3

I have the following code and its output printed below. I can't seem to understand why one set of braced initialization results in the move constructor being called, while the other results in the copy constructor. I have somewhat narrowed it down to direct-list-initialization vs copy-list-initialization per https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/list_initialization I just can't quite figure out which case my code belongs to. Thanks in advance.

#include <cstdint>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Foo {
  Foo() {
    cout << "create foo\n";
  }

  ~Foo() {
    cout << "delete foo\n";
  }

  Foo(const Foo& f) {
    cout << "copy foo\n";
  }

  Foo(Foo&& f) noexcept {
    cout << "move foo\n";
  }

  Foo& operator=(const Foo& f) = delete;

  Foo& operator=(Foo&& f) = delete;
};

int32_t main() {
  pair<uint32_t, Foo> f1{0, Foo{}};  // Calls move ctor
  cout << "------------------------\n";

  pair<uint32_t, Foo> f2{0, {}};     // Calls copy ctor
  cout << "------------------------\n";

  return 0;
}

This results in

create foo

move foo

delete foo

------------------------

create foo

copy foo

delete foo

------------------------

delete foo

delete foo
4

Let's take a look at two of the two-argument constructors of pair: [pairs.pair]

EXPLICIT constexpr pair(const T1& x, const T2& y);
template<class U1, class U2> EXPLICIT constexpr pair(U1&& x, U2&& y);

The second constructor uses perfect forwarding, and U2 cannot be deduced from {}. Therefore, the first version is selected when {} is used. When Foo{} is used instead, the argument has type Foo, so U2 is deduced to be Foo, causing the forwarding version to be selected.

9
  • While your explanation makes sense about the compiler choosing which version to call, I can't seem to convince myself that it is indeed the case. I specified the Foo constructor as 'explicit' and I get an error that reads: error: converting to 'const Foo' from initializer list would use explicit constructor 'Foo::Foo()'
    – tree
    Apr 11 '20 at 2:56
  • @tree Are you using C++17? In C++17, both of these constructors are conditionally explicit, i.e., explicit if any of the constructors they need call is explicit. They were unconditionally explicit in previous versions, and the change to conditional explicit was applied as a Defect Report.
    – L. F.
    Apr 11 '20 at 3:00
  • Yes, I am using c++17. So what you're saying is because I declared my Foo constructor explicit, I MUST use Foo{} instead of {}.
    – tree
    Apr 11 '20 at 3:04
  • @tree Oh, you mean the compiler rejected {}? Yeah, in that case explicit constructors are not considered, since argument passing is copy-initialization (i.e., non-explicit initialization).
    – L. F.
    Apr 11 '20 at 3:05
  • Yes, the moment I added the explicit to the Foo constructor, the compiler rejected the {} initialization for Foo
    – tree
    Apr 11 '20 at 3:06

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