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So in the code below everything worked fine, until I got down to my first if statement. I kept getting the wrong results in test because I had (crazyString = char + crazyString) instead of what I have below. I now understand I could have used +=, but i was just wondering how come addition order is so strict in javascript.

const crazyCaps = (origString) => {
   let crazyString = '';
   for (let i = 0; i < origString.length; i++) {
      let char = origString[i];
      if (i % 2 === 1) { 
         char = char.toUpperCase();
         crazyString = crazyString + char;
      } else {
         crazyString = crazyString + origString[i];
      }    
   }
   return crazyString;
};
3
  • Because crazyString = char + crazyString will prepend the char, not append it Apr 10, 2020 at 23:55
  • 'but i was just wondering how come addition order is so strict in javascript' - because + on strings denotes concatenation, not addition.
    – collapsar
    Apr 11, 2020 at 0:00
  • Also note that expressions in JS may have side effects on data referenced in subexpressions, so even if an operator in JS implements a commutative mathematical function, it would be a bad idea to let commutativity carry over from the mathematical domain. Example (admittedly, a contrived one): let a=1; a + (() => { a += 4; return a; })(); vs. let a=1; (() => { a += 4; return a; })() + a;.
    – collapsar
    Apr 11, 2020 at 0:10

1 Answer 1

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'+' with strings is concatenation and not addition

Example:

  • 'A' + 'B' becomes AB
  • 'B' + 'A' becomes BA // not AB !!

const crazyCaps = (origString) => {
  let crazyString = '';
  for (let i = 0; i < origString.length; i++) {
    let char = origString[i];
    if (i % 2 === 1) {
      char = char.toUpperCase();
      crazyString = char + crazyString;
      // You are pre-pending Capital Letter to output String
    } else {
      crazyString = crazyString + origString[i];
    }
    // Iterations for an input of krishna: 
    // <Char> <crazyString>
    // k
    // Rk
    // Rki
    // SRki
    // SRkih
    // NSRkih
    // NSRkiha
  }
  return crazyString;
};

console.log(crazyCaps("krishna"));

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