85

I've been trying to convert a value of seconds (in a BigDecimal variable) to a string in an editText like "1 hour 22 minutes 33 seconds" or something of the kind.

I've tried this:

String sequenceCaptureTime = "";
BigDecimal roundThreeCalc = new BigDecimal("0");
BigDecimal hours = new BigDecimal("0");
BigDecimal myremainder = new BigDecimal("0");
BigDecimal minutes = new BigDecimal("0");
BigDecimal seconds = new BigDecimal("0");
BigDecimal var3600 = new BigDecimal("3600");
BigDecimal var60 = new BigDecimal("60");

(I have a roundThreeCalc which is the value in seconds so I try to convert it here.)

hours = (roundThreeCalc.divide(var3600));
myremainder = (roundThreeCalc.remainder(var3600));
minutes = (myremainder.divide(var60));
seconds = (myremainder.remainder(var60));
sequenceCaptureTime =  hours.toString() + minutes.toString() + seconds.toString();

Then I set the editText to sequnceCaptureTime String. But that didn't work. It force closed the app every time. I am totally out of my depth here, any help is greatly appreciated. Happy coding!

18 Answers 18

57

You should have more luck with

hours = roundThreeCalc.divide(var3600, BigDecimal.ROUND_FLOOR);
myremainder = roundThreeCalc.remainder(var3600);
minutes = myremainder.divide(var60, BigDecimal.ROUND_FLOOR);
seconds = myremainder.remainder(var60);

This will drop the decimal values after each division.

Edit: If that didn't work, try this. (I just wrote and tested it)

public static int[] splitToComponentTimes(BigDecimal biggy)
{
    long longVal = biggy.longValue();
    int hours = (int) longVal / 3600;
    int remainder = (int) longVal - hours * 3600;
    int mins = remainder / 60;
    remainder = remainder - mins * 60;
    int secs = remainder;

    int[] ints = {hours , mins , secs};
    return ints;
}
  • 1
    Well it returned results, but not the correct ones. – rabbitt May 25 '11 at 2:46
  • 5
    This solution is more graceful: stackoverflow.com/questions/625433/… – Alex Kucherenko Oct 5 '12 at 12:56
  • @AlexKucherenko except that solution works with milliseconds – Mikhail Jan 12 '17 at 7:37
  • 1
    @Mikhail TimeUnit.#### will allow you to do it with any unit of time. – Amir Omidi Apr 4 '18 at 7:36
194

Is it necessary to use a BigDecimal? If you don't have to, I'd use an int or long for seconds, and it would simplify things a little bit:

hours = totalSecs / 3600;
minutes = (totalSecs % 3600) / 60;
seconds = totalSecs % 60;

timeString = String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds);

You might want to pad each to make sure they're two digit values(or whatever) in the string, though.

  • I will have to implement fractions of a second later on in dev, right now I am just trying to get the calculation to work in the first place. – rabbitt May 25 '11 at 2:49
  • 11
    String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds); – Jeffrey Blattman Apr 30 '14 at 20:56
  • This is simply impressive. I wonder how modulus could work in this way. – PSo Sep 13 '16 at 9:11
  • Use Locale otherwise it will gives you warning. String.format(Locale.ENGLISH, "%02d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds) – Pratik Butani AndroidDev Jan 10 '17 at 5:06
61

DateUtils.formatElapsedTime(long), formats an elapsed time in the form "MM:SS" or "H:MM:SS" . It returns the String you are looking for. You can find the documentation here

  • 1
    This one is simple and exactly what I need. I recommend others this method – Nabin Mar 8 '16 at 8:21
  • 1
    This is by far the cleanest solution - no need to reinvent the wheel guys... – Magnus W Aug 20 '16 at 20:46
  • 1
    This should be the correct answer for Android. – mtkopone Jan 17 at 13:50
  • Don't forget that it expect parameter in seconds. So you need to convert millis to seconds – kiranking Feb 25 at 11:06
25

Here is the working code:

private String getDurationString(int seconds) {

    int hours = seconds / 3600;
    int minutes = (seconds % 3600) / 60;
    seconds = seconds % 60;

    return twoDigitString(hours) + " : " + twoDigitString(minutes) + " : " + twoDigitString(seconds);
}

private String twoDigitString(int number) {

    if (number == 0) {
        return "00";
    }

    if (number / 10 == 0) {
        return "0" + number;
    }

    return String.valueOf(number);
}
  • 3
    I like this answer but you need to change '% 10' to '/ 10' – Hakem Zaied Jan 15 '13 at 21:04
24

Something really helpful in Java 8

import java.time.LocalTime;

private String ConvertSecondToHHMMSSString(int nSecondTime) {
    return LocalTime.MIN.plusSeconds(nSecondTime).toString();
}
  • Note: The calculation wraps around midnight when using plusSeconds(long seconds), for eg: if seconds is 86400(24 hrs) it outputs 00:00. – karthi Sep 4 '18 at 6:46
  • It does exactly what the name suggests 'ConvertSecondToHHMMSSString'. The other (tedious) solutions are also wrapping around. – Epicurist Oct 18 '18 at 9:29
14

I prefer java's built in TimeUnit library

long seconds = TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(8);
10
private String ConvertSecondToHHMMString(int secondtTime)
{
  TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
  SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss");
  df.setTimeZone(tz);
  String time = df.format(new Date(secondtTime*1000L));

  return time;

}
  • You could further improve your answer by explaining what the code does and how it solves the problem ;-) – 2Dee Jun 24 '14 at 11:28
8

This is my simple solution:

String secToTime(int sec) {
    int seconds = sec % 60;
    int minutes = sec / 60;
    if (minutes >= 60) {
        int hours = minutes / 60;
        minutes %= 60;
        if( hours >= 24) {
            int days = hours / 24;
            return String.format("%d days %02d:%02d:%02d", days,hours%24, minutes, seconds);
        }
        return String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds);
    }
    return String.format("00:%02d:%02d", minutes, seconds);
}

Test Results:

Result: 00:00:36 - 36
Result: 01:00:07 - 3607
Result: 6313 days 12:39:05 - 545488745
3

I like to keep things simple therefore:

    int tot_seconds = 5000;
    int hours = tot_seconds / 3600;
    int minutes = (tot_seconds % 3600) / 60;
    int seconds = tot_seconds % 60;

    String timeString = String.format("%02d Hour %02d Minutes %02d Seconds ", hours, minutes, seconds);

    System.out.println(timeString);

The result will be: 01 Hour 23 Minutes 20 Seconds

  • shortest Answer , Awesome – AndroSco Dec 10 '17 at 10:08
3

This Code Is working Fine :

txtTimer.setText(String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d",(SecondsCounter/3600), ((SecondsCounter % 3600)/60), (SecondsCounter % 60)));
3

A nice and easy way to do it using GregorianCalendar

Import these into the project:

import java.util.GregorianCalendar;
import java.util.Date;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Scanner;

And then:

Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in);

System.out.println("Seconds: ");
int secs = s.nextInt();

GregorianCalendar cal = new GregorianCalendar(0,0,0,0,0,secs);
Date dNow = cal.getTime();
SimpleDateFormat ft = new SimpleDateFormat("HH 'hours' mm 'minutes' ss 'seconds'");
System.out.println("Your time: " + ft.format(dNow));
  • 1
    I love this one! – eduyayo Oct 31 '18 at 14:38
2

Here's my function to address the problem:

public static String getConvertedTime(double time){

    double h,m,s,mil;

    mil = time % 1000;
    s = time/1000;
    m = s/60;
    h = m/60;
    s = s % 60;
    m = m % 60;
    h = h % 24;

    return ((int)h < 10 ? "0"+String.valueOf((int)h) : String.valueOf((int)h))+":"+((int)m < 10 ? "0"+String.valueOf((int)m) : String.valueOf((int)m))
            +":"+((int)s < 10 ? "0"+String.valueOf((int)s) : String.valueOf((int)s))
            +":"+((int)mil > 100 ? String.valueOf((int)mil) : (int)mil > 9 ? "0"+String.valueOf((int)mil) : "00"+String.valueOf((int)mil));
}
1

I use this:

 public String SEG2HOR( long lnValue) {     //OK
        String lcStr = "00:00:00";
        String lcSign = (lnValue>=0 ? " " : "-");
        lnValue = lnValue * (lnValue>=0 ? 1 : -1); 

        if (lnValue>0) {                
            long lnHor  = (lnValue/3600);
            long lnHor1 = (lnValue % 3600);
            long lnMin  = (lnHor1/60);
            long lnSec  = (lnHor1 % 60);            

                        lcStr = lcSign + ( lnHor < 10 ? "0": "") + String.valueOf(lnHor) +":"+
                              ( lnMin < 10 ? "0": "") + String.valueOf(lnMin) +":"+
                              ( lnSec < 10 ? "0": "") + String.valueOf(lnSec) ;
        }

        return lcStr;           
    }
1

If you want the units h, min and sec for a duration you can use this:

String convertSeconds(int seconds)
    int h = seconds/ 3600;
    int m = (seconds % 3600) / 60;
    int s = seconds % 60;
    String sh = (h > 0 ? String.valueOf(h) + " " + "h" : "");
    String sm = (m < 10 && m > 0 && h > 0 ? "0" : "") + (m > 0 ? (h > 0 && s == 0 ? String.valueOf(m) : String.valueOf(m) + " " + "min") : "");
    String ss = (s == 0 && (h > 0 || m > 0) ? "" : (s < 10 && (h > 0 || m > 0) ? "0" : "") + String.valueOf(s) + " " + "sec");
    return sh + (h > 0 ? " " : "") + sm + (m > 0 ? " " : "") + ss;
}

int seconds = 3661;
String duration = convertSeconds(seconds);

That's a lot of conditional operators. The method will return those strings:

0    -> 0 sec
5    -> 5 sec
60   -> 1 min
65   -> 1 min 05 sec
3600 -> 1 h
3601 -> 1 h 01 sec
3660 -> 1 h 01
3661 -> 1 h 01 min 01 sec
108000 -> 30 h
  • Exactly what I was looking for, nice answer @Nicolas !!!! – Skizo-ozᴉʞS Apr 2 at 17:02
1

I know this is pretty old but in java 8:

LocalTime.MIN.plusSeconds(120).format(DateTimeFormatter.ISO_LOCAL_TIME)
1

for just minutes and seconds use this

String.format("%02d:%02d", (seconds / 3600 * 60 + ((seconds % 3600) / 60)), (seconds % 60))
0

I use this in python to convert a float representing seconds to hours, minutes, seconds, and microseconds. It's reasonably elegant and is handy for converting to a datetime type via strptime to convert. It could also be easily extended to longer intervals (weeks, months, etc.) if needed.

    def sectohmsus(seconds):
        x = seconds
        hmsus = []
        for i in [3600, 60, 1]:  # seconds in a hour, minute, and second
            hmsus.append(int(x / i))
            x %= i
        hmsus.append(int(round(x * 1000000)))  # microseconds
        return hmsus  # hours, minutes, seconds, microsecond
0

i have tried the best way and less code but may be it is little bit difficult to understand how i wrote my code but if you good at maths it is so easy

import java.util.Scanner;

class hours {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    double s;


    System.out.println("how many second you have ");
    s =input.nextInt();



     double h=s/3600;
     int h2=(int)h;

     double h_h2=h-h2;
     double m=h_h2*60;
     int m1=(int)m;

     double m_m1=m-m1;
     double m_m1s=m_m1*60;






     System.out.println(h2+" hours:"+m1+" Minutes:"+Math.round(m_m1s)+" seconds");





}

}

more over it is accurate !

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