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I have a Postgres pod which has a mounted volume:

kind: PersistentVolume
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  name: postgres-pv
  labels:
    type: local
spec:
  storageClassName: manual
  capacity:
    storage: 100M
  accessModes:
    - ReadWriteOnce
  hostPath:
    path: "/mnt/data"
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: PersistentVolumeClaim
metadata:
  labels:
    app: postgres
  name: psql-claim
spec:
  storageClassName: manual
  accessModes:
  - ReadWriteOnce
  resources:
    requests:
      storage: 100M

The yaml contains the following:

volumeMounts:
            - mountPath: /docker-entrypoint-initdb.d/
              name: psql-config-map-volume
            - mountPath: /var/lib/postgresql/data
              name: psql-claim 
              subPath: postgres
      volumes:
        - name: psql-config-map-volume
          configMap:
            name: psql-config-map // contains an init.sql
        - name: psql-claim
          persistentVolumeClaim:
            claimName: psql-claim

It works well, data retain after deployment/pod deletion and redeploy.

The problem appears when I modify the init.sql. It didn't come into effect and got this message at psql pod startup:

PostgreSQL Database directory appears to contain a database; Skipping initialization

The pod itself starts without any error (just with the old init.sql data)

What I have tried:

  1. Deleting the deployment,the pvc and pv. Then redeploy everything. Same result.
  2. I searched the hostpath data but /mnt/data is empty.

What else should I try? How can I force the init.sql to launch? Where the actual old data is stored if not in the hostpath?

edit: I have search for pg files and found this:
/var/lib/docker/overlay2/6ae2../merged/mnt/data/postgres/pg_ident.conf
/var/lib/docker/overlay2/6ae2../diff/mnt/data/postgres/pg_ident.conf
And it still exists after pvc and pv deletion. How can I gracefully reset its data?

1 Answer 1

1

I just had a similar situation. It turned out that I had a typo in my initdb.sh script. This results in PG starting, failing to apply the script and crashing. This causes the container to restart, and the next time, PG skips the script.

I finally figured it out because the pod was showing restartCount: 1. Running kubectl logs postgres-0 --previous gave me the logs from before the crash, which pointed to a typo in my script (LC_TYPE instead of LC_CTYPE, in my case).

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