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Thank you for taking a look at this...

Here's my problem; in my react native app I have written a React Context that manages "Header Messages" that I can call anywhere in the code base and attach a message under the Header element of my app (Displayed Globally). This process works and I am able to render my first Header Message that I add using the helper function .addNewMessage('id', 'JSX.Element'); but when I call this again; the previous message is removed and the new message is displayed...

I believe this is happening because because the function .addNewMessage() defined in the context shared below references state... Calling it updates state... then calling it again; its still referencing the original state... See the console logs to see how this plays out with two subsequent calls.

Code Behind the Context; Helper functions are declared in the function...

import * as React from 'react';
import { Text } from 'react-native';

export interface IElements {
  [key: string] : JSX.Element;
}

export interface IState {
  setState : (newState: IState) => void;
  addNewMessage : (id: string, elem: JSX.Element) => void;
  removeMessage : (id: string) => void;
  returnAllMessages : () => JSX.Element[]
  messages : IElements;
}

export interface IProps {
  children : JSX.Element[] | JSX.Element;
}

const defaultValues: IState = {
  setState: () => undefined,
  addNewMessage: () => undefined,
  removeMessage: () => undefined,
  returnAllMessages: () => [],
  messages : {'test1': <Text>FooBarLoremIpsum</Text>},
};

export const HeaderMessagesContext: React.Context<IState> = React.createContext<IState>(defaultValues);

const CTX_HeaderMessages: React.FC<IProps> = (props: IProps) => {
  const [state, updateState] = React.useState(defaultValues);

  // Every time I call this function, it is acting like it is using
  // defaultValues instead of state... I assume this is a weird side effect
  // of defining a function then storing an instance of that function inside
  // the state object itself...? But anytime I try and declare a side effect
  // that would essentially store a new instance of the function; I find myself
  // in an infinite Loop... I'm struggling with the pattern here to make this work :/
  const addNewMessage = (id: string, elem : JSX.Element) => {
    console.log('State Coming into "AddNewMessage"', state);
    const newMessages = {...state.messages};
    newMessages[id] = elem;
    console.log('State Exiting "AddNewMessage"', {...state, messages : newMessages});
    updateState({...state, messages : newMessages});
  };
  const removeMessage = (id: string) => { if(state.messages[id]) {delete state.messages[id]} }
  const returnAllMessages = () => Object.keys(state.messages).map(key => state.messages[key]);

  const val: IState = {
    ...state,
    setState : updateState,
    addNewMessage,
    removeMessage,
    returnAllMessages
  }

  return (
    <HeaderMessagesContext.Provider value={val}>
      {props.children}
    </HeaderMessagesContext.Provider>
  );
};

export default CTX_HeaderMessages;

Chrome Console Logs

These logs show what I am experiencing... I'd like to draw your attention to the value of the messages object. When I call the function the first time; the value is added; when I call the function a second time; Notice the value from the first call (on the previous line) is not present...

State Comming into "AddNewMessage" 
    {messages: {…}, setState: ƒ, addNewMessage: ƒ, removeMessage: ƒ, returnAllMessages: ƒ}
    addNewMessage: ƒ addNewMessage()
    messages: {test1: {…}}
    removeMessage: ƒ removeMessage()
    returnAllMessages: ƒ returnAllMessages()
    setState: ƒ setState()
    __proto__: Object

HeaderMessages.tsx:38 State Exiting "AddNewMessage" 
    {messages: {…}, setState: ƒ, addNewMessage: ƒ, removeMessage: ƒ, returnAllMessages: ƒ}
    addNewMessage: ƒ addNewMessage()
    messages: {test1: {…}, SuggestUpdate_Line78: {…}}
    removeMessage: ƒ removeMessage()
    returnAllMessages: ƒ returnAllMessages()
    setState: ƒ setState()
    __proto__: Object

HeaderMessages.tsx:35 State Comming into "AddNewMessage" 
    {messages: {…}, setState: ƒ, addNewMessage: ƒ, removeMessage: ƒ, returnAllMessages: ƒ}
    addNewMessage: ƒ addNewMessage()
    messages: {test1: {…}}
    removeMessage: ƒ removeMessage()
    returnAllMessages: ƒ returnAllMessages()
    setState: ƒ setState()
    __proto__: Object

HeaderMessages.tsx:38 State Exiting "AddNewMessage" 
    {messages: {…}, setState: ƒ, addNewMessage: ƒ, removeMessage: ƒ, returnAllMessages: ƒ}
    addNewMessage: ƒ addNewMessage()
    messages: {test1: {…}, SuggestUpdate_Line79: {…}}
    removeMessage: ƒ removeMessage()
    returnAllMessages: ƒ returnAllMessages()
    setState: ƒ setState()
    __proto__: Object
2
  • 1
    Your code should look ok, the only method that looks weird is the removeMessage method, you should always keep your state as pure as possible, so you should clone your state without the message id that you wish to remove, so right now you are modifying the state reference instead of update the state with new one object state without the message that need to be removed Apr 10 '20 at 23:02
  • 1
    delete will not work correctly, the change won't be propagated on its own. You need to create a new Object. if(id in messages) { const { [id]:_, ...newMessages } = messages; updateState(...); }
    – Thomas
    Apr 10 '20 at 23:34
1

Passing setState in your context is redundant I think. and you just need to store the messages in your state, not the CRUD methods. take a look at below code, I think it'll work.

import * as React from 'react';
import { Text } from 'react-native';

export interface IElements {
  [key: string] : JSX.Element;
}

export interface IState {
  addNewMessage : (id: string, elem: JSX.Element) => void;
  removeMessage : (id: string) => void;
  returnAllMessages : () => JSX.Element[]
  messages : IElements;
}

export interface IProps {
  children : JSX.Element[] | JSX.Element;
}

const defaultValues: IState = {
  addNewMessage: () => undefined,
  removeMessage: () => undefined,
  returnAllMessages: () => [],
  messages: { test1: <Text>FooBarLoremIpsum</Text> },
};

const defaultMessages : IElements = {
  messages: { test1: <Text>FooBarLoremIpsum</Text> },
};

export const HeaderMessagesContext: React.Context<IState> = React.createContext<IState>(defaultValues);

const CTX_HeaderMessages: React.FC<IProps> = (props: IProps) => {
  const [state, updateState] = React.useState<IElements>(defaultMessages);

  // Every time I call this function, it is acting like it is using
  // defaultValues instead of state... I assume this is a weird side effect
  // of defining a function then storing an instance of that function inside
  // the state object itself...? But anytime I try and declare a side effect
  // that would essentially store a new instance of the function; I find myself
  // in an infinite Loop... I'm struggling with the pattern here to make this work :/
  const addNewMessage = (id: string, elem : JSX.Element) => {
    console.log('State Coming into "AddNewMessage"', state);
    const newMessages = { ...state };
    newMessages[id] = elem;
    console.log('State Exiting "AddNewMessage"', newMessages);
    updateState(newMessages);
  };
  const removeMessage = (id: string) => { if (state[id]) { delete state[id]; } };
  const returnAllMessages = () => Object.keys(state).map((key) => state[key]);

  const val: IState = {
    messages: state,
    addNewMessage,
    removeMessage,
    returnAllMessages,
  };

  return (
    <HeaderMessagesContext.Provider value={val}>
      {props.children}
    </HeaderMessagesContext.Provider>
  );
};

export default CTX_HeaderMessages;
1
  • 1
    This change did work for me, thank you... I think the primary change (after diffing your modifications to the code) that solved it is that I was storing my functions inside my state {func1, func2, func3, messages:{}} But your code made me realize I don't need to do that; because i'm passing value={val} not value={state}... so now my state is just a object of messages rather nesting objects and storing instances of functions unnecessarily... Also yes, I agree passing setState is redundant; unfortunately this is an artifact of a past implementation before I added helper functions. :) - Thanks!:) Apr 11 '20 at 1:38

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