0

I'm trying to use c++ vectors to store pointers to a structure like so :

  struct SourceDir {
    int id;
    const unsigned char *alias;
    const unsigned char *description;
    const unsigned char *path;
  };

but then, I cannot retrieve the value, which seems corrupted

      std::vector<SourceDir*> source_dirs;
      while ((step = sqlite3_step(stmt)) != SQLITE_DONE) {
        if (step != SQLITE_ROW) {
          std::cerr << "[ERROR] internal error (SQLite error code" << step << ")\n";
          exit(1);
        }

        struct SourceDir *sourceDir = new SourceDir;
        sourceDir->id = sqlite3_column_int(stmt, 0);
        sourceDir->alias = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 1);
        sourceDir->path = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 2);
        sourceDir->description = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 3);

        source_dirs.push_back(sourceDir);
      }

      for (std::vector<SourceDir*>::iterator it = source_dirs.begin() ; it != source_dirs.end() ; ++it) {
        SourceDir *s = *it;
        std::cerr << s->description << "\n";
      }

it gives random values like so :

@O?V
@O?V

I don't understand what I did wrong

3
  • sqlite functions return pointers to internal memory associated with the statement handle, which get destroyed quickly. Your saved pointers end up pointing to worthless garbage. You should consult your C++ textbook for more information and understanding on how to manage memory in C++ applications. Apr 10, 2020 at 17:46
  • Why don't you immediately take what those sqllite function's return, and create real std::string's out of them, instead of having unsigned char * pointers in your struct? Apr 10, 2020 at 17:54
  • Thank you for suggestion, I'm going to try that
    – Nelson Z.
    Apr 10, 2020 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

0

C strings are of type char* or const char*. Because they are so common and still important, there is an additional overload for the << operator in std::ostream. This particular overload for char* prints the dereferenced characters until it finds the null byte.

However, unsigned char* is a different type, and another overload will be used. Here, simply the pointer value is printed. That is what you see.

Solution: Just change your string members to const char*.

Edit: This answer is simply wrong. The same C String overload is also chosen for unsigned char*.

3
  • Sorry, it didn't changed the result.. I changed my struct to having const char* members, and then I did a cast when calling sqlite3_column_text to (const char*) but It's still printing pointer values..
    – Nelson Z.
    Apr 10, 2020 at 18:03
  • You're absolutely right, my reference was outdated.
    – flowit
    Apr 10, 2020 at 18:10
  • Thank you for trying to help me !
    – Nelson Z.
    May 6, 2020 at 20:44
0

The pointers are good, but contents of the memory they point to probably changed (e.g. here: https://sqlite.org/capi3ref.html#sqlite3_column_blob you can read that returned pointer is valid only for some time).

In general, avoid using raw pointers in C++. In this case you can just use std::string to copy data provided by sqlite.

Compare this code which makes few small changes to avoid manual memory management and raw pointers:

struct SourceDir
{
        int id;
        std::string alias;
        std::string description;
        std::string path;
};



std::vector<SourceDir> source_dirs;
while ((step = sqlite3_step(stmt)) != SQLITE_DONE) {
        if (step != SQLITE_ROW) {
                std::cerr << "[ERROR] internal error (SQLite error code" << step << ")\n";
                exit(1);
        }

        source_dirs.emplace_back();
        auto& sourceDir = source_dirs.back();
        sourceDir.id = sqlite3_column_int(stmt, 0);
        sourceDir.alias = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 1);
        sourceDir.path = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 2);
        sourceDir.description = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 3);
}

for (const auto& s : source_dirs)
{
        std::cerr << s.description << "\n";
}
1
  • Thank you Slimak !
    – Nelson Z.
    May 6, 2020 at 20:45
0

The data returned from sqlite3_column_text is owned by sqlite3 library and it is available in that moment only. We need to save it to our own space before reading the next column or the next row. The same data inside sqlite3 will be used to store the new returned data. Here is an example which you can try to fix the issue.

struct SourceDir {
  int id;
  unsigned char *alias;
  unsigned char *description;
  unsigned char *path;
};

std::vector<SourceDir*> source_dirs;
while ((step = sqlite3_step(stmt)) != SQLITE_DONE) {
  if (step != SQLITE_ROW) {
    std::cerr << "[ERROR] internal error (SQLite error code" << step << ")\n";
    exit(1);
  }
  struct SourceDir *sourceDir = new SourceDir;
  sourceDir->id = sqlite3_column_int(stmt, 0);
  const unsigned char *col = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 1);
  sourceDir->alias = new unsigned char[strlen(col)+1];
  strcpy((char *)sourceDir->alias, col);
  col = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 2);
  sourceDir->path = new unsigned char[strlen(col)+1];
  strcpy((char *)sourceDir->path, col);
  col = sqlite3_column_text(stmt, 3);
  sourceDir->description = new unsigned char[strlen(col)+1];
  strcpy((char *)sourceDir->description, col);
  source_dirs.push_back(sourceDir);
}

std::vector<SourceDir *>::iterator it = source_dirs.begin();
for (; it != source_dirs.end() ; ++it)
  std::cout << (*it)->id << " \"" << (*it)->alias << "\" \"" 
            << (*it)->path << "\" \"" << (*it)->description 
            << "\"\n";

//to clean up
it = source_dirs.begin();
for (; it != source_dirs.end(); it++) {
  delete [] (*it)->alias;
  delete [] (*it)->path;
  delete [] (*it)->description;
  delete *it;
}
source_dirs.clear();

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