1

I have multiple scenarios where, based on a condition, I need to do asynchronous processing and later proceed regardless of the path taken. This code works as I expect:

  let processingComplete = new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { }); // create pending promise
  let condition = true; 

  var wait = function () {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      setTimeout(resolve, 500);
    });
  }

  if (condition) {
    processingComplete = wait();
  } else {
    // do something else, synchronously  
    processingComplete = Promise.resolve();
  }

  processingComplete.then(() => {
    console.log("entering processingComplete.then...")
  });

However, if the promises are nested more than one deep the .then clause never fires. For example,

  let processingComplete = new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { }); // create pending promise
  let condition = true; 

  var wait = function () {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      setTimeout(resolve, 500);
    });
  }

  if (condition) {
    wait()
    .then(() => {
      processingComplete = wait() // nesting of promises
    })
  } else {
    // do something else, synchronously 
    processingComplete = Promise.resolve();
  }

  processingComplete.then(() => {
    // this code never fires with nested promises
    console.log("entering processingComplete.then...")
  });

I'm certainly familiar with using promises, but I'm not understanding why this does't work. I'd welcome any insights.

3
  • You'd get a lot more helpful answers if you showed a REAL problem with REAL code rather than just this make-up scenario. Theoretical examples don't get nearly as useful feedback and help as showing us your real world code where we can make suggestions about things you didn't even think of to ask about that are related to the question. We can show you the best way to solve your actual, real problem.
    – jfriend00
    Apr 10 '20 at 20:18
  • 1
    Your second one just assigns processingComplete too late, AFTER you try to use it. You need to change your promises properly: processingComplete = wait().then(wait);
    – jfriend00
    Apr 10 '20 at 20:19
  • @jfriend00 Yes, moving the promise works just as you said. Thanks!
    – David
    Apr 10 '20 at 20:40
1

Dealing with lots of promises is sometimes better done with async / await. In your example, you are assigning processingComplete a value after you called processingComplete.then(...). This might help:

let processingComplete = new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { });
let condition = true; 

var wait = function () {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    setTimeout(resolve, 500);
  });
}

async function run() {
  if (condition) {
    await wait()
    processingComplete = wait()
  } else {
    processingComplete = Promise.resolve();
  }

  processingComplete.then(() => {
    console.log("entering processingComplete.then...")
  });
}

run()
1

Your second one just assigns processingComplete too late inside a .then() handler that gets called later AFTER you try to use it. You need to change your promises properly:

processingComplete = wait().then(wait);

Or, if there's other processing in the real code:

processingComplete = wait().then(() => {
    // ... other code here
    return wait();
});

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