46

I have the following structure in my application:

<div id="container">
  <div id="child_container">
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    ...
    <div class="child"></div>
  </div>
</div>

Each child div has a known fixed width, but the application allows more of them to be inserted in the child_container div.

What I'm trying to do is to have the container div expand horizontally when needed, given the total width of the child container.

This is what happens currently:

+------ container -------+
+--- child_container ----+
| child1 child2 child3   |
| child4                 |
+------------------------+

If I set the child_container div width to a fixed value, I can get it to expand horizontally past the container div, which works despite being a bit ugly:

+------ container -------+
+------ child_container -+----+
| child1 child2 child3 child4 |
+------------------------+----+

However, that requires recalculating it whenever a new child is added.

Is there a way to do this without using fixed widths for child container, in a way such that the end result is

+--------- container ---------+
+------ child_container ------+
| child1 child2 child3 child4 |
+-----------------------------+

Thanks.

  • Please provide some code. In a fiddle is even better. – Ortiga May 24 '11 at 18:55
  • 1
    Here it is: jsfiddle.net/8XGqs – Andre May 24 '11 at 19:51
  • jsfiddle.net/8XGqs/1 illustrates the equivalent of the ascii art above better, I think. Just added width:100% to #container. – Andre May 24 '11 at 19:59
31

Something like this should work:

#container, #child_container, .child { 
    position: relative; 
    float: left;
}
  • 3
    @thirtydot because of how some browsers render the html. without telling it the position some browsers won't use the sizes of 'child' elements to increase the size of the containers – wajiw May 24 '11 at 19:13
  • 1
    This is good... although you may not need the position:relative; – Jason Gennaro May 24 '11 at 19:15
  • 1
    @wajiw: Which browsers? I assume you're talking about some really old browser. – thirtydot May 24 '11 at 19:17
  • 3
    @thirtydot yeah it's more a habit of mine working with IE6/7 =) not as relevant now but it's a good practice for containers. – wajiw May 24 '11 at 19:30
  • 1
    Can you have a look at jsfiddle.net/8XGqs/1 ? It doesn't seem to work on that example, even though everything has "float:left;". – Andre May 25 '11 at 16:54
32

Even easier:

<style>
    #container{ display: inline-block; }
</style>
12

The parent container won't grow when a child element is added.

+------ container -------+
+--- child_container ----+
| child1 child2 child3   |
| child4                 |
+------------------------+

but we can avoid the rendering of new one on the next line by using css3 flex box. The sample is placed the below mentioned path

  .products{
            display: -webkit-flex;
            -webkit-flex-flow: row;
            /*-webkit-justify-content: center;*/
        }
        .products > div{
            padding: 0 4em;
        }

The result will look like this:

+--- child_container ----+|
| child1 child2 child3  ch|ild4 child5  
|                         |
+------------------------+
  • but the width of container doesn't grow, do it? – alumi Jul 27 '18 at 4:12
2

If you float everything left including the containing divs, it will work.

2

The modern solution today would be

#child_container {
    display: flex;
}

Because flex-wrap is by default set to

flex-wrap: nowrap;

This simple solution works like a charm. And by now also in all relevant browsers.

-9

just set the width of the parent to 120% and done =)

  • 3
    That will allow a few more elements, what about more stuff coming in? – Om Shankar Jul 5 '13 at 9:17

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