3

Assuming the following class:

template <typename T>
class Test {
public:
    void do_something1();
    ...
    void do_something100(); // basically many functions already defined
}

How can I add another function to a specialisation of the class while not rewriting all possibly 100 functions that are already templated?

template<>
class Test<int> {
public:
    void do_something_else();
}

...

int main() {
    auto x = Test<int>();
    x.do_something5();     // should be still valid, would call 
                           // Test<T>::do_something5() with T being int
    x.do_something_else(); // valid because declared in specialisation
    ...
}

Right now, if the Test<int> specialisation is left as in the example above, it would only contain do_something_else(), without do_something1...100().


Solution

Based on the accepted answer, using the given example, I did the following:

namespace parent {
    template <typename T>
    class Test {
    public:
        void do_something1();
        ...
        void do_something100(); 
    }
}

template <typename T>
class Test : public parent::Test<T> {
    using parent::Test<T>::Test; // inherit constructors
}

template <>
class Test<int> : public parent::Test<int> {
    using parent::Test<int>::Test;
public:
    void do_something_else();
}
1
  • 1
    Unfortunately, C++ does not work this way. You will have to find some way to redesign your templates. Maybe put the common functions in a parent template class, and inherit from it in the subclass, with the default implementation, and some specializations. Apr 15 '20 at 2:54
2

You can create a common base class, and make both the primary template and specialization deriving from it.

Or you can make do_something_else function template and only works with int (then don't need using specialization).

template <typename T>
class Test {
public:
    void do_something1();
    ...
    void do_something100(); // basically many functions already defined

    template <typename X = T>
    std::enable_if_t<std::is_same_v<X, int> && std::is_same_v<X, T>> do_something_else();
};

Or since C++20 we can use Constraints as @aschepler suggested.

template <typename T>
class Test {
public:
    void do_something1();
    ...
    void do_something100(); // basically many functions already defined

    void do_something_else() requires std::is_same_v<T, int>;
};
3
  • I tried the common base class method and it works. And it's certainly the better solution compared to the std::enab... mess. That std::enab... mess is probably worth it only if adding one or two extra methods. Apr 15 '20 at 3:05
  • 1
    Or in C++20, just void do_something_else() requires std::is_same_v<T, int>;...
    – aschepler
    Apr 15 '20 at 3:44
  • @aschepler Yes it's elegant. Apr 15 '20 at 3:50

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