked], iterators[i])
                return
            else:
                yield tuple(items)

gens = [range(10), range(8)]
list(myzip(gens))
print(next(gens[0]))

This approach is problematic for many reasons. Not only will it lose the original iterable, but it will lose any of the useful properties the original object may have had by replacing it with a chain object.

| improve this answer | |
  • @MadPhysicist. Love your answer with cache_last, and the fact that it does not alter the next behavior ... so bad it's not symetric (switching gen1 and gen2 in the zip will leads to different results).Cheers – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 3:39
  • 1
    @Jean-Francois. I've updated the iterator to respond properly to last calls after it's exhausted. That should help in figuring out if you need the last value or not. Also makes it more production-y. – Mad Physicist Apr 10 at 4:32
  • @MadPhysicist I ran the code and the output of print(gen1.last) print(next(gen1)) is None and 9 – Ch3steR Apr 10 at 6:39
  • @MadPhysicist with some docstrings and all. Nice ;) I will check later when I have time. Thanks for the time spent – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 7:09
  • @Ch3steR. Thanks for the catch. I'd gotten too excited and deleted the return statement from last. – Mad Physicist Apr 10 at 13:40
18

This is zip implementation equivalent given in docs

def zip(*iterables):
    # zip('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax By
    sentinel = object()
    iterators = [iter(it) for it in iterables]
    while iterators:
        result = []
        for it in iterators:
            elem = next(it, sentinel)
            if elem is sentinel:
                return
            result.append(elem)
        yield tuple(result)

In your 1st example gen1 = my_gen(10) and gen2 = my_gen(8). After both the generators are consumed until 7th iteration. Now in 8th iteration gen1 calls elem = next(it, sentinel) which return 8 but when gen2 calls elem = next(it, sentinel) it returns sentinel(because at this gen2 is exhausted) and if elem is sentinel is satisfied and function executes return and stops. Now next(gen1) returns 9.

In your 2nd example gen1 = gen(8) and gen2 = gen(10). After both the generators are consumed until 7th iteration. Now in 8th iteration gen1 calls elem = next(it, sentinel) which returns sentinel(because at this point gen1 is exhausted) and if elem is sentinel is satisfied and the function executes return and stops. Now next(gen2) returns 8.

Inspired by Mad Physicist's answer, you could use this Gen wrapper to counter it:

Edit: To handle the cases pointed by Jean-Francois T.

Once a value is consumed from the iterator it's gone forever from the the iterator and there's no in-place mutating method for iterators to add it back to the iterator. One work around is to store the last consumed value.

class Gen:
    def __init__(self,iterable):
        self.d = iter(iterable)
        self.sentinel = object()
        self.prev = self.sentinel
    def __iter__(self):
        return self
    @property
    def last_val_consumed(self):
        if self.prev is None:
            raise StopIteration
        if self.prev == self.sentinel:
            raise ValueError('Nothing has been consumed')
        return self.prev
    def __next__(self):
        self.prev = next(self.d,None)
        if self.prev is None:
            raise StopIteration
        return self.prev

Examples:

# When `gen1` is larger than `gen2`
gen1 = Gen(range(10))
gen2 = Gen(range(8))
list(zip(gen1,gen2))
# [(0, 0), (1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6), (7, 7)]
gen1.last_val_consumed
# 8 #as it was the last values consumed
next(gen1)
# 9
gen1.last_val_consumed
# 9

# 2. When `gen1` or `gen2` is empty
gen1 = Gen(range(0))
gen2 = Gen(range(5))
list(zip(gen1,gen2))
gen1.last_val_consumed
# StopIteration error is raised
gen2.last_val_consumed
# ValueError is raised saying `ValueError: Nothing has been consumed`
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you @Ch3steR for the time spent on this problem. Your modification of MadPhysicist solution has several limitations: #1. If gen1 = cache_last(range(0)) and gen2 = cache_last(range(2)) then after doing list(zip(gen1, gen2), a call to next(gen2) will raise an AttributeError: 'cache_last' object has no attribute 'prev'. #2. If gen1 is longer than gen2, after consuming all elements, next(gen2) will keep on returning the last value instead of StopIteration. I will mark MadPhysicist answer and THE answer. Thanks! – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 3:37
  • @Jean-FrancoisT. Yes agreed. You should mark his answer as the answer. This has limitations. I'll try to improve this answer to counter all cases. ;) – Ch3steR Apr 10 at 3:40
  • @Ch3steR I can help you shaking it if you want. I'm a professional in the field of Software Validation :) – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 3:46
  • @Jean-FrancoisT. I would love to. It would mean a lot. I'm a 3rd-year undergrad student. – Ch3steR Apr 10 at 3:49
  • 2
    Good job, it passes all the tests I have written here: repl.it/@jfthuong/MadPhysicistChester You can run them online, pretty convenient :) – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 16:08
7

I can see you've found this answer already and it got brought up in the comments but I figured I'll make an answer out of it. You want to use itertools.zip_longest(), which will replace the empty values of the shorter generator with None:

import itertools

def my_gen(n:int):
    for i in range(n):
        yield i

gen1 = my_gen(10)
gen2 = my_gen(8)

for i, j in itertools.zip_longest(gen1, gen2):
    print(i, j)

Prints:

0 0
1 1
2 2
3 3
4 4
5 5
6 6
7 7
8 None
9 None

You can also supply a fillvalue argument when calling zip_longest to replace the None with a default value, but basically for your solution once you hit a None (either i or j) in the for loop, the other variable will have your 8.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks. I have indeed already came up with zip_longest and it was in my question actually. :) – Jean-Francois T. Apr 10 at 3:44
6

Inspired by @GrandPhuba's elucidation of zip, let's create a "safe" variant (unit-tested here):

def safe_zip(*args):
    """
    Safe zip that restores last consumed element in eachgenerator
    if not able to consume an element in all of them

    Returns:
        * generators in tuple
        * generator for zipped generators
    """
  continue_ = True
  n = len(args)
  result = (_ for _ in [])
  while continue_:
    addend = []
    for i, gen in enumerate(args):
      try:
        value = next(gen)
        addend.append(value)
      except StopIteration:
        genlist = list(args)
        args = tuple([chain([v], g) for v, g in zip(addend, genlist[:i])]+genlist[i:])
        continue_ = False
        break
    if len(addend)==n: result = chain(result, [tuple(addend)])
  return args, result

Here is a basic test:

    g1, g2 = (i for i in range(10)), (i for i in range(4))
    # Create (g1, g2), g3 first, then loop over g3 as one would with zip
    (g1, g2), g3 = safe_zip(g1, g2)
    for a, b in g3:
        print(a, b)#(0, 0) to (3, 3)
    for x in g1:
        print(x)#4 to 9
| improve this answer | |
4

you could use itertools.tee and itertools.islice:

from itertools import islice, tee

def zipped(gen1, gen2, pred=list):
    g11, g12 = tee(gen1)
    z = pred(zip(g11, gen2))

    return (islice(g12, len(z), None), gen2), z

gen1 = iter(range(10))
gen2 = iter(range(5))

(gen1, gen2), output = zipped(gen1, gen2)

print(output)
print(next(gen1))
# [(0, 0), (1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4)]
# 5
| improve this answer | |
3

If you want to reuse code, the easiest solution is:

from more_itertools import peekable

a = peekable(a)
b = peekable(b)

while True:
    try:
        a.peek()
        b.peek()
    except StopIteration:
        break
    x = next(a)
    y = next(b)
    print(x, y)


print(list(a), list(b))  # Misses nothing.

You can test this code out using your setup:

def my_gen(n: int):
    yield from range(n)

a = my_gen(10)
b = my_gen(8)

It will print:

0 0
1 1
2 2
3 3
4 4
5 5
6 6
7 7
[8, 9] []
| improve this answer | |
2

i don't think you can retrieve dropped value with basic for loop, because exhausted iterator, taken from zip(..., ...).__iter__ being dropped once exhausted and you cant access it.

You should mutate your zip, then you can get position of dropped item with some hacky code)

z = zip(range(10), range(8))
for _ in iter(z.__next__, None):
    ...
_, (one, other) = z.__reduce__()
_, (i_one,), p_one = one.__reduce__() # p_one == current pos, 1 based
import itertools
val = next(itertools.islice(iter(i_one), p_one - 1, p_one))
| improve this answer | |

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