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On this page it says:

Beginning a transaction causes any pending transaction to be committed.

So then in essence begin transaction acts like a lock. But then on this page it says:

If you query data and then insert or update related data within the same transaction, the regular SELECT statement does not give enough protection. Other transactions can update or delete the same rows you just queried.

These statements appear contradictory to me and how do I reconcile them? To take an example, suppose I am implementing a Like Button. There is a table with following columns (user, post, is_liked) and another table that stores (post, total_likes). So to process a like request I would like to:

  1. Read the value of is_liked which is a boolean given the user and post.
  2. Then toggle is_liked and update like count

All this needs to be done atomically. According to first reference, I don't need to lock while reading since beginning a transaction causes any pending transaction to be committed. And if some other transaction tries to update the rows concurrently, it will be blocked by my pending transaction. But the second reference says otherwise. So who is correct and why?

Question 2: If I do need to lock (which I suspect I do), do I use LOCK IN SHARE MODE or FOR UPDATE?

  • 1. You reconcile them through the innodb read consistency model. 2. You don't need a lock if you are using innodb because the query starts at a point in time and the data are guaranteed to be consistent for that point in time. – Jeff Holt Apr 14 at 16:31
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You would hide the increasing or decreasing in a trigger. so there is no need for a transaction

But you can lockl the table, also in a tranbsaction see.

If you query data and then insert or update related data within the same transaction, the regular SELECT statement does not give enough protection. Other transactions can update or delete the same rows you just queried. InnoDB supports two types of locking reads that offer extra safety:

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/innodb-locking-reads.html

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Starting a transaction is not like a lock. That's a misunderstanding.

InnoDB implements "optimistic locking" by default. No locks are acquired by starting a transaction. When you execute a locking SQL statement, then locks are acquired as needed.

In your case, you should choose SELECT ... FOR UPDATE because that's what you are preparing to do — update the record after reading it.


Re your comments:

If you were to use SELECT LOCK IN SHARE MODE, it could lead to deadlocks.

SESSION 1                       SESSION 2

SELECT ... LOCK IN SHARE MODE
ok
                                SELECT ... LOCK IN SHARE MODE
                                ok
UPDATE
waits
                                UPDATE
                                waits

In the sequence above, you end up with two sessions waiting on each other, which is a deadlock. Neither one will give up, so MySQL has to kill one or the other.

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  • the docs for LOCK IN SHARE MODE say: "Other sessions can read the rows, but cannot modify them until your transaction commits. If any of these rows were changed by another transaction that has not yet committed, your query waits until that transaction ends and then uses the latest values." So then why use FOR UPDATE? – morpheus Apr 14 at 16:48
  • also still looking for answer to my question. "Beginning a transaction causes any pending transaction to be committed." If this is not a lock, then I don't know what is. – morpheus Apr 14 at 17:11
  • Committing a transaction releases locks held by that transaction. It does not create new locks. – Bill Karwin Apr 14 at 17:20

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