How do I get the current weeknumber of the year, like PHP's date('W')?

It should be the ISO-8601 week number of year, weeks starting on Monday.

  • Look <a href="javascript.about.com/library/blweekyear.htm">; <b>here</b></a>, which was the first link given when I googled 'javascript week of year'. – Pete Wilson May 24 '11 at 23:07
  • +1 Lol! That's where I got the snippet from myself, but I couldn't remember the source as I got it a while ago. – Tom Chantler May 24 '11 at 23:11
  • @Pete: That code gets 22 as the current week. While it should be 21 – PeeHaa May 24 '11 at 23:20
  • @Pete: :D Nopez a simple -1 won't do the trick :P That wouldn't get the ISO-8601 weeknumber. A week in ISO-8601 starts on monday. The first week is the week with the year's first Thursday in it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO-8601 . PS wasn't me who downvoted you. – PeeHaa May 25 '11 at 20:50

15 Answers 15

up vote 206 down vote accepted

You should be able to get what you want here: http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-date6.htm#YWD.

A better link on the same site is: Working with weeks.

Edit

Here is some code based on the links provided and that posted eariler by Dommer. It has been lightly tested against results at http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-date6.htm#YWD. Please test thoroughly, no guarantee provided.

Edit 2017

There was an issue with dates during the period that daylight saving was observed and years where 1 Jan was Friday. Fixed by using all UTC methods. The following returns identical results to Moment.js.

/* For a given date, get the ISO week number
 *
 * Based on information at:
 *
 *    http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/weekcalc.htm#WNR
 *
 * Algorithm is to find nearest thursday, it's year
 * is the year of the week number. Then get weeks
 * between that date and the first day of that year.
 *
 * Note that dates in one year can be weeks of previous
 * or next year, overlap is up to 3 days.
 *
 * e.g. 2014/12/29 is Monday in week  1 of 2015
 *      2012/1/1   is Sunday in week 52 of 2011
 */
function getWeekNumber(d) {
    // Copy date so don't modify original
    d = new Date(Date.UTC(d.getFullYear(), d.getMonth(), d.getDate()));
    // Set to nearest Thursday: current date + 4 - current day number
    // Make Sunday's day number 7
    d.setUTCDate(d.getUTCDate() + 4 - (d.getUTCDay()||7));
    // Get first day of year
    var yearStart = new Date(Date.UTC(d.getUTCFullYear(),0,1));
    // Calculate full weeks to nearest Thursday
    var weekNo = Math.ceil(( ( (d - yearStart) / 86400000) + 1)/7);
    // Return array of year and week number
    return [d.getUTCFullYear(), weekNo];
}

var result = getWeekNumber(new Date());
document.write('It\'s currently week ' + result[1] + ' of ' + result[0]);

Hours are zeroed when creating the "UTC" date.

Minimized, prototype version (returns only week-number):

Date.prototype.getWeekNumber = function(){
  var d = new Date(Date.UTC(this.getFullYear(), this.getMonth(), this.getDate()));
  var dayNum = d.getUTCDay() || 7;
  d.setUTCDate(d.getUTCDate() + 4 - dayNum);
  var yearStart = new Date(Date.UTC(d.getUTCFullYear(),0,1));
  return Math.ceil((((d - yearStart) / 86400000) + 1)/7)
};

document.write('The current ISO week number is ' + new Date().getWeekNumber());

Test section

In this section, you can enter any date in YYYY-MM-DD format and check that this code gives the same week number as Moment.js ISO week number (tested over 50 years from 2000 to 2050).

Date.prototype.getWeekNumber = function(){
  var d = new Date(Date.UTC(this.getFullYear(), this.getMonth(), this.getDate()));
  var dayNum = d.getUTCDay() || 7;
  d.setUTCDate(d.getUTCDate() + 4 - dayNum);
  var yearStart = new Date(Date.UTC(d.getUTCFullYear(),0,1));
  return Math.ceil((((d - yearStart) / 86400000) + 1)/7)
};

function checkWeek() {
  var s = document.getElementById('dString').value;
  var m = moment(s, 'YYYY-MM-DD');
  document.getElementById('momentWeek').value = m.format('W');
  document.getElementById('answerWeek').value = m.toDate().getWeekNumber();      
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.18.1/moment.min.js"></script>

Enter date  YYYY-MM-DD: <input id="dString" value="2021-02-22">
<button onclick="checkWeek(this)">Check week number</button><br>
Moment: <input id="momentWeek" readonly><br>
Answer: <input id="answerWeek" readonly>

  • 6
    This code calculates January 2nd 2011 as 53rd week of 2010 where it should be 52nd. This works correctly in the original code but not in your adaptation. – Alasdair Dec 13 '11 at 10:32
  • 4
    You saved my ass. Thanks. If you want to contribute to Open Source, I suggest you create a patch for the jQuery UI method: $.datepicker.iso8601Week(date) as it does only return weekNo, but no year. – Christian Oct 31 '12 at 22:08
  • 1
    Aha! I see. I didn't know that was how the ISO was defined. No problem, then. Carry on. (: – peirix Aug 26 '15 at 12:36
  • 14
    Today, January 4 2016, I noticed that it was necesarry to add d.setMilliseconds(0) as well - it kept showing different week numbers for the same date depending on whether I used new Date() or new Date("1/4/2016"). Just a heads up for others who might experience the same. – Jacob Lauritzen Jan 4 '16 at 6:38
  • 2
    Provided code does not follow ISO 8601, it's off by one – Eric Grange Feb 26 '16 at 7:53

You can use momentjs library also:

moment().format('W')

  • 1
    or moment().week() – Alex78191 May 18 '17 at 10:58

Accordily http://javascript.about.com/library/blweekyear.htm

Date.prototype.getWeek = function() {
    var onejan = new Date(this.getFullYear(),0,1);
    var millisecsInDay = 86400000;
    return Math.ceil((((this - onejan) /millisecsInDay) + onejan.getDay()+1)/7);
};
  • 1
    Concise, but treats Sunday as the first day of the week so Sunday 27 December 2015 is the first day of week 53 rather than the last day of week 52. That may suit some though. – RobG Jul 23 '14 at 23:31
  • 2
    i think since this is being added to the prototype it's what you would expect as Date treats sunday as the first day. – Ed Sykes Dec 10 '15 at 11:06
  • Won't this have problems on Daylight Saving Time days? I think it will not advance until 1am during the summer. – Hafthor Feb 17 '16 at 16:09
  • Also, doesn't this technically not advance the week until 0:00:00.001? Better to use Math.floor? – Hafthor Feb 17 '16 at 16:20

As said above but without a class:

let now = new Date();
let onejan = new Date(now.getFullYear(), 0, 1);
week = Math.ceil( (((now - onejan) / 86400000) + onejan.getDay() + 1) / 7 );
  • 1
    one-jan-tang! *ninja-roll* – CoDEmanX Sep 1 '15 at 21:50
  • 1
    This is the only answer that fetches correct week number even for first week of a year. – PrasadW Jan 10 '17 at 6:15

Jacob Wright's Date.format() library implements date formatting in the style of PHP's date() function and supports the ISO-8601 week number:

new Date().format('W');

It may be a bit overkill for just a week number, but it does support PHP style formatting and is quite handy if you'll be doing a lot of this.

  • Good solution for quick hacked-together scripts :) – Time Sheep Jul 19 '15 at 9:40
getWeekOfYear: function(date) {
        var target = new Date(date.valueOf()),
            dayNumber = (date.getUTCDay() + 6) % 7,
            firstThursday;

        target.setUTCDate(target.getUTCDate() - dayNumber + 3);
        firstThursday = target.valueOf();
        target.setUTCMonth(0, 1);

        if (target.getUTCDay() !== 4) {
            target.setUTCMonth(0, 1 + ((4 - target.getUTCDay()) + 7) % 7);
        }

        return Math.ceil((firstThursday - target) /  (7 * 24 * 3600 * 1000)) + 1;
    }

Following code is timezone-independent (UTC dates used) and works according to the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601

This adds "getWeek" method to Date.prototype which returns number of week from the beginning of the year. The argument defines which day of the week to consider the first. If no argument passed, first day is assumed Sunday.

/**
 * Get week number in the year.
 * @param  {Integer} [weekStart=0]  First day of the week. 0-based. 0 for Sunday, 6 for Saturday.
 * @return {Integer}                0-based number of week.
 */
Date.prototype.getWeek = function(weekStart) {
    var januaryFirst = new Date(this.getFullYear(), 0, 1);
    if(weekStart !== undefined && (typeof weekStart !== 'number' || weekStart % 1 !== 0 || weekStart < 0 || weekStart > 6)) {
      throw new Error('Wrong argument. Must be an integer between 0 and 6.');
    }
    weekStart = weekStart || 0;
    return Math.floor((((this - januaryFirst) / 86400000) + januaryFirst.getDay() - weekStart) / 7);
};
  • 1
    The first calendar week of 2016 starts at the 4th of January in Germany, but your function starts counting again from 0 from the 1st January on. It also returns wrong numbers at the end of the year, e.g. 52 for 2018-11-31 (53rd week), although it's already the 1st calendar week of 2019: new Date(Date.UTC(2018,11, 31)).getWeek(1)+1 (Monday is the 1st day of week in Germany). – CoDEmanX Aug 29 '15 at 18:02
  • That's how it was intended, and that's, I believe, the most likely use case. Otherwise the first 3 days of 2016 would fall out. First days of the month are considered to comprise the first week for that month, no-matter which and how many days there are. If you need the function to work differently, you can tweak it according to your needs. Likewise, if a week falls into both the given year and the following year, it can be called the last week of that year, as well as the first week of the following year (according to current logic). – Tigran Sep 1 '15 at 9:36
  • Thanks for the info. I ended up using RobG's solution, which implements ISO8601 week dates correctly (last days in December and the first days in January may belong to week 52, 53 or 1: en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_week_date – CoDEmanX Sep 1 '15 at 11:08

I found useful the Java SE's SimpleDateFormat class described on Oracle's specification: http://goo.gl/7MbCh5. In my case in Google Apps Script it worked like this:

function getWeekNumber() {
  var weekNum = parseInt(Utilities.formatDate(new Date(), "GMT", "w"));
  Logger.log(weekNum);
}

For example in a spreadsheet macro you can retrieve the actual timezone of the file:

function getWeekNumber() {
  var weekNum = parseInt(Utilities.formatDate(new Date(), SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getSpreadsheetTimeZone(), "w"));
  Logger.log(weekNum);
}
  • The hint for GAS was great, thank you! – Steffen T Oct 7 '17 at 23:21

Get the weeknumber of any given Date

function week(year,month,day) {
    function serial(days) { return 86400000*days; }
    function dateserial(year,month,day) { return (new Date(year,month-1,day).valueOf()); }
    function weekday(date) { return (new Date(date)).getDay()+1; }
    function yearserial(date) { return (new Date(date)).getFullYear(); }
    var date = year instanceof Date ? year.valueOf() : typeof year === "string" ? new Date(year).valueOf() : dateserial(year,month,day), 
        date2 = dateserial(yearserial(date - serial(weekday(date-serial(1))) + serial(4)),1,3);
    return ~~((date - date2 + serial(weekday(date2) + 5))/ serial(7));
}

Example

console.log(
    week(2016, 06, 11),//23
    week(2015, 9, 26),//39
    week(2016, 1, 1),//53
    week(2016, 1, 4),//1
    week(new Date(2016, 0, 4)),//1
    week("11 january 2016")//2
);
  • 1
    I cannot believe it, but this function is the only one that worked all the time! The accepted answer played up when it went past daylight savings, others said '0' as the week number on certain years. - and some relied on UTC functions that sometimes returned the previous day therefore assigning it week '53' or '54'. Unfortunately I need the week to begin on a Sunday and this code is very hard to understand... – Melissa Zachariadis Oct 16 '16 at 2:52

If you are already in an Angular project you could use $filter('date').

For example:

var myDate = new Date();
var myWeek = $filter('date')(myDate, 'ww');

The code below calculates the correct ISO 8601 week number. It matches PHP's date("W") for every week between 1/1/1970 and 1/1/2100.

/**
 * Get the ISO week date week number
 */
Date.prototype.getWeek = function () {
  // Create a copy of this date object
  var target = new Date(this.valueOf());

  // ISO week date weeks start on Monday, so correct the day number
  var dayNr = (this.getDay() + 6) % 7;

  // ISO 8601 states that week 1 is the week with the first Thursday of that year
  // Set the target date to the Thursday in the target week
  target.setDate(target.getDate() - dayNr + 3);

  // Store the millisecond value of the target date
  var firstThursday = target.valueOf();

  // Set the target to the first Thursday of the year
  // First, set the target to January 1st
  target.setMonth(0, 1);

  // Not a Thursday? Correct the date to the next Thursday
  if (target.getDay() !== 4) {
    target.setMonth(0, 1 + ((4 - target.getDay()) + 7) % 7);
  }

  // The week number is the number of weeks between the first Thursday of the year
  // and the Thursday in the target week (604800000 = 7 * 24 * 3600 * 1000)
  return 1 + Math.ceil((firstThursday - target) / 604800000);
}

Source: Taco van den Broek


If you're not into extending prototypes, then here's a function:

function getWeek(date) {
  if (!(date instanceof Date)) date = new Date();

  // ISO week date weeks start on Monday, so correct the day number
  var nDay = (date.getDay() + 6) % 7;

  // ISO 8601 states that week 1 is the week with the first Thursday of that year
  // Set the target date to the Thursday in the target week
  date.setDate(date.getDate() - nDay + 3);

  // Store the millisecond value of the target date
  var n1stThursday = date.valueOf();

  // Set the target to the first Thursday of the year
  // First, set the target to January 1st
  date.setMonth(0, 1);

  // Not a Thursday? Correct the date to the next Thursday
  if (date.getDay() !== 4) {
    date.setMonth(0, 1 + ((4 - date.getDay()) + 7) % 7);
  }

  // The week number is the number of weeks between the first Thursday of the year
  // and the Thursday in the target week (604800000 = 7 * 24 * 3600 * 1000)
  return 1 + Math.ceil((n1stThursday - date) / 604800000);
}

Sample usage:

getWeek(); // Returns 37 (or whatever the current week is)
getWeek(new Date('Jan 2, 2011')); // Returns 52
getWeek(new Date('Jan 1, 2016')); // Returns 53
getWeek(new Date('Jan 4, 2016')); // Returns 1
  • I like this function, but I have a question; What do I do if I want to put it back to sunday? I have no idea what the +6 ) % 7 part does. Thanks from a scrub! – NoobishPro Oct 22 '16 at 16:53
  • 1
    @Babydead ISO week starts on a Monday, but JavaScript getDay() starts on a Sunday, so if you want it to start on Sunday then you can remove the correction: var nDay = date.getDay(); – thdoan Oct 24 '16 at 2:13
  • I've tried over 8 different JS implementations of getting week number. This is the only function that works, but only if I change all getters and setters to getUTC.. and setUTC.. Don't know why. I was testing with this: 2017-07-17T00:00:00.000Z (week 29) 2017-07-23T23:59:59.000Z (week 29) 2021-01-04T00:00:00.000Z (week 1) – psycho brm Jul 18 '17 at 13:27

Here is my implementation for calculating the week number in JavaScript. corrected for summer and winter time offsets as well. I used the definition of the week from this article: ISO 8601

Weeks are from mondays to sunday, and january 4th is always in the first week of the year.

// add get week prototype functions
// weeks always start from monday to sunday
// january 4th is always in the first week of the year
Date.prototype.getWeek = function () {
    year = this.getFullYear();
    var currentDotw = this.getWeekDay();
    if (this.getMonth() == 11 && this.getDate() - currentDotw > 28) {
        // if true, the week is part of next year 
        return this.getWeekForYear(year + 1);
    }
    if (this.getMonth() == 0 && this.getDate() + 6 - currentDotw < 4) {
        // if true, the week is part of previous year
        return this.getWeekForYear(year - 1);
    }
    return this.getWeekForYear(year);
}

// returns a zero based day, where monday = 0
// all weeks start with monday
Date.prototype.getWeekDay = function () {
    return  (this.getDay() + 6) % 7;
}

// corrected for summer/winter time
Date.prototype.getWeekForYear = function (year) {
    var currentDotw = this.getWeekDay();
    var fourjan = new Date(year, 0, 4);
    var firstDotw = fourjan.getWeekDay();
    var dayTotal = this.getDaysDifferenceCorrected(fourjan) // the difference in days between the two dates.
    // correct for the days of the week
    dayTotal += firstDotw; // the difference between the current date and the first monday of the first week, 
    dayTotal -= currentDotw; // the difference between the first monday and the current week's monday
    // day total should be a multiple of 7 now
    var weeknumber = dayTotal / 7 + 1; // add one since it gives a zero based week number.
    return weeknumber;
}

// corrected for timezones and offset
Date.prototype.getDaysDifferenceCorrected = function (other) {
    var millisecondsDifference = (this - other);
    // correct for offset difference. offsets are in minutes, the difference is in milliseconds
    millisecondsDifference += (other.getTimezoneOffset()- this.getTimezoneOffset()) * 60000;
    // return day total. 1 day is 86400000 milliseconds, floor the value to return only full days
    return Math.floor(millisecondsDifference / 86400000);
}

for testing i used the following JavaScript tests in Qunit

var runweekcompare = function(result, expected) {
    equal(result, expected,'Week nr expected value: ' + expected + ' Actual value: ' + result);
}

test('first week number test', function () {
    expect(5);
    var temp = new Date(2016, 0, 4); // is the monday of the first week of the year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 1);
    var temp = new Date(2016, 0, 4, 23, 50); // is the monday of the first week of the year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 1);
    var temp = new Date(2016, 0, 10, 23, 50); // is the sunday of the first week of the year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 1);
    var temp = new Date(2016, 0, 11, 23, 50); // is the second week of the year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 2);
    var temp = new Date(2016, 1, 29, 23, 50); // is the 9th week of the year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 9);
});

test('first day is part of last years last week', function () {
    expect(2);
    var temp = new Date(2016, 0, 1, 23, 50); // is the first last week of the previous year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 53);
    var temp = new Date(2011, 0, 2, 23, 50); // is the first last week of the previous year
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 52);
});

test('last  day is part of next years first week', function () {
    var temp = new Date(2013, 11, 30); // is part of the first week of 2014
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 1);
});

test('summer winter time change', function () {
    expect(2);
    var temp = new Date(2000, 2, 26); 
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 12);
    var temp = new Date(2000, 2, 27); 
    runweekcompare(temp.getWeek(), 13);
});

test('full 20 year test', function () {
    //expect(20 * 12 * 28 * 2);
    for (i = 2000; i < 2020; i++) {
        for (month = 0; month < 12; month++) {
            for (day = 1; day < 29 ; day++) {
                var temp = new Date(i, month, day);
                var expectedweek = temp.getWeek();
                var temp2 = new Date(i, month, day, 23, 50);
                var resultweek = temp.getWeek();
                equal(expectedweek, Math.round(expectedweek), 'week number whole number expected ' + Math.round(expectedweek) + ' resulted week nr ' + expectedweek);
                equal(resultweek, expectedweek, 'Week nr expected value: ' + expectedweek + ' Actual value: ' + resultweek + ' for year ' + i + ' month ' + month + ' day ' + day);
            }
        }
    }
});

This week number thing has been a real pain in the a**. Most of scripts around the net didn't work for me. They worked most of time but all of them broke in some point, especially when year changed and last week of the year was suddenly next year's first week etc. Even Angular's date filter showed incorrect data (it was 1st week of next year, angular gave week 53).

Note: Examples are designed to work with European weeks (Mon first)!

getWeek()

Date.prototype.getWeek = function(){

    // current week's Thursday
    var curWeek = new Date(this.getTime());
        curWeek.setDay(4);

    // Get year's first week's Thursday
    var firstWeek = new Date(curWeek.getFullYear(), 0, 4);
        firstWeek.setDay(4);

    return (curWeek.getDayIndex() - firstWeek.getDayIndex()) / 7 + 1;
};

setDay()

/**
* Make a setDay() prototype for Date
* Sets week day for the date
*/
Date.prototype.setDay = function(day){

    // Get day and make Sunday to 7
    var weekDay = this.getDay() || 7;
    var distance = day - weekDay;
    this.setDate(this.getDate() + distance);

    return this;
}

getDayIndex()

/*
* Returns index of given date (from Jan 1st)
*/

Date.prototype.getDayIndex = function(){
    var start = new Date(this.getFullYear(), 0, 0);
    var diff = this - start;
    var oneDay = 86400000;

    return Math.floor(diff / oneDay);
};

I have tested this and it seems to be working very well but if you notice a flaw in it, please let me know.

I tried a lot to get the shortest code to get the weeknumber ISO-conform.

Date.prototype.getWeek=function(){
    var date=new Date(this);
    date.setHours(0,0,0,0);
    return Math.round(((date.setDate(this.getDate()+2-(this.getDay()||7))-date.setMonth(0,4))/8.64e7+3+(date.getDay()||7))/7)+"/"+date.getFullYear();}

The variable date is necessary to avoid to alter the original this. I used the return values of setDate() and setMonth() to dispense with getTime() to save code length and I used an expontial number for milliseconds of a day instead of a multiplication of single elements or a number with five zeros. this is Date or Number of milliseconds, return value is String e.g. "49/2017".

now = new Date();
today = new Date(now.getFullYear(), now.getMonth(), now.getDate());
firstOfYear = new Date(now.getFullYear(), 0, 1);
numOfWeek = Math.ceil((((today - firstOfYear) / 86400000)-1)/7);

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