1

I'm currently learning Python as I'm taking a data mining class. I was making a for-loop to make a noisy data file to do smoothing and I found a peculiarity on Python for-loop that I couldn't understand nor go around.

So I made this simple testing C++ and Python codes. C++ one works, but Python one doesn't.

The reason is that C++ allows arbitrary updates on the counter variable i within the for-loop block, but Python doesn't.

On Python code, I try to update i arbitrarily by doing i += 1 within the while-loop, but if you look at the outputs for At the first part of the loop, i = SOMETHING, Python is arbitrarily updating the i only in the while-loop that's in the for-loop, but then reverts the value back when it exits that while-loop. (Outputs are in the comments at the bottom)

Why is that? Is it a scope issue? (Both C++ and Python are statically scoped) Is it because of their types? (I'm only familiar with statically-typed languages like C++ and Java, and not dynamically-typed languages like Python)

On Python, it seems like the for-loop is actually a function with return-by-value parameter i which ignores all the changes on the parameter that took place inside the function.

I tried:

  • Setting the counter i as a global variable.
  • using range(0, len(input), *variable*), but I still failed to replicate it.
  • Researched if it can be solved by using Static variable or similar sort on Python (I think it's irrelevant?)

On Python, how would you replicate this C++ code? Could you enlighten me on why those for-loops behave differently? Thank you.

This is C++ code that's working correctly:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string input = "abc defg";
    string eachWord = "";

    for(int i = 0; i < input.length(); i++)
    {
        cout << "At the first part of the loop, i = " << i << " ." << endl;

        while(input[i] != ' ' && input[i] != '\0')
        {
            eachWord += input[i];
            i++;
        }

        cout << eachWord << endl;
        cout << "At the last part of the loop, i = " << i << " ." << endl << endl;
        eachWord = "";
    }
}

/*
Output:
At the first part of the loop, i = 0 .
abc
At the last part of the loop, i = 3 .

At the first part of the loop, i = 4 .
defg
At the last part of the loop, i = 8 .
*/

And this is the Python code that's not working correctly, that I tried to make to replicate the C++ code:

input = "abc defg"
eachWord = ''

for i in range(len(input)):
    print("At the first part of the loop, i = ", i, ".")
    while(input[i] != ' ' and input[i] != '\0'):
        eachWord += input[i]
        i += 1

    print(eachWord)
    print("At the last part of the loop, i = ", i, ".")
    print()
    eachWord = ''

"""
Output:
At the first part of the loop, i =  0 .
abc
At the last part of the loop, i =  3 .

At the first part of the loop, i =  1 .
bc
At the last part of the loop, i =  3 .

At the first part of the loop, i =  2 .
c
At the last part of the loop, i =  3 .

At the first part of the loop, i =  3 .

At the last part of the loop, i =  3 .

At the first part of the loop, i =  4 .
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "main.py", line 6, in <module>
    while(input[i] != ' ' and input[i] != '\0'):
IndexError: string index out of range
"""
9
  • maxLen = len(input) then i = 0 then while i < maxLen: and at the end of the loop i+=1
    – Raffallo
    Apr 10 '20 at 13:25
  • 1
    I don't think you should be replicating your c++ code in Python. Python style is different and should be approached differently. For ex: for your example there are more one line / pythonic codes you could write.
    – Austin
    Apr 10 '20 at 13:30
  • 1
    "On Python, it seems like the for-loop is actually a function with return-by-value parameter i which ignores all the changes on the parameter that took place inside the function." That is not too far off from what is actually happening. At each iteration of the for loop, i is indeed replaced by the next value of range(len(input)), regardless of what happens to i in the loop body.
    – jjramsey
    Apr 10 '20 at 13:33
  • if you want to split to words then you need only "abc defg".split() and you don't have to create all this loop.
    – furas
    Apr 10 '20 at 13:37
  • Thank you guys! I just 'assumed' that all for-loops of different languages should behave the same. Apr 10 '20 at 13:39
2

There are two main problems with the python I see;

Firstly the for loop does not work in the same way as the cpp for loop: python will reset i to go through the range, what you did with i inside the previous loops will be lost. Secondly python does not have a termination char on its strings like cpp does:

input = "abc defg"
eachWord = ''

i = 0
while(i < len(input)):
    print("At the first part of the loop, i = ", i, ".")
    while(i < len(input) and input[i] != ' '):
        eachWord += input[i]
        i += 1

    print(eachWord)
    print("At the last part of the loop, i = ", i, ".")
    print()
    eachWord = ''
    i += 1
4
  • Aha. Now I see why some example Python codes that I saw previously did not use for loop which I thought would be more convenient, and rather used while loops with separate counter declaration outside of the loops. Thank you! Apr 10 '20 at 13:46
  • But why would developers not make consistent for-loop behaviors...? I'm very confused about that. Apr 10 '20 at 13:47
  • @HamInCheese Guido van Rossum (author of Python) created this type of for-loop because it tried to create language which is easy to learn and has code easy to read. He resigned for many elements which make problems in other languages.
    – furas
    Apr 10 '20 at 13:55
  • Well you can see that this is more overhead for the python "for". It has more state than just i, it must remember the entire range whilst its doing the calculation (which isnt much overhead for a range object as its an iterator but could be a list etc). This is in general why programming languages differ; they have different design goals/have a different idea of how to accomplish these or in some cases are too far down the line to change it. In general python accepts more overhead for ease of use
    – Helios
    Apr 10 '20 at 13:55
2

First, replicating a c/c++ structure is not the best way to approach solving a problem. You will inevitably end up fighting against the language instead of benefiting from its strengths.

Secondly, to convert a c/c++ for loop, you have to realize that it is actually a while in disguise:

for (<initialization>,<condition>,<increment>)
{
    // your stuff
}

Because Python for loops override the control variable (i) at each iteration, they can not translate directly to C/C++ loops that modify the control variable within their code block. These kinds of loops translate to this in Python (which is unwieldy and cumbersome):

<initialization>
while <condition>:
     # your stuff
     <increment>

for your particular example:

i = 0
while i < len(input):
   # ...
   i += 1

A more pythonic translation of you code would look more like this:

eachword = ''
for character in input:
    if  character in [' ','\0']: # will drop last word because no \0 at end of strings
        print(eachword)
        eachword = ''
    else:
        eachword += character 

strings in python don't have a nul character at the end so the last word will likely be dropped unless your input comes from a non-standard source

Python has a built-in function to separate words in a string:

for eachword in input.split():
    print(eachword)
1
  • 'benefiting from its strength'... thank you for a piece of big advice! I guess I'll have to think differently to adapt to Pythonic style. Apr 10 '20 at 13:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.