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Java 14 is non-LTS.

Given the new release train of 6 monthly releases and that 8 and 11 were LTS, should Java 14 not have been the next LTS release?

Or is purely based on the Java architects to decide which they pick for LTS?

I did search online but couldn't find an answer.

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  • 7
    "For product releases after Java SE 8, Oracle will designate a release, every three years, as a Long-Term-Support (LTS) release." (source) - so basicly next one should be some release in 2021.
    – Amongalen
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 8:59
  • 17
    LTS releases are every 3 years. 11 was the first LTS release under the six-month release cadence; the next will be 17. Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:49

2 Answers 2

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Take look at this announcement:

For product releases after Java SE 8, Oracle will designate a release, every three years, as a Long-Term-Support (LTS) release.

This means another LTS (ver. 17) should be 3 years after Java 11, so in September 2021. Java 14, however, was released in March 2020, so no LTS.

Java 8 is LTS, but it is not a part of 3-year release cycle, which was announced long after the release of java 8.

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  • 5
    September 2021 should be Java 17. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 9:09
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As others have quoted, Oracle is to designate a release as LTS every 3 years. However, as I read this policy, the designated release does not need to be the last one, or even one produced during the same year. For example, the release to be designated as LTS during 2021 could be (though not very probably) Java 14 instead of 16 or 17, depending on adoption, stability, and other important factors. If this were the correct interpretation, I'd actually agree with it as it would not put the development of new features on freeze (or severe slowdown) as the end of each 3-year period approaches.

Bottom line, we'll see.

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