2

So I want to now if that possible for .NET languages to ignore error without using try catch construction ?

I can ignore warring with #nowarring 40 for example, can I ignore error ?

Why I want it ?

simply wanted to call system pause with this way

open System.Runtime.InteropServices
[<DllImport(@"msvcrt.dll")>]
extern void system(string str)
system "pause"

but got Error message

unbalanced stack. This is probably because the managed PInvoke signature does not match the unmanaged target signature. Make sure that the calling convention and parameters of the PInvoke signature match the target unmanaged signature.

So I don't care, it works. But can I just ignore this error ? without doing weird stuff like that :

try (system "pause") catch |_->()

Ok , I solved my problem by adding CallingConvention=CallingConvention.Cdecl, but what the question was about skipping exceptions, so and I still don't know if I can do it.

So maybe I need to tell some real reason to not be down-voted hard - sometimes it's matters for program to live even with hard errors occupations, but even sometimes you don't need to catch them. You need just ignore them...

off topic : proof image about using void instead of int : proof

  • Compile time or runtime? – ZoolWay May 25 '11 at 11:23
4
  • In C# I don't think there is a way to ignore all exceptions, apart from try ... catch
  • In VB.Net there is a way to ignore all exceptions:

VB.Net code:

On Error Resume Next '' all exceptions after this point will be ignored  
System("pause")

But it's a dangerous feature. Exceptions should only be ignored if

  1. You are absolutely confident that you understand why they have occurred
  2. You are absolutely confident that they can be safely ignored.

In my humble opinion, and with no offence meant, from your question I don't think you understand why the error has occurred or why it is dangerous to ignore it.

  • I understand and I even fixed it, but when I met this error I've get thinking about such feature. And so it exists. Interesting if that is only VB or C#/F# can do the same too. – cnd May 25 '11 at 12:06
  • @nCdy I don't think C# can do this, I don't know F# at all – MarkJ May 25 '11 at 12:07
  • 2
    It's worth installing the 14-day trial of Reflector just to see the insane code the VB.NET compiler generates when you use On Error Resume Next. It puts in labels between every line, maintains an integer to keep track of how many lines have been successfully run, and generates some switch statements to "resume". But, the important bit is it's still using a try/catch. – Graham Clark May 25 '11 at 12:38
  • +1 on the dangers of ignoring exceptions when one doesn't understand why they're occurring. This is why there's so much Daily WTF thedailywtf.com fodder in the world. – Onorio Catenacci May 25 '11 at 13:11
  • @Graham I've said that this feature should not be used, because it's foolish to ignore exceptions. The compiled code is interesting but not really relevant. Supposing On Error Resume Next was one instruction in intermediate language - would that make it a good idea? No. Does it matter that the compiler generates Try Catch? No, because my code is On Error Resume Next and not Try Catch. Have you ever looked at the code generated when you use lambdas? Sometimes it writes whole new classes. Does it mean VB/C# doesn't "really" support closures, because underneath it makes new classes? No. – MarkJ May 25 '11 at 16:20
8

Errors are there for a reason which should usually not be ignored. Your reason is that you are not using correct calling convention. See this answer for more information.

As for compile and runtime errors Graham has already pointed out the difference. If you get an unhandled runtime exception that usually means that your program is in an inconsistent state. If program would be allowed to continue there is no guarantee as to what would happen. It is better for a program to die than to proceed with corrupted data. You can have a look at AppDomain.UnhandledException event, but it only allows you to log the exception and do some cleaning, program will then exit anyway. There may be other options (depending on your programming language) but it is definitely not advisable to use them.

4

No. When you talk about ignoring warnings, these are compiler warnings. You can ignore these if you want, but they're generally warning you about something for a good reason. You can't ignore compiler errors, because when these occur, your code hasn't compiled and you have no binary to run.

When you talk about errors in your question, you're actually referring to exceptions. These are thrown at runtime. The only way to "ignore" them is to have a try/catch block which catches an exception and does nothing with it.

Also, if you really need to ignore an exception, it's best to catch the specific exception you want to ignore, rather than any exception. So, instead of something like this:

try
{
   ...
}
catch
{
}

or

try
{
   ...
}
catch(Exception)
{
}

you should try to use

try
{
   ...
}
catch(SpecificExceptionType)
{
}
  • Just for completeness: there is a way to do this in VB.Net but you really shouldn't use it. – MarkJ May 25 '11 at 12:04
  • @MarkJ: but that just causes the VB.NET compiler to wrap your code in a try/catch block, and to generate a plethora of labels and switch blocks. – Graham Clark May 25 '11 at 12:46
  • See my response in the other comment thread. – MarkJ May 25 '11 at 16:23
1

Why don't you declare it like this:

extern int system(string str)

Your compiler is telling you something important here: It is telling you that the system function returns an int and that it doesn't know what to do with it. You have to make sure your signature matches!

  • because I don't need output from it – cnd May 25 '11 at 11:26
  • @nCdy: but you don't have to do anything with the output int. It's more important the signatures match; this will probably stop the exception from being thrown. – Graham Clark May 25 '11 at 11:29
  • Just because you don't need the output, doesn't mean you can't use the correct signature... – Jaymz May 25 '11 at 11:29
  • You must use the right signature otherwise the stack will become unbalanced and you'll get an exception. – Robert May 25 '11 at 11:36
  • I'm getting same error using int as output. I fixed error with specifying CallingConvention. But even my question was not about it. Also I can't see the reason using correct format. – cnd May 25 '11 at 11:38
1

There is no built in way to ignore exceptions, but you could define your own function to do so:

let ignoreError func defaultValue =
    try func() with _ -> defaultValue
  • your code throws same error – cnd May 25 '11 at 11:37
  • Are you sure? I just retested and it worked fine on my machine. I even added a little more code to check the function returns correctly, see edit. – Robert May 25 '11 at 11:41
  • yes, I'm absolutely sure - check my first post. And you better try to use void. – cnd May 25 '11 at 11:46
  • Your right, both work int and void work on my machine. – Robert May 25 '11 at 11:53
1

Or you could simply turn off the MDA.

0

One approach is to create a method that takes a System.Action object and pass a lambda expression to execute, then whenever you want to execute something and ignore all errors just wrap this method call around it. This is shown below.

    public void IgnoreError(System.Action action)
    {
        try
        {
            action.Invoke();
        }
        catch
        {
        }
    }

    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        IgnoreError(() => { system "pause"; });
    }

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