50

I'm working on a project in which I am trying to make a paint program. So far I've used Netbeans to create a GUI and set up the program.

As of right now I am able to call all the coordinated necessary to draw inside it but I am very confused with how to actually paint inside it.

Towards the end of my code I have a failed attempt at drawing inside the panel.

Can anyone explain/show how to use graphics in a example like this?

All examples I have found make a class and extend it with JPanel but I don't know if I can do this since it was generated in netbeans.

I need to draw inside a JPanel, inside my JFrame. I don't know where to put the graphics class.

JavaPaintUI Class

package javapaint;

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class JavaPaintUI extends javax.swing.JFrame {

public JavaPaintUI() {
    initComponents();
}


private void initComponents() {


    jPanel2 = new javax.swing.JPanel();

    jPanel2.setBackground(new java.awt.Color(255, 255, 255));
    jPanel2.setBorder(javax.swing.BorderFactory.createBevelBorder(javax.swing.border.BevelBorder.RAISED));
    jPanel2.addMouseListener(new java.awt.event.MouseAdapter() {
        public void mousePressed(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
            jPanel2MousePressed(evt);
        }
        public void mouseReleased(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
            jPanel2MouseReleased(evt);
        }
    });
    jPanel2.addMouseMotionListener(new java.awt.event.MouseMotionAdapter() {
        public void mouseDragged(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
            jPanel2MouseDragged(evt);
        }
    });
    pack();
}// </editor-fold>                        

int currentX, currentY, oldX, oldY;

private void jPanel2MouseDragged(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {                                     
    if (tool == 1) {
        currentX = evt.getX();
        currentY = evt.getY();
        oldX = currentX;
        oldY = currentY;
        System.out.println(currentX + " " + currentY);
        System.out.println("PEN!!!!");
    }

}                                    

private void jPanel2MousePressed(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {                                     
    oldX = evt.getX();
    oldY = evt.getY();
    System.out.println(oldX + " " + oldY);
}                                    


//mouse released//
private void jPanel2MouseReleased(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {                                      
    if (tool == 2) {
        currentX = evt.getX();
        currentY = evt.getY();
        System.out.println("line!!!! from" + oldX + "to" + currentX);
    }
}                                     

//set ui visible//
public static void main(String args[]) {
    java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

        public void run() {
            new JavaPaintUI().setVisible(true);
        }
    });
}

// Variables declaration - do not modify                     
private javax.swing.JPanel jPanel2;
// End of variables declaration                   

class jPanel2 extends JPanel {

    @Override
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        super.paintComponent(g);

        g.drawString("BLAH", 20, 20);
        g.drawRect(200, 200, 200, 200);
    }
}
}

Screen shot

The whole thing is a JFrame and the white section in the center is jPanel2 which is what I want to draw on. screen shot of some code that is not this

3
  • 7
    For a very simple example of painting in Java, please see my reply in this thread: changing-jpanel-graphics-g-color-drawing-line. Also, don't futz with NetBeans-generated code as learning to first code Swing/graphics yourself will pay immediate and long-term dividends. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 25 '11 at 2:01
  • 4
    "all examples i have found make a class and extend it with jpanel but i dont know if i can do this since it was generated in netbeans." Well there's your basic problem, not understanding how to use your automagic IDE. In that case I recommend putting aside the IDE you do not understand, and which has seemingly grabbed you by the short groin hairs, and learn how to code Java. Maybe later, with the help of the F1 facility of the IDE, you'll figure how to work with custom components. But leave that for the moment, since it is an extra complication you don't need. – Andrew Thompson May 25 '11 at 2:12
  • 1
    for sure, i realized this on several sites now that cheaters don't win :) thanks guys alot further now than i was before – Nick R May 25 '11 at 4:46
37

Note the extra comments.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.border.*;

class JavaPaintUI extends JFrame {

    private int tool = 1;
    int currentX, currentY, oldX, oldY;

    public JavaPaintUI() {
        initComponents();
    }

    private void initComponents() {
        // we want a custom Panel2, not a generic JPanel!
        jPanel2 = new Panel2();

        jPanel2.setBackground(new java.awt.Color(255, 255, 255));
        jPanel2.setBorder(BorderFactory.createBevelBorder(BevelBorder.RAISED));
        jPanel2.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            public void mousePressed(MouseEvent evt) {
                jPanel2MousePressed(evt);
            }
            public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent evt) {
                jPanel2MouseReleased(evt);
            }
        });
        jPanel2.addMouseMotionListener(new MouseMotionAdapter() {
            public void mouseDragged(MouseEvent evt) {
                jPanel2MouseDragged(evt);
            }
        });

        // add the component to the frame to see it!
        this.setContentPane(jPanel2);
        // be nice to testers..
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        pack();
    }// </editor-fold>

    private void jPanel2MouseDragged(MouseEvent evt) {
        if (tool == 1) {
            currentX = evt.getX();
            currentY = evt.getY();
            oldX = currentX;
            oldY = currentY;
            System.out.println(currentX + " " + currentY);
            System.out.println("PEN!!!!");
        }
    }

    private void jPanel2MousePressed(MouseEvent evt) {
        oldX = evt.getX();
        oldY = evt.getY();
        System.out.println(oldX + " " + oldY);
    }


    //mouse released//
    private void jPanel2MouseReleased(MouseEvent evt) {
        if (tool == 2) {
            currentX = evt.getX();
            currentY = evt.getY();
            System.out.println("line!!!! from" + oldX + "to" + currentX);
        }
    }

    //set ui visible//
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                new JavaPaintUI().setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    // Variables declaration - do not modify
    private JPanel jPanel2;
    // End of variables declaration

    // This class name is very confusing, since it is also used as the
    // name of an attribute!
    //class jPanel2 extends JPanel {
    class Panel2 extends JPanel {

        Panel2() {
            // set a preferred size for the custom panel.
            setPreferredSize(new Dimension(420,420));
        }

        @Override
        public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);

            g.drawString("BLAH", 20, 20);
            g.drawRect(200, 200, 200, 200);
        }
    }
}

Screen Shot

enter image description here

Other examples - more tailored to multiple lines & multiple line segments

HFOE put a good link as the first comment on this thread. Camickr also has a description of active painting vs. drawing to a BufferedImage in the Custom Painting Approaches article.

See also this approach using painting in a BufferedImage.

15
  • @Andrew, the only thing you answer does is rename the inner class... my answer gives a viable solution on how to code a drawing program. I'm not attacking your answer. I'm saying it could be a one liner comment and would provide the same impact. The question is "can anyone explain/show how to use graphics in a example like this?" Now, does your answer answers it? – Yanick Rochon May 25 '11 at 2:52
  • @Yanick: "the only thing you answer does is rename the inner class.." Check the comments starting with the following to see the 5 noteworthy changes to the source. // we want a custom Panel2, not a generic JPanel! // add the component to the frame to see it! // be nice to testers.. // This class name is very confusing, since it is also used as the // name of an attribute! // set a preferred size for the custom panel. – Andrew Thompson May 25 '11 at 2:56
  • I've read your "modifications" (read the update on my last comment); it still does not answer the question. I'm actually surprised you have an upvote. – Yanick Rochon May 25 '11 at 2:58
  • 6
    +1 for answering the question with working code by tweaking the original code. – camickr May 25 '11 at 3:08
  • Thanks for answer, However when i do these changes it overides all my other UI's and swing components (possibly all the netbeans stuff). okay now to make it paint when you move the mouse im using g.drawLine(oldX, oldY, currentX, currentY); but if i put that in my paintcomponent followed by repaint() it only draws the line temporary. I want it do draw lines similar to how i have it output (when pen is selected, every movement paints a line from new and previous cords and when the line is selected it paints a line when released from the first point to the second point) – Nick R May 25 '11 at 3:54
16

When working with graphical user interfaces, you need to remember that drawing on a pane is done in the Java AWT/Swing event queue. You can't just use the Graphics object outside the paint()/paintComponent()/etc. methods.

However, you can use a technique called "Frame buffering". Basically, you need to have a BufferedImage and draw directly on it (see it's createGraphics() method; that graphics context you can keep and reuse for multiple operations on a same BufferedImage instance, no need to recreate it all the time, only when creating a new instance). Then, in your JPanel's paintComponent(), you simply need to draw the BufferedImage instance unto the JPanel. Using this technique, you can perform zoom, translation and rotation operations quite easily through affine transformations.

3
  • Thanks for the answer, ive seen this used in a few examples but was unsure of what it did. ill try it out. – Nick R May 25 '11 at 3:32
  • I think i have bit off too much for me to chew on this one, havent learned nearly enough of these concepts. – Nick R May 25 '11 at 3:50
  • 1
    @Nick, see a buffered image like a glorified 2d array of pixel values with convenient drawing methods, etc. Your application draws unto the buffered image--via the buffered image's Graphics context--and your JPanel use that image to update itself when it is ready to be updated (when the OS redraws it). This the most simple solution in your case; for raster graphics. A yet more complex solution would be to keep an array of drawing elements like suggested by Andrew, instead of a buffered image, and draw those elements in the paintComponent method; for a vector graphics solution. – Yanick Rochon May 25 '11 at 13:08
11

Here is a simple example. I suppose it will be easy to understand:

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class Graph extends JFrame {
JFrame f = new JFrame();
JPanel jp;


public Graph() {
    f.setTitle("Simple Drawing");
    f.setSize(300, 300);
    f.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

    jp = new GPanel();
    f.add(jp);
    f.setVisible(true);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Graph g1 = new Graph();
    g1.setVisible(true);
}

class GPanel extends JPanel {
    public GPanel() {
        f.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
    }

    @Override
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        //rectangle originates at 10,10 and ends at 240,240
        g.drawRect(10, 10, 240, 240);
        //filled Rectangle with rounded corners.    
        g.fillRoundRect(50, 50, 100, 100, 80, 80);
    }
}

}

And the output looks like this:

Output

1
  • 2
    You either extends JFrame or use JFrame f = new JFrame();. By doing both you create 2 JFrame objects. Also you can omit g.drawRect(10, 10, 240, 240); – c0der May 11 '17 at 5:36
0

Variation of the code by Bijaya Bidari that is accepted by Java 8 without warnings in regard with overridable method calls in constructor:

public class Graph extends JFrame {
    JPanel jp;

    public Graph() {
        super("Simple Drawing");
        super.setSize(300, 300);
        super.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        jp = new GPanel();
        super.add(jp);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Graph g1 = new Graph();
        g1.setVisible(true);
    }

    class GPanel extends JPanel {
        public GPanel() {
            super.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
        }

        @Override
        public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            //rectangle originated at 10,10 and end at 240,240
            g.drawRect(10, 10, 240, 240);
                    //filled Rectangle with rounded corners.    
            g.fillRoundRect(50, 50, 100, 100, 80, 80);
        }
    }
}

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