30

The following code does not catch an exception, when I try to divide by 0. Do I need to throw an exception, or does the computer automatically throw one at runtime?

int i = 0;

cin >> i;  // what if someone enters zero?

try {
    i = 5/i;
}
catch (std::logic_error e) {

    cerr << e.what();
}
  • 9
    Why not just check wheter i is zero or not? – Nick May 25 '11 at 8:34
  • 11
    Why are you trying to divide by ze— OH SHI— – BoltClock May 25 '11 at 8:35
  • No not really, I edited my question. – user33424 May 25 '11 at 8:40
  • This question and all the ensuing answers are a fine study in everything that's wrong with exceptions. – Carey Gregory Oct 15 '13 at 4:15
51

You need to check it yourself and throw an exception. Integer divide by zero is not an exception in standard C++.

Neither is floating point divide by zero but at least that has specific means for dealing with it.

The exceptions listed in the ISO standard are:

namespace std {
    class logic_error;
        class domain_error;
        class invalid_argument;
        class length_error;
        class out_of_range;
    class runtime_error;
        class range_error;
        class overflow_error;
        class underflow_error;
}

and you would think that overflow_error would be ideal for indicating a divide by zero.

But section 5.6 (of C++11, though I don't think this has changed from the previous iteration) specifically states:

If the second operand of / or % is zero, the behavior is undefined.

So, it could throw that (or any other) exception. It could also format your hard disk and laugh derisively :-)


If you wanted to implement such a beast, you could use something like intDivEx in the following program:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

// Integer division, catching divide by zero.

inline int intDivEx (int numerator, int denominator) {
    if (denominator == 0)
        throw std::overflow_error("Divide by zero exception");
    return numerator / denominator;
}

int main (void) {
    int i = 42;

    try {
        i = intDivEx (10, 2);
    } catch (std::overflow_error e) {
        std::cout << e.what() << " -> ";
    }
    std::cout << i << std::endl;

    try {
        i = intDivEx (10, 0);
    } catch (std::overflow_error e) {
        std::cout << e.what() << " -> ";
    }
    std::cout << i << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

This outputs:

5
Divide by zero exception -> 5

and you can see it throws and catches the exception for the divide by zero case.


The % equivalent is almost exactly the same:

// Integer remainder, catching divide by zero.

inline int intModEx (int numerator, int denominator) {
    if (denominator == 0)
        throw std::overflow_error("Divide by zero exception");
    return numerator % denominator;
}
  • Thanks, I was looking for the cases when system throws an exception, are these possible in c++? – user33424 May 25 '11 at 8:43
  • 1
    @user33424, yes it's possible, see my answer for example on std::bad_alloc which is thrown by new – iammilind May 25 '11 at 8:46
  • hmm so you don't have to choose carefully when you decide to use an exception class as they all take same parameter. – user33424 May 25 '11 at 9:09
  • @user But you should choose one that makes your intention clear about what went wrong. Throwing bad_alloc for e.g. invalid_argument is bad design. – RedX May 25 '11 at 9:40
  • 4
    As the domain of a function is the set of valid inputs for which the function is defined, wouldn't domain_error be more appropriate to throw here? – John H Mar 14 '14 at 18:21
12

Updated with comments from ExcessPhase

GCC (at least version 4.8) will let you emulate this behaviour:

#include <signal.h>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::shared_ptr<void(int)> handler(
        signal(SIGFPE, [](int signum) {throw std::logic_error("FPE"); }),
        [](__sighandler_t f) { signal(SIGFPE, f); });

    int i = 0;

    std::cin >> i;  // what if someone enters zero?

    try {
        i = 5/i;
    }
    catch (std::logic_error e) {
        std::cerr << e.what();
    }
}

This sets up a new signal handler which throws an exception, and a shared_ptr to the old signal handler, with a custom 'deletion' function that restores the old handler when it goes out of scope.

You need to compile with at least these options:

g++ -c Foo.cc -o Foo.o -fnon-call-exceptions -std=c++11

Visual C++ will also let you do something similar:

#include <eh.h>
#include <memory>

int main() {
    std::shared_ptr<void(unsigned, EXCEPTION_POINTERS*)> handler(
        _set_se_translator([](unsigned u, EXCEPTION_POINTERS* p) {
            switch(u) {
                case FLT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO:
                case INT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO:
                    throw std::logic_error("Divide by zero");
                    break;
                ...
                default:
                    throw std::logic_error("SEH exception");
            }
        }),
        [](_se_translator_function f) { _set_se_translator(f); });

    int i = 0;

    try {
        i = 5 / i;
    } catch(std::logic_error e) {
        std::cerr << e.what();
    }
}

And of course you can skip all the C++11-ishness of this and put them in a traditional RAII-managing struct.

  • Setting and restoring the signal handler should use RAII! Also you cannot assume, that the default signal handler was the one you temporarily replaced. – user4590120 Nov 3 '15 at 17:46
  • Thanks, @ExcessPhase, I've updated the answer to reflect this. – Tom Feb 23 '16 at 14:35
  • While compiling the visual c++ code in visual studio 2012, I am getting this error: "FLT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO' : undeclared identifier". I have included "windows.h". Where am I going wrong ? – Nishant Jul 15 '16 at 4:10
  • code needs to be fixed. There are mistakes. – kyb May 25 '18 at 11:01
  • 1
    Ah, I see what you mean, but no, SIGFPE is for integer divide-by-zero too. Single Unix Specification defines SIGFPE as "Erroneous arithmetic operation." FLT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO is indeed for floating-point-only and there is a corresponding INT_DIVIDE_BY_ZERO; I'll update the answer. – Tom Jan 8 at 15:06
7

As far as I know C++ specifications does not mention anything about divide by zero exeption. I believe you need to do it yourself...

Stroustrup says, in "The Design and Evolution of C++" (Addison Wesley, 1994), "low-level events, such as arithmetic overflows and divide by zero, are assumed to be handled by a dedicated lower-level mechanism rather than by exceptions. This enables C++ to match the behaviour of other languages when it comes to arithmetic. It also avoids the problems that occur on heavily pipelined architectures where events such as divide by zero are asynchronous."`

1

You should check if i = 0 and not devide then.

(Optionally after checking it you can throw an exception and handle it later).

More info at: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/exceptions.html

0

You need to throw the exception manually using throw keyword.

Example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

double division(int a, int b)
{
   if( b == 0 )
   {
      throw "Division by zero condition!";
   }
   return (a/b);
}

int main ()
{
   int x = 50;
   int y = 0;
   double z = 0;

   try {
     z = division(x, y);
     cout << z << endl;
   }catch (const char* msg) {
     cerr << msg << endl;
   }

   return 0;
}
-2

do i need to throw an exception or does the computer automatically throws one at runtime?

Either you need to throw the exception yourself and catch it. e.g.

try {
  //...
  throw int();
}
catch(int i) { }

Or catch the exception which is thrown by your code.

try {
    int *p = new int();
}
catch (std::bad_alloc e) {
    cerr << e.what();
}

In your case, I am not sure if is there any standard exception meant for divide by zero. If there is no such exception then you can use,

catch(...) {  // catch 'any' exception
}
  • 2
    Division by zero is undefined behavior. – GManNickG May 25 '11 at 8:52
  • people, which do not know about this features existence (in Windows since more than 20 years and OSX) should not be answering here, nor voting nor calling themselves software engineers. – user4590120 Mar 1 '16 at 17:45
-4

You can just do assert(2 * i != i) which will throw an assert. You can write your own exception class if you need something fancier.

  • 1
    -1 I really dislike this solution. How is that easier than assert(i != 0)? I did not think through the border cases, but if it's not trivial to see that an assertion is stated correctly, then you should not put it. – kay Jul 14 '12 at 23:09
  • In addition, assert is frequently deactivated in production code due to the presence of NDEBUG - assert() is typically a development-only method for catching problems. In any case, throwing an assertion is not throwing an exception. The former will abort your program rather than generate something you can catch. – paxdiablo Nov 3 '15 at 1:47

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.