52

I was wondering if the DbContext class is thread safe, I am assuming it's not, as I am currently executing paralell threads that access the DbContext in my application and I am getting a host of locking exceptions and other things that look like they may be thread related.

Until recently I wasn't getting any errors...but until recently I wasn't accessing the DbContext in the threads.

If I am right, what would people suggest as a solution?

58

It's not thread safe. Simply create a new instance of DbContext in you thread.

  • 3
    This is my approach too. But, how safe is this (not thread-wise, but db-wise)? As Chris said in his answer, is there any weird behaviour I should expect? – Thanasis Ioannidis Aug 24 '12 at 16:03
27

No it is not thread safe - whole EF is not thread safe because EF context should never be shared.

  • 1
    So really you should create the dbcontext every time you want to use it? At the moment I just have a dbcontext field as part of my repository class, I suppose creating it when I need it will solve this problem... – jcvandan May 25 '11 at 15:14
  • 2
    You can have one context per repository if a new instance of repository is used by single logical transaction and if your repository is thread safe. – Ladislav Mrnka May 25 '11 at 15:15
  • yeh I guess, to save changes to the dbcontext I am guessing you have to call save changes on the same instance of dbcontext on which you made changes? – jcvandan May 25 '11 at 15:18
  • You don't have to but then you have to deal with detached entities which can be pretty hard. You must detach entities from the first context (it breaks relations) attach them to a new context and say the new context what changes you did. – Ladislav Mrnka May 25 '11 at 15:23
  • 1
    @LadislavMrnka what do u think about locking? I share one instance of DbContext per HTTP request in my MVC application and we have several threads working on one instance. – tugberk Dec 6 '12 at 14:22
12

Edited - old answer below.

I now always use this pattern with DbContext:

using(var db = new LogDbContext())
{
    // Perform work then get rid of the thing
}

My approach of one per Request Thread meant cached objects in the DbContext would stick around and become stale even while other DbContext instances were writing new values to the actual database behind it. This would create some strange issues of for example one request performing an insert and the next request for the list coming in on a different thread that had a cached, stale list of the data for that query.

There are approaches that make the below work and even improve performance of many-reads/few-writes style apps, but they take more design and strategy than the much simpler pattern above.

Update

I also use a useful helper method for library methods, like logging calls. Here's the helper method:

    public static async Task Using(Db db, Func<Db, Task> action)
    {
        if (db == null)
        {
            using (db = new Db())
            {
                await action(db);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            await action(db);
        }
    }

With this I can easily write code that takes an optional existing DbContext, or instantiates one inside a using context, depending on how it happens to be called.

For example, while working with a DbContext I might load some data, log some info, and then save that data - it's best to do this all with the same DbContext from a performance perspective. On the other hand I might also want to log something in response to a simple action, and neither load nor write any other data. By leveraging the above method I can have just the one logging method that works whether you want to work inside an existing DbContext or not:

public async Task WriteLine(string line, Db _db = null)
{
    await Db.Using(_db, db => {
        db.LogLines.Add(new LogLine(line));
        await db.SaveChangesAsync();
    });
}

Now this method call can be called inside or outside of an existing DbContext and still behave the right way, instead of having to have 2 versions of this and every other convenience logging method or other utility method I have, and instead of having to know and plan for the context of every call that will ever be made to them or their callers. This basically returns to me one of the benefits of the below threadstatic strategy where I didn't have to worry about when exactly the db opened in utility calls that should be worried about it.

Old answer

I usually handle thread-safety with EF DbContext like so:

public class LogDbContext : DbContext
{
    . . .

    [ThreadStatic]
    protected static LogDbContext current;

    public static LogDbContext Current()
    {
        if (current == null)
            current = new LogDbContext();

        return current;
    }

    . . .
}

With this in place I can get a DbContext for this thread like so:

var db = LogDbContext.Current();

It's important to notice that since each DbContext keeps its own local cache, each thread will now have its own separate cache of entity objects, which can introduce some crazy behavior if you're not prepared for it. However, creating new DbContext objects can be expensive, and this approach minimizes that cost.

  • I handle this situation in the same way. But since I am an EF newbie, could you please elaborate on that crazy behaviour you talking about? I'm using this dbcontext in a web forms project, and I dispose each thread's current dbcontext at the Application_EndRequest event. – Thanasis Ioannidis Aug 24 '12 at 16:02
  • 1
    Application_EndRequest isn't the right place to Dispose it because a request won't necessarily be processed on that thread from start to finish; another request might be processed on the same thread before this one completes, dispose the DbContext, and BOOM. The crazy behavior is too long to describe in a Comment, post a separate Question and I'll answer there. – Chris Moschini Aug 24 '12 at 22:18
  • 1
    weird i thought each request gets it's own thread! What is the right place to Dispose a thread static object in a WebForms page lifecylce then? – Thanasis Ioannidis Aug 27 '12 at 8:42
  • 1
    Requests are processed on the ASP.Net Threadpool, which if you google you'll find endless writing on the subject. Basically many requests are processed on any given thread. I don't dispose my DbContext; it manages opening and closing connections under the hood on its own. – Chris Moschini Aug 28 '12 at 21:28
  • So a DbContext only needs to close and dispose its connections? And when exactly this happens? Is it safe to just leave a ThreadStatic DbContext hanging until the GC collects it? I think I read somewhere that the ThreadStatic objects must be manually disposed... is there no problem with that? – Thanasis Ioannidis Aug 30 '12 at 14:09

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