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I want to convert local datetime to unix timestamp(seconds) using Moment js. I have used following formulas:-

moment().unix() moment(new Date()).format("X")

Example:-

a) IST Time - 11th April 2020 11:45 AM , UNIX Timestamp - 1586605500 (In Seconds)

b) UTC Time - 11th April 2020 06:15 AM , UNIX Timestamp - 1586585700 (In Seconds)

I am expecting to get result a) as Unix Timestamp but I am getting b) instead. How to resolve this problem in easy way using Moment JS?

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    I think you're confused about what a Unix timestamp is. It is always a number of seconds since the Unix epoch, defined as 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z. It indicates an instant in time, not a local time in a specific time zone. There's no such things "UNIX timestamp of local timestamp" If you understand that, it would be helpful if you'd clarify your question, in particular giving concrete examples.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 11 '20 at 5:56
  • I know about UNIX timestamp. May be my interpretation of asked question was not correct. I have edited my questions with example to help you understand my problem better. Apr 11 '20 at 6:12
  • I would strongly advise you to remove the notion of "local unix timestamp" from the question, given that that's not a valid concept - it's like asking for a "local UTC time".
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 11 '20 at 6:14
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    But fundamentally your first example is incorrect, and suggests you don't yet understand Unix timestamps. A Unix timestamp of 1586605500 represents 2020-04-11T11:45:00Z - at that instant in time, it will be 5:15pm in India. At 11:45am in India, the Unix timestamp was 1586585700. Unix timestamps have no concept of time zones - they just present an instant in time. If people from two different countries were having a conversation, they'd both agree on "the current Unix timestamp" even if their watches showed different times.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 11 '20 at 6:15
  • I want to get number of seconds passed since the unix epoch(1970-01-01T00:00:00Z) from local time zone(IST in my example) and not from UTC. Is that possible? Apr 11 '20 at 6:20
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There's no such thing as a "local Unix timestamp". A Unix timestamp measures the number of seconds1 since the Unix epoch, which is defined as midnight on January 1st 1970 UTC.

This means that at any given instant in time, the current Unix timestamp is the same everywhere in the world. If people from two different countries were having a conversation, they'd both agree on "the current Unix timestamp" even if their watches showed different times.

So result b in your question is already correct: when it was 11:45am on April 11th 2020 in India, the Unix timestamp was 1586585700. Anything expecting 1586605500 isn't expecting a Unix timestamp. Rather than try to provide the result that that code expects, I would to correct that code to expect a Unix timestamp - or get it to expect a local value in some other form.


1 At least traditionally. The idea of "a Unix timestamp but in milliseconds, or microseconds, or nanoseconds" makes perfect sense, and doesn't change any of the rest of this answer.

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