58

I'm trying to dynamically pull back a GitHub secret using GitHub Actions at runtime:

Let's say I have two GitHub Secrets:

  1. SECRET_ORANGES : "This is an orange secret"
  2. SECRET_APPLES : "This is an apple secret"

In my GitHub Action, I have another env variable which will differ between branches

env:
  FRUIT_NAME: APPLES

Essentially I want to find a way to do some sort of variable substitution to get the correct secret. So in one of my child jobs, I want to do something like:

env:
  FRUIT_SECRET: {{ 'SECRET_' + env.FRUIT_NAME }}

I've tried the following approaches with no luck:

secrets['SECRET_$FRUIT_NAME'] }}

I even tried a simpler approach without concatenation just to try and get it working

secrets['$FRUIT_NAME'] }}

and

{{ secrets.$FRUIT_NAME }}

None of the above worked.

Apologies if I have not explained this very well. I tried to keep my example as simple as possible.

Anyone have any idea of how to achieve this?

Alternatively, what I am trying to do is to store secrets on a per-branch basis

For example:

In customer1 code branch: SECRET_CREDENTIAL="abc123"

In customer2 code branch: SECRET_CREDENTIAL="def456"

Then I can access the correct value for SECRET_CREDENTIAL depending on which branch I am in.

Thanks!

Update: I'm getting a bit closer to what I am trying to achieve:

name: Test

env:
  CUSTOMER: CUSTOMER1

jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    env:
      AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID: ${{ env.CUSTOMER }}_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID
    steps:
    - uses: actions/checkout@v2
    - run: |
        AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=${{ secrets[env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID] }}
        echo "AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID = $AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID"
5
  • Thinking out loud here, since the syntax is {{ secrets.SECRET_NAME }}, maybe you can try: {{ secrets['$FRUIT_NAME'] }}, or {{ secrets.$FRUIT_NAME }}. If both don't work, I suggest you edit your question and mention that you've already tried both
    – Meir Gabay
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 9:30
  • Thanks for the suggestion, when I do that, and echo it out, it's empty. Looks like it is not parsing the $FRUIT_NAME correctly as the value for the secret.
    – Mark McKim
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 11:08
  • 1
    What about {{ secrets[$FRUIT_NAME] }} ?
    – Meir Gabay
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 11:29
  • Unfortunately not - just tried and got Unexpected symbol: '$FRUIT_NAME'. Located at position 9 within expression: secrets[$FRUIT_NAME]
    – Mark McKim
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 12:39
  • 1
    Apparently it's doable, replied with a solution. I was really surprised to know that it's possible, thanks for making me strengthen my knowledge with GitHub Actions expressions :)
    – Meir Gabay
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 12:57

8 Answers 8

64

There is a much cleaner option to achieve this using the format function.

Given set secrets DEV_A and TEST_A, the following two jobs will use those two secrets:

name: Secrets

on: [push]

jobs:

  dev:
    name: dev
    runs-on: ubuntu-18.04
    env:
      ENVIRONMENT: DEV
    steps:
      - run: echo ${{ secrets[format('{0}_A', env.ENVIRONMENT)] }}

  test:
    name: test
    runs-on: ubuntu-18.04
    env:
      ENVIRONMENT: TEST
    steps:
      - run: echo ${{ secrets[format('{0}_A', env.ENVIRONMENT)] }}

This also works with input provided through manual workflows (the workflow_dispatch event):

name: Secrets

on:
  workflow_dispatch:
    inputs:
      env:
        description: "Environment to deploy to"
        required: true

jobs:
  secrets:
    name: secrets
    runs-on: ubuntu-18.04
    steps:
      - run: echo ${{ secrets[format('{0}_A', github.event.inputs.env)] }}
2
  • You shouldn't use ${{ }} directly in the body of run, instead set an env and use that with ${ } -- otherwise you risk issues with the shell interpreting special characters, spaces separating arguments, etc.
    – kbolino
    Commented Jan 2 at 18:54
  • 1
    I've never seen any documentation about avoiding ${{ }} in run steps, and my own experience suggests they're substituted by GitHub before being passed to the shell for execution Commented Jul 2 at 12:11
25

Update - July 2021

I found a better way to prepare dynamic secrets in a job, and then consume those secrets as environment variables in other jobs.

Here's how it looks like in GitHub Actions.

My assumption is that each secret should be fetched according to the branch name. I'm getting the branch's name with this action rlespinasse/github-slug-action.

Go through the inline comments to understand how it all works together.

name: Dynamic Secret Names

# Assumption:
# You've created the following GitHub secrets in your repository:
# AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_master
# AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_master

on:
  push:

env:
  AWS_REGION: "eu-west-1"

jobs:
  prepare:
    name: Prepare
    runs-on: ubuntu-20.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
      - name: Inject slug/short variables
        uses: rlespinasse/[email protected]
      - name: Prepare Outputs
        id: prepare-step
        # Sets this step's outputs, that later on will be exported as the job's outputs
        run: |
          echo "::set-output name=aws_access_key_id_name::AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}";
          echo "::set-output name=aws_secret_access_key_name::AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}";
    # Sets this job's, that will be consumed by other jobs
    # https://docs.github.com/en/actions/reference/workflow-syntax-for-github-actions#jobsjob_idoutputs
    outputs:
      aws_access_key_id_name: ${{ steps.prepare-step.outputs.aws_access_key_id_name }}
      aws_secret_access_key_name: ${{ steps.prepare-step.outputs.aws_secret_access_key_name }}

  test:
    name: Test
    # Must wait for `prepare` to complete so it can use `${{ needs.prepare.outputs.{output_name} }}`
    # https://docs.github.com/en/actions/reference/context-and-expression-syntax-for-github-actions#needs-context
    needs:
      - prepare
    runs-on: ubuntu-20.04
    env:
      # Get secret names
      AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_NAME: ${{ needs.prepare.outputs.aws_access_key_id_name }}
      AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_NAME: ${{ needs.prepare.outputs.aws_secret_access_key_name }}
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
      - name: Test Application
        env:
          # Inject secret values to environment variables
          AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID: ${{ secrets[env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_NAME] }}
          AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY: ${{ secrets[env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_NAME] }}
        run: |
          printenv | grep AWS_
          aws s3 ls

Update - August 2020

Following some hands-on experience with this project terraform-monorepo, here's an example of how I managed to use secret names dynamically

  1. Secrets names are aligned with environments names and branches names - development, staging and production
  2. $GITHUB_REF_SLUG comes from the Slug GitHub Action which fetches the name of the branch
  3. The commands which perform the parsing are
      - name: set-aws-credentials
        run: |
          echo "::set-env name=AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_SECRET_NAME::AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}"
          echo "::set-env name=AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_SECRET_NAME::AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}"
      - name: terraform-apply
        run: |
          export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=${{ secrets[env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_SECRET_NAME] }}
          export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=${{ secrets[env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_SECRET_NAME] }}

Full example

name: pipeline

on:
  push:
    branches: [development, staging, production]
    paths-ignore:
      - "README.md"

jobs:
  terraform:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest

    env:
      ### -----------------------
      ### Available in all steps, change app_name to your app_name
      TF_VAR_app_name: tfmonorepo
      ### -----------------------

    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
      - name: Inject slug/short variables
        uses: rlespinasse/[email protected]
      - name: prepare-files-folders
        run: |
          mkdir -p ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/
          cp live/*.${GITHUB_REF_SLUG} ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/
          cp live/*.tf ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/
          cp live/*.tpl ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/ 2>/dev/null || true
          mv ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/backend.tf.${GITHUB_REF_SLUG} ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/backend.tf
      - name: install-terraform
        uses: little-core-labs/install-terraform@v1
        with:
          version: 0.12.28
      - name: set-aws-credentials
        run: |
          echo "::set-env name=AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_SECRET_NAME::AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}"
          echo "::set-env name=AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_SECRET_NAME::AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}"
      - name: terraform-apply
        run: |
          export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=${{ secrets[env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID_SECRET_NAME] }}
          export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=${{ secrets[env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY_SECRET_NAME] }}
          cd ${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}/
          terraform version
          rm -rf .terraform
          terraform init -input=false
          terraform get
          terraform validate
          terraform plan -out=plan.tfout -var environment=${GITHUB_REF_SLUG}
          terraform apply -auto-approve plan.tfout 
          rm -rf .terraform

After reading this - Context and expression syntax for GitHub Actions , focusing on env object, I found out that:

As part of an expression, you may access context information using one of two syntaxes.

Index syntax: github['sha']

Property dereference syntax: github.sha

So the same behavior applies to secrets, you can do secrets[secret_name], so you can do the following

    - name: Run a multi-line script
      env:
        SECRET_NAME: A_FRUIT_NAME
      run: |
        echo "SECRET_NAME = $SECRET_NAME"
        echo "SECRET_NAME = ${{ env.SECRET_NAME }}"
        SECRET_VALUE=${{ secrets[env.SECRET_NAME] }}
        echo "SECRET_VALUE = $SECRET_VALUE"

Which results in

SECRET_NAME = A_FRUIT_NAME
SECRET_NAME = A_FRUIT_NAME
SECRET_VALUE = ***

Since the SECRET_VALUE is redacted, we can assume that the real secret was fetched.

Things that I learned -

  1. You can't reference env from another env, so this won't work

    env:
      SECRET_PREFIX: A
      SECRET_NAME: ${{ env.SECRET_PREFIX }}_FRUIT_NAME
    

    The result of SECRET_NAME is _FRUIT_NAME, not good

  2. You can use context expressions in your code, not only in env, you can see that in SECRET_VALUE=${{ secrets[env.SECRET_NAME] }}, which is cool

And of course - here's the workflow that I tested - https://github.com/unfor19/gha-play/runs/595345435?check_suite_focus=true - check the Run a multi-line script step

13
  • 1
    Fantastic! This is awesome. I've been playing around with this for hours and got nowhere. Thanks a lot. So how would this work with the fruit name if I need string concatenation: APPLE_SECRET1 APPLE_SECRET2 ORANGE_SECRET1 ORANGE_SECRET2 So I want to have A_FRUIT_NAME set to just APPLE or ORANGE but then use that placeholder elsewhere in the script to pull back both SECRET1 and SECRET2?
    – Mark McKim
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:03
  • Or if it helps, I can give a more concrete example of what I am trying to achieve which is based around AWS Credentials... I have two branches (CUSTOMER1 and CUSTOMER2). Each branch I want to set a variable called "CUSTOMER" in the yml file and it will be set to either CUSTOMER1 or CUSTOMER2 Then in Secrets, I have 2 sets of AWS Credentials... CUSTOMER1_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID CUSTOMER2_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID CUSTOMER1_AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY CUSTOMER2_AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY So I want to set the AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY to the value of CUSTOMER1_AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY
    – Mark McKim
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:09
  • Since you mentioned that CUSTOMER is a branch name, I think you can use github.ref, and then you can do this: env: AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID: ${{ github.ref }}_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID and then use ${{ secrets[env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID] }} makes sense?
    – Meir Gabay
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:14
  • Also, in case you need a CLI to add/update/delete/list your secrets, I've created a CLI so I can avoid using the GUI - github.com/unfor19/githubsecrets
    – Meir Gabay
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:19
  • Apologies, I am confusing things more by trying to keep it simple. I do have separate branches for customer 1 and customer 2, but the branch names don't map directly. The branch names are maybe more complex (feature/customer/customer1/develop) etc. Is there a way to do this without using the branch name directly? Using a single env variable further up the file containing the secret prefix: e.g. CUSTOMER: Customer1 (even if the branch name is something totally unrelated)
    – Mark McKim
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:25
15

In case this can help, after reading the above answers which truly helped, the strategy I decided to use consists of storing my secrets as follow:

  • DB_USER_MASTER
  • DB_PASSWORD_MASTER
  • DB_USER_TEST
  • DB_PASSWORD_TEST

Where MASTER is the master branch for the prod environment and TEST is the test branch for the test environment.

Then, using the suggested solutions in this thread, the key is to dynamically generate the keys of the secrets variable. Those keys are generated via an intermediate step (called vars in the sample below) using outputs:

name: Pulumi up
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master
      - test
jobs:
  up:
    name: Update
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - name: Create variables
        id: vars 
        run: |
          branch=${GITHUB_REF##*/} 
          echo "::set-output name=DB_USER::DB_USER_${branch^^}"
          echo "::set-output name=DB_PASSWORD::DB_PASSWORD_${branch^^}"
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
        with:
          fetch-depth: 1
      - uses: docker://pulumi/actions
        with:
          args: up -s ${GITHUB_REF##*/} -y
        env:
          AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID: ${{ secrets.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }}
          AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY: ${{ secrets.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY }}
          GOOGLE_CREDENTIALS: ${{ secrets.GOOGLE_CREDENTIALS }}
          PULUMI_ACCESS_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.PULUMI_ACCESS_TOKEN }}  
          DB_USER: ${{ secrets[steps.vars.outputs.DB_USER] }}  
          DB_PASSWORD: ${{ secrets[steps.vars.outputs.DB_PASSWORD] }}  

Notice the hack to get the branch on uppercase: ${branch^^}. This is required because GitHub forces secrets to uppercase.

1
  • 1
    Good job on this one! I'm not familiar with the step reference (vars), thanks for sharing
    – Meir Gabay
    Commented Aug 8, 2020 at 12:47
5

I was able to achieve this using the workflow name as the branch specific variable.

For each branch I create, I simply update this single value at the top of the YML file, then add GitHub Secrets to match the workflow name:

name: CUSTOMER1

jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    env:
      AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID: ${{ github.workflow }}_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID
    steps:
    - uses: actions/checkout@v2
    - run: echo "::set-env name=AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID::${{ secrets[env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID] }}"
    - run: echo $AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID

4

I came across this question when trying to implement environment-based secret selection for a Github action.

This variable-mapper action (https://github.com/marketplace/actions/variable-mapper) implements the desired concept of mapping a key variable or an environment name to secrets or other pre-defined values.

The example use of it shows this:

on: [push]
name: Export variables corresponding to regular expression-matched keys
jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
    - uses: kanga333/variable-mapper@v1 
      with:
        key: ${{GITHUB_REF#refs/heads/}}
        map: |
          {
            "master": {
              "environment": "production",
              "AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID": ${{ secrets.PROD_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }},
              "AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY": ${{ secrets.PROD_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }}
            },
            "staging": {
              "environment": "staging",
              "AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID": ${{ secrets.STG_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }},
              "AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY": ${{ secrets.STG_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }}
            },
            ".*": {
              "environment": "development",
              "AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID": ${{ secrets.DEV_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }},
              "AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY": ${{ secrets.DEV_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID }}
            }
          }
    - name: Echo environment
      run: echo ${{ env.environment }}
0
4

New solution as of December 2020

If you are reading this question because you need to use different secret values based on the environment you are deploying to, GitHub Actions now has a new feature called "Environments" in beta: https://docs.github.com/en/free-pro-team@latest/actions/reference/environments

This allows us to define environment secrets, and allow only jobs that are assigned to the environment to access them. This not only leads to better user experience as a developer, but also to better security and isolation of different deployment jobs.

Below is an example for how to dynamically determine the environment that should be used, based on the branch name:

jobs:
  get-environment-name:
    name: "Extract environment name"
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    outputs:
      environment: ${{ steps.extract.outputs.environment }}
    steps:
      - id: extract
        # You can run any logic you want here to map refs to environment names.
        # The GITHUB_REF will look like this: refs/heads/my-branchname
        # The example logic here simply removes "refs/heads/deploy-" from the beginning,
        # so a branch name deploy-prod would be mapped to the environment "prod"
        run: echo "::set-output name=environment::$(echo $GITHUB_REF | sed -e '/^refs\/heads\/deploy-\(.*\)$/!d;s//\1/')"
      - env:
          EXTRACTED: ${{ steps.extract.outputs.environment }}
        run: 'echo "Extracted environment name: $EXTRACTED"'

  deploy:
    name: "Deploy"
    if: ${{ github.event_name == 'push' && needs.get-environment-name.outputs.environment }}
    needs:
      - get-environment-name
#     - unit-tests
#     - frontend-tests
#     ... add your unit test jobs here, so they are executed before deploying anything
    environment: ${{ needs.get-environment-name.outputs.environment }}
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
#     ... Run your deployment actions here, with full access to the environment's secrets

Note that in the if: clause of the deployment job, it's not possible to use any environment variables or bash scripts. So using a previous job that extracts the environment name from the branch name is the simplest I could make it at the current time.

4
  • Awesome! This is great news! Thanks Carlo!
    – Mark McKim
    Commented Dec 20, 2020 at 13:01
  • 2
    I don't think this feature addresses the issue in its current beta form. The environments feature allows you to lock an entire job to a single environment config, but doesn't help you run the same job across multiple environments with env specific parameters. Commented Jan 14, 2021 at 13:31
  • 2
    I think it does so long as you can dynamically assign the environment. So if you can get the name of the branch and use that to match to your environment, problem solved.
    – Jim Jimson
    Commented Mar 26, 2021 at 19:10
  • I finally got around to implementing this in some of my projects. It does work, although it's a little tricky to trigger the deployment job only when on a deployment branch. I added example workflow configuration for reference. Commented Jun 25, 2021 at 8:13
4

Don't use ::set-env, it is deprecated.

Use instead

echo "env_key=env_value" >> $GITHUB_ENV

You can set the env variable on a branch basis by setting env as in this example.

Suppose you have at least two secrets with different prefixes in your repository, like this: (DEV_SERVER_IP, OTHER_SERVER_IP)

I use 'format', '$GITHUB_ENV' which are workflow commands and function provide on Github.

- name: Set develop env
  if: ${{ github.ref == 'refs/heads/develop' }}
  run: echo "branch_name=DEVELOP" >> $GITHUB_ENV
- name: Set other env
  if: ${{ github.ref == 'refs/heads/other' }}
  run: echo "branch_name=OTHER" >> $GITHUB_ENV
- name: SSH Test
  env:
    SERVER_IP: ${{ secrets[format('{0}_SERVER_IP', env.branch_name)] }}
  run: ssh -T user@$SERVER_IP
1
  • I fell into this trap. set-output and set-env are NOT deprecated on GitHub Enterprise, more importantly GITHUB_ENV and GITHUB_OUTPUT will not exist on your runner and your runner will not pick up a later version than it's Enterprise server recommends. So the above command fails! They maybe deprecated soon-ish, but as I write this neither 3.6 nor 3.7 (latest) support the redirect option.
    – Martin
    Commented Nov 11, 2022 at 16:26
1

Year 2024, I used it like this for HELM CI/CD

name: setup

on:
  workflow_dispatch:
    inputs:
      environment:
        type: string
        required: true
        default: 'qa'
permissions:
  id-token: write
  contents: read
jobs:
  deploy-infra:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    needs: get-repo-properties
    defaults:
        run:
          shell: bash
          working-directory: ./
    steps:

      - name: Set environment name
        run: |
          echo "env_name=${{ github.event.inputs.environment }}" >> $GITHUB_ENV

      - name: Secrets Dynamically
        run: |
          secret1=$(echo "${{ format('UP_AZURE_SUBSCRIPTION_{0}', env.env_name) }}")
          echo "SUBSCRIPTION_ENV=$secret1" >> $GITHUB_ENV
          var1=$(echo "${{ format ('UP_ACR_NAME_{0}', env.env_name) }}")
          echo "ACR_NAME_ENV=$var1" >> $GITHUB_ENV
          var2=$(echo "${{ format ('UP_AKS_CLUSTER_{0}', env.env_name) }}")
          echo "AKS_ENV=$var2" >> $GITHUB_ENV
          var3=$(echo "${{ format ('UP_AZURE_RG_{0}', env.env_name) }}")
          echo "RG_ENV=$var3" >> $GITHUB_ENV
          var4=$(echo "${{ format ('UP_ACR_URL_{0}', env.env_name) }}")
          echo "ACR_URL_ENV=$var4" >> $GITHUB_ENV
          secret2=$(echo "${{ format ('HELM_SECRET_{0}', env.env_name) }}")
          echo "HELM_SECRET_ENV=$secret2" >> $GITHUB_ENV
      - name: ACR login
        run: |
          az acr login --name ${{ vars[env.ACR_NAME_ENV] }}
      - name: Set AKS context
        id: set-context
        uses: azure/aks-set-context@v4
        with:
          resource-group: ${{ vars[env.RG_ENV] }}
          cluster-name: ${{ vars[env.AKS_ENV] }}
          admin: 'true'
          use-kubelogin: 'true'
      - name: Helm CI
        run: |
          helm package .
          chartPackage=$(ls *.tgz)
          helm registry login ${{ vars[env.ACR_URL_ENV] }} -u ${{ vars[env.ACR_NAME_ENV] }} --password ${{ secrets[env.HELM_SECRET_ENV] }}

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